Jason Day Deserves An Ovation But Give The Field A Golf Clap

Heading into last weekend’s PGA Championship, Australia’s Jason Day had cracked the top five in nearly a third of the major championships he’d entered. He finished in the top 10 nearly half of the time. But he’d never hoisted one of those shiny trophies they give the tournament winner. That changed Sunday, when Day won the PGA Championship, breaking the record for lowest to-par score (-20) in a major.Yet Day’s record-shattering performance also highlights just how easy it was to go under par at the majors this season. While Day’s week at the PGA ranks No. 1 according to cumulative strokes below par, it’s nowhere near the best in modern history1Which, for the purposes of this article, began in 1958 — the first year the PGA Championship adopted a stroke-play format. if we examine it using our familiar z-score system, which measures each performance relative to the field (by how many standard deviations a player’s score was below the field average, for players who made the cut).Z-scores reward not only excellence relative to par, but also dominance in comparison to one’s peers on the same course at the same time. And Day’s competitors also shot very well when held up to Whistling Straits’ par-72 standard: The average of players who made the cut was 3.6 strokes under par, which ranks fifth-lowest of any major tournament since 1958. That number explains the big disconnect between Day’s amazing to-par score and his middling (by major-winning standards) z-score:Last weekend’s low-scoring PGA Championship also capped off a season of great performances by the field in majors. July’s British Open featured the lowest to-par scoring average (-5.6) of any major since 1958, and April’s Masters Tournament (-2.4) ranked 11th-lowest. Combined, this year’s quartet of majors saw the lowest scoring average (relative to par) of any season since 1958, and the only time in that span that the average cut-maker across all majors in a season was under par.The majors in 2014 ranked second-lowest, so we’re seeing an unprecedented spate of low-scoring performances in recent seasons, though it’s not clear what’s driving the trend. We can turn to the usual sources of speculation: technological improvements outstripping course designs, a (subconscious?) movement toward friendlier scoring conditions to improve golf as a television product, an incredible font of young talent emerging in the wake of Tiger Woods’s heyday, etc.Whatever the cause, it’s leading to players like Day going low on the game’s biggest stage, even if their performances aren’t historically great relative to their peers.He didn’t win the PGA Championship, but Jordan Spieth is still having one of golf’s greatest seasons. read more

Wilmingtons Symbotic To Host Open House During National Robotics Week

first_imgBOSTON, MA — In celebration of National Robotics Week (April 6-14, 2019), MassRobotics is hosting a series of statewide open houses at innovative robotics organizations shaping the new Massachusetts technology landscape and the state’s ever-growing robotics cluster.One of these open houses will take place at Symbotic (200 Research Drive) in Wilmington on Friday, April 12 at 11am. Learn more and register HERE.“Massachusetts is a global hub of robot technology development and innovation,” said Tom Ryden, executive director, MassRobotics. “As part of RoboWeek, we hope to increase the public awareness of the importance of the robotics industry in Massachusetts and its tremendous impact on the future by providing an inside look into some of the area’s robotics companies. These events are ideal for investors, those looking to advance their careers in robotics, government officials invested in the Commonwealth’s technology and innovation industry, and businesses interested in collaborating with these smart companies.”From Monday, April 8 to Friday, April 12, robot enthusiasts can get behind-the-scenes tours at Massachusetts’ best-known robotics companies, including:iRobot – Tour the Cool Stuff Museum and Family Innovation Lab, learn about the company and see a demo of a robot in action. Bedford, MA.6 River Systems – Learn about Chuck, a collaborative mobile robot, and how the company is building fulfillment solutions for the warehouses of tomorrow. Waltham, MA.DunkWorks – Part of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Center for Marine Robotics, see how DunkWorks is accelerating the path of technology to the ocean. Woods Hole, MA.Piaggio Fast Forward – Meet gita, the sustainable, mobile-carrier that follows people on the go while transporting up to 45 pounds and learn about the company’s vision of a sustainable mobility ecology with healthy lifestyles and social connectivity available to all. Boston, MA.Symbotic – Learn how to simplify material handling from manufacturer to store shelf with the combination of proprietary software and mathematics. Wilmington, MA.Artaic – Discover how Artaic is using robotic technology to customize, design and fabricate award-winning mosaics for projects of any size. Boston, MA.FLIR Unmanned Ground Systems – As the world’s leading provider of battle-tested Unmanned Ground Vehicles, get an inside look at how these robots help keep troops, first responders and the public safe. Chelmsford, MA.UMass Lowell NERVE and iHub – As part of the monthly Mass Innovation Nights event series, network with members of the local innovation community and view presentations by local startups and entrepreneurs. To register, visit https://mass.innovationnights.com/events/mass-innovation-nights-121. Lowell, MA.MassRobotics – Meet the masterminds behind the innovation hub for robotics and connected devices. Get a deep dive in how our programming is nurturing the next generation of talent and promoting economic growth. Boston, MA.For registration details, tour dates and times, click HERE.About MassRoboticsMassRobotics is the result of the collective work of a group of engineers, rocket scientists and entrepreneurs with a shared vision to create a strong, vibrant robotics and IoT ecosystem in Massachusetts. MassRobotics’ mission is to help create and scale the next generation of successful robotics and connected devices companies by providing entrepreneurs and innovative robotics/automation startups with the workspace and resources they need to develop, prototype, test and commercialize their products and solutions. See www.massrobotics.org for details.(NOTE: The above press release is from MassRobotics.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWhat’s Happening In Wilmington This Week (April 8-14)In “5 Things To Do Today”NOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of August 4, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of June 30, 2019)In “Business”last_img read more

