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27Oct/19

Video: Rick Pitino Appears To Make Gesture Towards Kentucky Fan After Loss

first_imgRick Pitino flipping off Kentucky fans.Twitter/@Fine_and_TandyPretty much every edition of the Kentucky vs. Louisville basketball rivalry is intense, and today’s game certainly didn’t disappoint. The game featured technicals on both coaches, huge dunks and blocks, and a dramatic finish, resulting in a two-point UK win.After the game, multiple Kentucky fans claimed that Louisville head coach Rick Pitino flipped off someone in the crowd while leaving the court. Twitter user Seiver Tandy captured the incident on video. Pitino definitely appears to make a gesture after being taunted, but it is hard to really tell if he gave a fan the finger or not, at least based on this footage.I got Rick flipping off UK fans on video @KySportsRadio pic.twitter.com/VPgUbRGM9H— Seiver Tandy (@Fine_and_Tandy) December 26, 2015Pitino sent assistant Ralph Willard out to answer questions after the game, so we’ll have to wait some time to hear Pitino’s side of things. If he did, in fact, flip of a Kentucky fan, that is a really bad look for the Hall of Fame coach.[KSR]last_img read more

14Oct/19

Thunder Bay police turn to the province for help to stop gang

first_imgWillow FiddlerAPTN NewsThunder Bay police are seeking help from the province to try and slow the drug trafficking and gang violence in the city which includes a homicide last week.It was the city’s third homicide in two weeks and seventh this year.The latest was Geoffrey Corbeil, 35, who was originally from Lac Des Milles Lac First Nation northwest of Thunder Bay but has been in Thunder Bay for some time.Corbeil was known to police as a former Native Syndicate gang member and investigators say the killing was likely drug-related.In the last three weeks, police have made 22 drug arrests.“Now we’re seeing so much Fentanyl and as we all know very addictive, very dangerous and it’s just becoming more and more prevalent,” said Staff Sgt. Shawn Harrison.Earlier this week, police seized Fentanyl from two residences with an estimated street value of approximately $85,000.Many of the arrests involve people from southern Ontario and are known gang members.“They’re males and they’re usually in their early 20’s to mid 20’s,” said Harrison.Harrison said Thunder Bay and the surrounding area is a lucrative market for drug traffickers.He said the city has a lot of people with substance abuse issues – and that is what is attracting the gangs.“What these guys will do is sell or not sell them, provide them some drugs and at that point there’s an owe that’s required, right,” he said.“So to pay off your debt I’ll have to come in your house and almost essentially force their way into it and they’ll sell out of their residence.”Harrison said with gangs comes the violence that is associated with them.And the problem there he said, is that the violence is so bad that it is silencing victims.“They have a tendency to use violence. There’s also an intimidation factor they wield to keep people in line. We do find we do encounter large amounts of fear by people and thus having a hard time getting statements, witness statements, victim statements for that matter.”Harrison said they’ve been able to execute several search warrants in local city residences with the help of other police services in the region who are seeing the same problem.“They can charge more up in Thunder Bay for drugs than they can for in southern Ontario and even more so up in the northern communities. So we see that are they are moving out of the Thunder Bay area and thus the partnerships we made.”The Thunder Bay police requested assistance from the province in September.In a statement to APTN, the police chief said she recently sent a second letter to the province and so far no commitments have been made.A ministry spokesperson said they’ve received one letter but not a second.wfiddler@aptn.ca@willowblasizzolast_img read more

09Aug/19

Rep VerHeulen joined by first responders for Sept 11 ceremony

first_img08Sep Rep. VerHeulen joined by first responders for Sept. 11 ceremony Categories: News,VerHeulen News PHOTO INFORMATION: State Rep. Rob VerHeulen, of Walker, on Thursday hosted Sparta Fire Chief Jerold Bolen and Walker Fire Chief Robert Walker as his guest for the Michigan House’s annual Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the Capitol. The service remembers first responders and members of the military from Michigan who died in the line of duty in the past year. Pictured with Rep. VerHeulen are (from left) Kentwood Deputy Fire Chief Greg Ginebaugh, a guest of state Rep. Steven Johnson, of Wayland; Walker; Bolen; and Plainfield Fire Chief Steve McKellar, a guest of Rep. Chris Afendoulis, of Grand Rapids.#####last_img read more

