Forbes murder trial pushed to Sept

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Recommended for you Related Items:attorney Arthur Hamilton, Christopher Forbes, murder, trial Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppGrand Turk, TCI July 18, 2017 — While murder-accused Christopher Forbes seeks additional counsel, his trial has been pushed back to September, 2017. Forbes, 33, is charged with two heinous murders which shocked the nation last year. The victims, two young Dominican women, Yuneiry Veras and Sonrineida Moreno Arias, were killed in April and July respectively. Both women’s bodies were found in bushes in remote areas of Providenciales. Forbes is currently represented by attorney Arthur Hamilton and the trial was set to begin July 13. However, Forbes is seeking a QC in addition to Hamilton and to facilitate this, the case has been postponed to September. Forbes is a Bahamian, TCI Belonger who worked as a bouncer at the time of the murders.#MagneticMediaNews#ForbesMurderTrial Worst fears as a tourist is murdered in Providenciales; ten homicides for 2019 Bahamas Police takes 10 to court for murders and other crimes, including a couple for cruelty to a child Freeport Man Killed in ‘The Ghetto’, Homicide Count Now At 100last_img read more

Homeowners Join Lawsuit Against Crosby Chemical Plant That Burned After Hurricane Harvey

first_imgPlaintiffs are seeking more than $1 million in damages, the suit says.Bureau Veritas declined to comment Wednesday afternoon. Arkema said earlier this month that it would “vigorously defend a lawsuit that we believe is gravely mistaken.”Officials have compared smoke from the thousands of pounds of burning organic peroxides to what emerges from a campfire or barbecue and maintained that it was a “non-toxic irritant.” The Environmental Protection Agency said earlier this month that “surface level water runoff results were less than the screening levels that would warrant further investigation” and air testing “found no exceedances” of required levels.But the lawsuit criticizes company executives for “repeatedly [denying] that the chemicals were toxic or harmful in any manner … Plaintiffs relied upon these representations and suffered serious bodily injuries as a result,” the suit says.The fires started in the wake of Hurricane Harvey, whose floodwaters took out the plant’s primary and backup sources of power. Without refrigeration, organic peroxides in the plant began to degrade, culminating in a series of explosions beginning Aug. 31 and continuing over the next several days.Residents within a 1.5 mile radius of the plant were evacuated for a week while the chemicals burned. When they returned to their homes, they were advised to wear protective clothing and drink bottled water. Chemical Safety BoardThe Arkema plant in Crosby, Texas is covered in debris after a series of chemical fires that occurred as a result of floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey.Eleven plaintiffs and a new defendant were added Wednesday to a lawsuit against Arkema Inc., an international chemical company whose plant near Houston spewed clouds of smoke from a series of chemical fires earlier this month after it was inundated by six feet of floodwaters from Hurricane Harvey.The updated lawsuit alleges that Arkema and the new defendant, Bureau Veritas — an air quality monitoring company that Arkema contracted to conduct testing in the vicinity of the plant — failed to properly advise first responders and neighbors about the dangers of fumes from the fires, which spewed black smoke high above the plant in Crosby. The lawsuit, originally filed Sept. 7 with seven first responders listed as plaintiffs, has since swelled to include six additional first responders as well as a slate of area homeowners who claim that in addition to property damage related to the fires, they suffered “upper respiratory infections, bronchitis, pneumonia, itchy, burning eyes, tight, burning throats and the like — illnesses and injuries that did not exist prior to the explosions and fires at the Arkema facility and illnesses resulting from and exacerbated by the explosions and fire at the Arkema facility.”Medical personnel and police officers called to the first fire in the early hours of Aug. 31 “began to fall ill in the middle of the road,” and were “doubled over vomiting, unable to breathe,” the lawsuit claims. Sharelast_img read more

Businesses Are Put On Notice When It Comes To Spring Break Alcohol

first_img Listen X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: TABC has been doing what it calls “minor stings.” During those operations, agents observe while an underaged person attempts to buy alcohol. They’ve been doing those stings along travel corridors near college campuses. Other operations have taken place on South Padre Island and Austin’s SXSW festival.When a violation occurs, TABC’s Chris Porter said it may be a situation where the retailer just needs additional training.“A lot of times what we see is perhaps a clerk is too busy to do the proper checks,” explained Porter. “Or in some cases, especially for bars and nightclubs, perhaps a bartender is relying upon someone outside the door checking ID’s as they come in.”Porter said it’s not their goal to put retailers out of business. “What we want to do is make sure they have the tools they need to prevent these kind of sales.”TABC says about 95% of the businesses they check are in compliance. They’ve done close to 120 stings over the past week here in the Houston region and Porter said they’ve only found a handful of violations.TABC Deputy Executive Director for Enforcement Robert Saenz said they want to ensure that any alcohol sold during the Spring Break season is done so safely and legally. They plan to continue their efforts heading into the summer months.“TABC will continue to serve as a resource for retailers who have questions about the law and its impact on their day-to-day operations,” added Saenz. 00:00 /00:46 Sharelast_img read more