Giant planet and brown dwarf discovered in a close binary system HD

first_imgJ and K band AO imaging of HD 87646 taken at Palomar observatory. Credit: Ma et al., 2016. (Phys.org)—An international team of astronomers reports the discovery of a giant planet and a brown dwarf in a close binary system designated HD 87646. The findings, described in a paper published Aug. 11 on arXiv.org, reveal that HD 87646 is the first close binary system with more than one substellar circum-primary companion known to date. Citation: Giant planet and brown dwarf discovered in a close binary system HD 87646 (2016, August 16) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-08-giant-planet-brown-dwarf-binary.html Explore further © 2016 Phys.org More information: Very Low-Mass Stellar and Substellar Companions to Solar-like Stars From MARVELS VI: A Giant Planet and a Brown Dwarf Candidate in a Close Binary System HD 87646 , arXiv:1608.03597 [astro-ph.EP] arxiv.org/abs/1608.03597AbstractWe report the detections of a giant planet (MARVELS-7b) and a brown dwarf candidate (MARVELS-7c) around the primary star in the close binary system, HD 87646. It is the first close binary system with more than one substellar circum-primary companion discovered to the best of our knowledge. The detection of this giant planet was accomplished using the first multi-object Doppler instrument (KeckET) at the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope. Subsequent radial velocity observations using ET at Kitt Peak National Observatory, HRS at HET, the “Classic” spectrograph at the Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope at Fairborn Observatory, and MARVELS from SDSS-III confirmed this giant planet discovery and revealed the existence of a long-period brown dwarf in this binary. HD 87646 is a close binary with a separation of ∼22 AU between the two stars, estimated using the Hipparcos catalogue and our newly acquired AO image from PALAO on the 200-inch Hale Telescope at Palomar. The primary star in the binary, HD 87646A, has Teff = 5770±80K, log(g)=4.1±0.1 and [Fe/H] = −0.17±0.08. The derived minimum masses of the two substellar companions of HD 87646A are 12.4±0.7MJup and 57.0±3.7MJup. The periods are 13.481±0.001 days and 674±4 days and the measured eccentricities are 0.05±0.02 and 0.50±0.02 respectively. Our dynamical simulations show the system is stable if the binary orbit has a large semi-major axis and a low eccentricity, which can be verified with future astrometry observations. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. HD 87646, located around 240 light years away, is a bright G-type star with a fainter K-type stellar companion. The primary star in the system, HD 87646A, is about 12 percent more massive than the sun and has a radius of about 1.55 solar radii. The system has a separation of only 22 AU between the two stars.A team of researchers, led by Bo Ma of the University of Florida, has been observing HD 87646 since 2006 using a set of telescopes. The scientists employed the W.M. Keck Exoplanet Tracker (KeckET), at the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) 2.5m telescope, mounted on the Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico to reveal the presence of a new giant planet that received designation HD 87646b. KeckET is a new generation multiple object Doppler instrument, capable of simultaneously observing more than 50 stars.The planetary status of HD 87646b was confirmed thanks to the radial velocity observations conducted by utilizing the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) in Arizona, the High-Resolution Spectrograph at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope (HET) in Texas, the “Classic” spectrograph at the Automatic Spectroscopic Telescope, mounted on the Fairborn Observatory in Arizona and the Multi-object APO Radial Velocity Exoplanet Large-area Survey (MARVELS) at SDSS. Moreover, these observations allowed the researchers to detect new even larger companion in the system – a brown dwarf designated HD 87646c.”Our SDSS MARVELS pilot survey and additional observations at the HET, KPNO 2.1m telescope, and Fairborn Observatory confirm the detection of two massive substellar companions in a close binary system HD 87646,” the team wrote in the paper.According to the study, HD 87646b has a minimum mass of about 12.4 Jupiter masses and an orbital period of approximately 13.5 days. HD 87646c is much more massive, having 57 Jupiter masses and much longer orbital period, circling the star every 673 days.The team also conducted dynamical simulations of the system, which allowed them to draw conclusions that HD 87646 is stable if it has a large binary semi-major axis and a relatively low binary eccentricity.However, the question of how this system was formed still baffles the authors of the paper. Given the fact that HD 87646 is the first known system to have two massive substellar objects orbiting a star in a close binary and the masses of the two objects are close to the minimum masses for burning deuterium and hydrogen, these peculiarities raise questions about the system’s formation and evolution.”The large masses of these two substellar objects suggest that they could be formed as stars with their binary hosts: a large molecular cloud collapsed and fragmented into four pieces; the larger two successfully became stars and formed the HD 87646 binary, and the other smaller ones failed to form stars and became the substellar objects in this system. This scenario might be relevant for the binary stars but seems problematic for the two substellar objects on orbits within one AU because it is unclear whether fragmentation on such a small scale can occur,” the paper reads.Other hypothesis offered by the scientists is that the two newly discovered giant objects were formed like giant planet in a protoplanetary disk around HD 87646A. However, they added that such massive disks are rare in close binaries, and further investigation is needed to confirm this explanation. Astronomers discover new substellar companion to the Pleiades member starlast_img read more