19Jul/19

Study provides new understanding of rotavirus infections in newborns

first_img Source:https://www.bcm.edu/ Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 28 2018Using a multidisciplinary approach, an international team of researchers from several institutions, including Baylor College of Medicine, reveals that complex interactions between sugars and the microbiome in human milk influence neonatal rotavirus infection. Reported in the journal Nature Communications, this study provides new understanding of rotavirus infections in newborns and identifies maternal components that could improve the performance of live, attenuated rotavirus vaccines.”Rotavirus infection causes diarrhea and vomiting primarily in children younger than 5, with the exception of babies younger than 28 days of age, who usually have no symptoms. However, in some places, infections in newborns are associated with severe gastrointestinal problems. What factors mediate differences between newborns with and without symptoms are not clearly understood,” said first and corresponding author Dr. Sasirekha Ramani, assistant professor of molecular virology and microbiology at Baylor College of Medicine. “We began our investigation years ago by determining that a particular strain of rotavirus was associated with both asymptomatic infections and clinical symptoms in newborns.”Ramani and her colleagues first looked for answers from the perspective of the virus. They investigated whether factors such as the amount of virus in newborns or the genome of the virus could be linked to the presence of symptoms in newborns, but did not find any connection between those factors. The researchers then posed the question from the perspective of the newborn. Are there factors in newborns that could explain why this virus infects neonates and why there are differences in clinical presentation?In the lab, the researchers investigated whether components of the mother’s breast milk could inhibit infection of MA104 cells, a well-established model for rotavirus studies, with the particular strain of rotavirus they had identified in the neonatal nurseries in India. Unexpectedly, they discovered that specific sugars present in mother’s milk enhanced infection of cells in culture with the neonatal rotavirus strain.”We were surprised by these results,” Ramani said. “Breast milk is known to enhance newborn protection against rotavirus infection and sugars in breast milk can reduce infectivity of other rotaviruses, but here we found the opposite for this particular strain of the virus.”The researchers then went back to the field to determine whether they could validate the results they had found in the lab in a cohort of mother-infant pairs.Related StoriesGrowth problems in preterm infants associated with altered gut bacteria‘Stomach flu’ vaccine prevents type 1 diabetes in childrenGut-boosting food may put an end to childhood malnutrition worldwide”We found that some of the same specific sugars in breast milk that increase infectivity of cells in culture are present in the milk of mothers of newborns with symptomatic infection,” Ramani said.In addition, the researchers found an association between the microbiome in the mothers’ milk and gastrointestinal symptoms in newborns, which prompted new questions, Ramani explained. How does the microbiome contribute to the differences in gastrointestinal symptoms?”What is most interesting to us is that these sugars also increase the replication of the rotavirus attenuated, live vaccine that is similar to the neonatal virus that we are studying,” Ramani said. “Enhanced viral replication can potentially translate into a more effective immune response against the virus, which would lead to better protection for the infant. This is something we want to explore in the future because it could illuminate strategies to improve the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in parts of the world where they do not do well.””One of the most important things to us is that these unexpected findings are tightly linked to public health,” said co-author Dr. Mary K. Estes, Cullen Foundation Endowed Professor Chair of Human and Molecular Virology at Baylor College of Medicine and emeritus founding director of the Texas Medical Center Digestive Diseases Center. “The multidisciplinary nature of our team of researchers has allowed us to answer questions about how this unique rotavirus strain infects neonates, confirm the findings in the field and open possibilities to improve the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines where they are needed the most.””These discoveries are a prime example of the urgent need to improve our understanding of the composition and variation in breast milk components,” said co-author Dr. Lars Bode, associate professor of pediatrics and director and chair of Collaborative Human Milk Research at the Larsson-Rosenquist Foundation Mother-Milk-Infant Center of Research Excellence at the University of California, San Diego. “Understanding how rotavirus and other pathogens can take advantage of breast milk components will guide the development of new vaccination strategies to stay ahead in the host-pathogen arms race.”last_img read more

