Finally, a contest to reward the world’s crappiest fighting robots

first_imgRelated Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Follow the Puck Tags:#Arduino#Hebocon#japan#Maker Faire#robotics#robots#Tokyo Since the first competition held in 2014 in Tokyo, Hebocon has spread over 25 countries and over 60 competitions has been hosted. In the latest International contest in August, participants hailed from Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Singapore, Iceland, France and Hungary. It’s easy to mock the Hebocon awards for comedy effect alone, but the reality is that they bring robotics (albeit in it’s most primitive form) to those who either lack technical ability or might be creatively or technically blocked. As the creators encourage:” Go into a toy store and buy one of those moving toy dogs, rip off its exterior, and stick some cardboard on there, and you’d be looking at your original robot. Get some pieces of wood, sharpen them, and give your robot some horns: your robot’s attacking ability has just sky-rocketed. You might even get more creative and install a motorized weapon onto your robot. Didn’t quite work side effects of viagra and alcohol out? That’s Okay! That is what we call Heboi. Grab that faulty robot of yours, and participate in a Hebocon competition!”With sponsors like Arduino and Maker Faire and a cult following, it brings a sort of robotics to the masses. Cate Lawrence “If one crappy robot and another crappy robot fought each other — what would happen?”In an era where robots like Nao, Pepper, Sophia and Atlas manage to amaze us with their respective abilities to walk, learn, communicate in different languages,  recognize different people and partake in heavy lifting, another suite of robots is hard at work lowering the bar of robotic achievement.Hebocon is an annual robot competition for the technically ungifted where 31 robots compete in sumo style wrestling matches where the robots try to push their competitors off a board through a combination of pushing, shoving, whirring and sheer persistence. The biggest challenge can be getting robots to move at all, let alone deliver attack moves and self-defence techniques.  The World Championship was recently held in Tokyo.See also: Will robots finally take farmers’ jobs?The word Hebocon derives from the Japanese word Heboi, used to describe something that is technically poor, or low in quality and with this spirit in mind, robots are made with a bizarre array of equipment including fast food wrappers, instant noodle containers, sex toys, wind up toys and Barbie dolls.  According to the organisers, “entrants will need compromise and surrender instead of ideas and technical skill.” Robots are actually penalised for having high tech features and assistance from the maker is not unusual in the competition, such as a helping finger to get the robot moving when a motor has failed. It a competition where failures in technical output can be thwarted by strategy and dogged persistence.The souls of robots that would be considered scrapheap fodder are respected, as winners in each round opt to attach parts of the losing robots to ‘carry on the will’ of those knocked out.Hong Kong representative Kit da Studio won the NicoTsuku award with his table-flipping robot. (The robot actually flipped itself over when it was trying to flip the desk.) Overall winner, Ricky Chan, built a robot called the “Robot-Controlled Controller Robot,” which consists of two components – a controller that looks like a tiger robot, and a robot that looks like a controller. How Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua…last_img read more

March 24 2017PR Coordinator SeanPaul VonAncken a

first_imgMarch 24, 2017PR Coordinator Sean-Paul VonAncken and maintenance manager Jeff Fisher are having fun putting lightbulbs into lightstrings in preparation to a wedding.[photos by Sue Kirsch]The strings of lights were installed in the Vaults.More to come.last_img

Swedenbased TV service provider Boxer had 337000

first_imgSweden-based TV service provider Boxer had 337,000 pay TV customers in Denmark, up from 71,000 a year earlier, and 250,000 customers to its Plus TV service in Finland, up from 240,000, at the end of the first quarter.The company said it had seen a slowing down of the decline in numbers for its Swedish service Boxer TV, which dropped by 4,000 in the three months to March to 613,000, down from 635,000 a year earlier. Boxer now has about 1.2 million pay TV customers across the region.Broadcast services provider Teracom Sweden’s revenues rose from SEK352 million (€40 million) in the first quarter of 2011 to SEK358 million for the last quarter, with operating income more or less flat at SEK108 million, while Boxer TV Sweden’s revenues grew from SEK484 million to SEK497 million, and operating income grew from SEK55 million to SEK63 million.Boxer Denmark had revenues of SEK 180 million and an operating loss of SEK64 million for the first quarter, while Plus TV posted revenues of SEK143 million an operating loss of SEK18 million.last_img read more