18Jul/19

Intel underfoot Floor sensors rise as retail data source

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Intel underfoot: Floor sensors rise as retail data source (2018, January 15) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-intel-underfoot-floor-sensors-retail.html More businesses are trying mobile apps to lure and keep consumers Online clicks give retailers valuable insight into consumer behavior, but what can they learn from footsteps? It’s a question Milwaukee-based startup Scanalytics is helping businesses explore with floor sensors that track people’s movements.The sensors can also be used in office buildings to reduce energy costs and in nursing homes to determine when someone falls. But retailers make up the majority of Scanalytics’ customers, highlighting one of several efforts brick-and-mortar stores are undertaking to better understand consumer habits and catch up with e-commerce giant Amazon.Physical stores have been at a disadvantage because they “don’t have that granular level of understanding as to where users are entering, what they’re doing, what shelves are not doing well, which aisles are not being visited,” said Brian Sathianathan, co-founder of Iterate.ai, a small Denver-based company that helps businesses find and test technologies from startups worldwide.But it’s become easier for stores to track customers in recent years. With Wi-Fi—among the earliest available options—businesses can follow people when they connect to a store’s internet. One drawback is that not everyone logs on so the sample size is smaller. Another is that it’s not possible to tell whether someone is inches or feet away from a product.Sunglass Hut and fragrance maker Jo Malone use laser and motion sensors to tell when a product is picked up but not bought, and make recommendations for similar items on an interactive display. Companies such as Toronto-based Vendlytics and San Francisco-based Prism use artificial intelligence with video cameras to analyze body motions. That can allow stores to deliver customized coupons to shoppers in real time on a digital shelf or on their cellphones, said Jon Nordmark, CEO of Iterate.ai.With Scanalytics, Nordmark said, “to have (the sensors) be super useful for someone like a retailer, they may need to power other types of things,” like sending coupons to customers.Scanalytics co-founder and CEO Joe Scanlin said that’s what his floor sensors are designed to do. For instance, the sensors read a customer’s unique foot compressions to track that person’s path to a digital display and how long the person stand in front of it before walking away, he said. Based on data collected over time, the floor sensors can tell a retailer the best time to offer a coupon or change the display before the customer loses interest. The next phase in data collection is right under your feet. In this photo taken Dec. 5, 2017, Scanalytics co-founder and CEO Joe Scanlin holds a smart floor sensor his company creates that track people’s movements in Milwaukee. The sensors are among the tools retailers are using to gain insights on consumer habits. (AP Photo/Ivan Moreno) Explore further “Something that in the moment will increase their propensity to purchase a product,” said Scanlin, 29, who started developing the paper-thin sensors that are 2-square feet (0.19-sq. meters) as a student at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater in 2012. He employs about 20 people.Wisconsin-based bicycle retailer Wheel and Sprocket uses Scanalytics’ sensors—which can be tucked under utility mats—to count the number of customers entering each of its eight stores to help schedule staff. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In this photo taken Dec. 5, 2017, Scanalytics co-founder and CEO Joe Scanlin holds a smart floor sensor his company creates that track people’s movements in Milwaukee. The sensors are among the tools retailers are using to gain insights on consumer habits. (AP Photo/Ivan Moreno) “That’s our biggest variable expense,” said co-owner Noel Kegel. “That sort of makes or breaks our profitability.”Kegel wants to eventually have sensors in more areas throughout his stores to measure where customers spend most of their time and what products are popular, but he said it’s too expensive right now.The cost of having the sensors ranges from $20 to $1,000 per month, depending on square footage and add-on applications to analyze data or interact with digital signs, Scanlin said. He said he’s working with 150 customers in the U.S. and other countries and estimates that about 60 percent are retailers.The emergence of tracking technologies is bound to raise concerns about privacy and surveillance. But Scanlin noted his sensors don’t collect personally identifying information.Jeffrey Lenon, 47, who was recently shopping at the Shops of Grand Avenue mall in Milwaukee, said he wasn’t bothered by the idea of stores tracking foot traffic and buying habits.”If that’s helping the retailer as far as tracking what sells and what no, I think it’s a good idea,” Lenon said.These technologies have not become ubiquitous in the U.S. yet, but it’s only a matter of time, said Ghose Anindya, a business professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business.”In a couple of years this kind of conversation will be like part and parcel of everyday life. But I don’t think we’re there yet,” he said.——A sampling of tracking technologies for traditional storesBrick-and-mortar retailers are using different tracking technologies to better understand their customers and keep up with e-commerce giant Amazon. Here is a sampling of the different tracking methods available to stores:FLOOR SENSORSPaper-thin tiles developed by Milwaukee-based Scanalytics measure foot compressions to analyze people’s movements over time so stores know what products displays draw customers’ attention and for how long. That allows businesses to study what sells, know when to schedule staff for busy times, and what store layout is most effective. The technology might still be too pricey for smaller retailers, however.INTELLIGENT VIDEO CAMERASCompanies such as Toronto-based Vendlytics and San Francisco-based Prism use artificial intelligence with video cameras to analyze body motions. That can allow stores to deliver customized coupons to shoppers in real-time on a digital shelf or on their cellphones on an app.MOTION SENSORSSunglass Hut and fragrance maker Jo Malone are using laser and motion sensors from Perch Interactive to tell when a product is picked up but not bought. The technology can also make recommendations for similar items on an interactive display.WI-FI BEACONSWi-Fi beacons can track customer movements—as long as they connect to the store’s internet. Because not everyone opts in, stores have a smaller sample size to analyze. Another drawback is that it’s not possible to tell whether a customer is inches or feet from a product. read more

18Jul/19

Sensors in public spaces can help create cities that are both smart

Overflowing bins are one way to spoil the amenity of public space, but sensors can now alert councils when bins need emptying. Credit: Wikimedia How are smart cities meant to meet citizen needs? Big data from a network of sensors can give managers and planners a real-time, big-picture overview of traffic flows, public transport patronage, and water and power use. However, the needs of people in the city must be met at both the meta and micro levels. To do this we need site-specific and real-time information on how people use and value public spaces. Smart technology can collect this information from public spaces. This involves asking questions such as who is using it, how, why and for how long?We are investigating these questions in collaboration with Street Furniture Australia and Georges River Council in New South Wales, with funding from the Commonwealth Smart Cities and Suburbs Program. As cities densify and apartment living becomes the norm, public outdoor spaces will be increasingly important for everyday socialisation, as well as special gatherings and celebrations. Planners and urban designers need to develop their understanding of exactly how these valuable public spaces work to maximise their social and functional amenity. What is the project about?The team will record the detailed use of two public spaces. At first, behaviour mapping will provide detailed observational information about what’s happening in both spaces. The team will then embed invisible digital sensors in and on street furniture. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The idea of smart public space is to maximise the public uses and benefits. Georges River Council is looking at ‘healthy living hardware’ that, for example, improves outdoor cooking facilities by including preparation areas and wash stations. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In another example, a seat or bench that is hardly being used could be broken or too exposed to weather, and so should be moved. Any lack of use by children or older people could indicate that the location is not child-friendly or not easily accessible, for example. Again, relocation might be considered.But what about the users of these spaces?Smart technology can help to transform the traditional user experience and enhance the capacity of public open space to support 21st-century city living. Think, for instance, of additions such as Wi-Fi or plugin points for laptops and phones.Cities around the world are exploring how technology can improve the management of public spaces and facilities and better connect residents with local facilities and events. In Tel Aviv, for example, residents are issued with the Digi Tel Card. The card gives live updates about:rates and discounts available at sport and recreation facilitieswhat is happening in the citypersonalised information based, for example, on cultural or music preferencesinformation about issues, such as roadworks or community events, that may disrupt streets. Tel Aviv’s DigiTel card connects residents to a personalised, interest-and-location-based digital communication network. Isn’t this technology rather intrusive?While the benefits are many, greater use of technology in parks and the public domain raises questions. Traditionally, urban parks and open spaces have been places where people go to “unwind”, so installing technological devices there may be seen as invasive. Some people may also feel uncomfortable about governments (albeit local ones) gaining data about them in a place where they want to relax. Additional questions relate to privacy, data ownership and how we can protect the technology from vandalism.As for concerns about surveillance, the world has changed and the public space realm has changed with it. Walk through any major Australian city CBD and you will be filmed on CCTV. Various smart card ticketing systems (Opal in NSW, myki in Victoria and go card in Queensland) provide a detailed record of everyone’s movements on public transport. Automatic numberplate scanners on tollways and in police cars are recording where we drive. Even in parks, devices such as mobile phones track our location. By comparison, the sensors on street furniture will be relatively non-invasive and will not identify individual people.The impetus for this research and data-gathering is to assist local government decision-making. By identifying and collecting relevant data, councils will have much-needed evidence to improve people’s lives as they use different public spaces. New scenarios can be identified, offering alternatives to provide support for different urban activities. It is hard to predict just how much will need to alter as our cities densify and we increasingly rely on public spaces to meet many of our social needs. By ensuring all the elements of the public realm are efficiently and appropriately serving residents’ needs, planning and design policies and practices will be able to shape 21st-century cities that are both smart and sociable. Citation: Sensors in public spaces can help create cities that are both smart and sociable (2018, April 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-sensors-spaces-cities-smart-sociable.html Explore further Provided by The Conversation Many people feel lonely in the city, but perhaps ‘third places’ can help with that In response to simple design changes, such as seating, the number of people visiting and staying in the space grew. So too did the diversity of visitors, with families and children coming into the space. This extra activity benefited nearby shops.So what can smart technology achieve?One example of smart furniture is smart bins. Street Furniture Australia already has a product with sensors that tell council maintenance crews how full the bin is and whether it needs to be emptied. This information could yield insights about how these bins are being used and when. We will target picnic tables, rubbish bins, barbecues, seats, cigarette ash receptacles, bubblers, power points and lights. The sensors will measure usage, including water and power consumption. They will also provide real-time messages to the council on whether, for example, an ash receptacle is overheating, or a street bollard is damaged.Information like this can be used to improve the amenity and user experience of public open spaces, as well as help to manage these spaces more efficiently. Our public spaces can be great social spaces, or merely places for through traffic. An experiment in Canberra’s Garema Place by Street Furniture Australia shows how such a thoroughfare can be turned around. read more

17Jul/19

Ahead of seatsharing talks in NDA JDU raises pitch

first_imgThis April 10, 2018 photograph shows Prime Minister Narendra Modi with Bihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar   –  Ranjeet Kumar June 04, 2018 SHARE Says Chief Minister Nitish Kumar is the ‘big brother’ in Bihar Ahead of a meeting between the BJP and its allies in Bihar later this week, the Janata Dal (United) on Monday asserted that its President, Chief Minister Nitish Kumar, is the “big brother” in the State, just as Prime Minister Narendra Modi is at the Centre.Speaking to BusinessLine after Kumar held a long meeting with JD(S) strategists including Pavan Varma and Prashant Kishore, party leader KC Tyagi said: “Nitish Kumar has the credibility and the experience in Bihar. He is the big brother in Bihar, just as the Prime Minister Narendra Modi is at the Centre.”Tyagi said the National Democratic Alliance (NDA), especially the BJP, had benefited from the credibility of Nitish Kumar, and that should not be ignored.The JD(U)’s posturing was clearly aimed at the other members of the NDA in the State — Ramvilas Paswan’s Lok Janshakti Party (LJP) and Upendra Kushwaha’s Rashtriya Lok Samata Party (RLSP) – who are angling for a bigger share of seats in the Lok Sabha elections next year.In this week’s meeting, scheduled in Patna on June 7, all the district-level party workers of the NDA will meet and discuss their future political course. After a setback in the recent by-polls in different States, the BJP’s allies have found an opportunity to strike at the national party to bargain for better seat allocation.The BJP has, however, played down the JD(S)’s posturing. Bihar Deputy Chief Minister Sushil Kumar Modi said there was no contradiction in the matter and that the people of the State preferred Nitish as Chief Minister and Narendra Modi as PM.“Desh ke PM Narendra Modi hain, lekin Bihar ke neta to Nitish Kumar hain. Isliye Bihar me jo vote milega wo Narendra Modi ke naam par, aur Nitish Kumar ke kaam ke naam par. Isme virodhabhash kahan hai (The PM is a national leader and Nitish Kumar is a leader in Bihar. People of Bihar would vote for both the leaders. Where is the contradiction here?),” said Sushil Modi while replying to questions on whether Nitish Kumar would be the NDA’s face in Bihar next year.He said the distribution of seats will be hammered out between the allies amicably. “Koi vivad nahi hai. Jab dil mil gaye, to seat kaun si badi cheej hai. Har chunav ke andar kaun kitna ladega, nahi ladega, ye saara jis din baithenge, saari chijon ka aelan ho jaayega (There is no controversy. When we have aligned, then seats will naturally be adjusted. When we sit together, everything will be decided amicably).” COMMENT Published on politics SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTSlast_img read more

17Jul/19

Rajinikanth not to contest TN Assembly bypoll

first_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL The actor is yet to launch his political outfit, though on December 31, 2017, he had announced that his political entry was sure to fructify. Top film star Rajinikanth on Sunday said he would not contest the bypoll expected to the Tamil Nadu Assembly, nearly a month after declaring that his target was only the Assembly election.While bypolls are expected to 21 Assembly constituencies in the state, Rajinikanth, when asked if he would fight the bypoll since he had declared the Assembly polls to be his only target, tersely said, “No.” The actor is yet to launch his political outfit, though on December 31, 2017, he had announced that his political entry was sure to fructify.To questions like which party he would support (in the bypolls), Rajinikanth told reporters at the airport here, “Sorry, I cannot say anything now.” Asked whether he had meant a national or a regional party when he had mentioned last month that only that party should be supported which would resolve the “water problem” of Tamil Nadu, he said, “Both.” On February 17, Rajinikanth had said “water is Tamil Nadu’s important problem” and asked his fans and people to vote for a party whom they thought would permanently resolve the issue by formulating and implementing projects.The jargon “water problem” is perceived as a reference to water scarcity in parts of the state and the vexed Cauvery issue as well.Rajinikanth had strongly pledged his support for interlinking rivers on more than one occasion in the past.The top actor had also said last month that he would not contest the upcoming Lok Sabha election.“Our target is only the Assembly polls. I am not supporting anyone,” he had said and barred anyone from using his images or the flag of the Rajini Makkal Mandram for political purposes. politics Published on Actor Rajinikanth.   –  The Hindu Tamil Nadu March 10, 2019 SHARE COMMENT COMMENTSlast_img read more