Residents want change in Caltrans road project

first_img“We’re finding out about this thing last,” said Carrie Scoville, a member of the Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council who led discussions at Tuesday night’s informal meeting. Caltrans representatives were unable to attend Tuesday’s meeting, but Caltrans spokeswoman Maria Raptis said that the agency tried to inform residents about the landscaping work before it began. “We did go door-to-door handing out fliers to those who are most impacted by the project,” she said, defining that group as the “immediate neighbors.” Scoville and the approximately 10 residents, most of whom live adjacent the area being landscaped, suggested that, among other things, Caltrans plant low-maintenance vegetation, notify neighbors before work is done, put down fabric to guard against wind and water erosion and prioritize work to plant near houses first. “Caltrans now knows that we exist,” Scoville said, noting that agency representatives are taking another look at their plans after getting negative feedback from residents at an Aug. 14 neighborhood council meeting. By Rachel Jones STAFF WRITER A small group of San Pedro residents dissatisfied with Caltrans handling of the ongoing planting and irrigation project along SR-47 and the 110 freeway met and suggested changes in the plan earlier this week. The goal of the $2 million overhaul is to improve the roadside landscaping, both functionally and aesthetically, on Route 47 from Gaffey Street to Harbor Boulevard, and on Route 110 from Gaffey Street to Channel Street. Clearing of the old plants and brush – which neighbors say was neglected for years – began this summer and upset residents who say they were not informed of the plans. Raptis confirmed that the plans are being modified slightly. “I wouldn’t say it’s being revamped, but we are changing the placement of the trees,” she said. “Some \ want shade and some want the view, so we’re going to be placing them differently.” As for implementing the suggestions made by those at Tuesday’s meeting, Raptis said they are open to ideas but must also abide by agency conventions. “Community input is very important to Caltrans in all of our activities, but there is a balance to what we must achieve,” she said. The Caltrans project will be discussed at the Sept. 11 Central San Pedro Neighborhood Council meeting, at 6:30 p.m. in a new location at the Port of Los Angeles High School auditorium. rachel.jones@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

Two Donegal charities receive over €1000 from LYIT Students’ Union

first_imgMore than €1000 has been raised by the Letterkenny Institute of Technology Student Union for two Donegal charities. A number of recent events and campaigns including the Student Achievement Awards and the Formal Ball have raised a grand total of €1080.00 for the two worthy charities.At the start of each academic year, two charities are chosen by the students. The charities chosen this year were Multiple Sclerosis Ireland (Donegal Branch) and the Donegal Hospice.Earlier this week, the two charities were presented with a total of €540.00 each.LYIT Student Union thanked the students and staff members who contributed in any way, throughout the academic year, for the two charities.Josephine Wilson, Student Union Administrator LYIT. Grace Boyle, Donegal Hospice. Kathleen Harkin, Donegal Hospice. Paul Lynch, LYIT SU President.William Daly, LYIT SU Welfare Officer. Charlie McLaughlin, MS Ireland (Donegal Branch). Josephine Wilson, Student Union Administrator LYIT. Two Donegal charities receive over €1000 from LYIT Students’ Union was last modified: July 5th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

#SheSpeaks by Lady Nam: Find Your Voice with Nambitha Ben-Mazwi

first_imgPlay Your Part ambassador, Nambitha Ben-Mazwi, affectionately known as Lady Nam is an entertainer and philanthropist with a passion for community development. Lady Nam’s philanthropy is driven by a longing to make a positive impact in society using her personal brand and platform to reach out, educate and empower young girls and women.“Girls compete with girls, but women empower other women” says Lady Nam.Most notably, Lady Nam has created a platform for engagement on social media called #SheSpeaks by Lady Nam. This initiative aims to uplift young girls and women by encouraging them to find their voices in their careers and personal lives using #SheSpeaks by Lady Nam. Discussions address topics such as financial management, entrepreneurship, career guidance, spirituality, health and beauty.The initiative lives off social media and is amplified through various face-to-face interactions that Lady Nam has with experts from various fields, her entertainment industry peers and her mentees.“#SheSpeaks by Lady Nam is a women’s movement. It’s about empowering young girls and women. It’s about women finding their voice and after finding their voice, it’s about them walking, speaking and living their purpose.” says Lady Nam.Follow Lady Nam on YouTube to find out how you can get involved and find your voice.last_img read more

What’s in store for 2016 corn and soybeans?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest This “spring,” the weather has gone from snow and 24 degrees to sunny and 80 degrees within one week. This unusual weather leaves many of us wondering what’s in store for the remainder of the growing season.In general, unfavorable weather conditions tend to affect soybean yield much less compared to corn yield. In 2012, when we experienced a hot, dry summer, corn yield was reduced by 23% while soybean yield was only reduced by 8% (see the table below). However, under more optimum weather conditions, corn yield gains are much greater compared to soybean. With more ideal weather in 2013 and 2014, corn yield increased 12-14% while soybean yield only increased 2-8%.Table 1. Corn and soybean grain yield averages for Ohio compared to the 5-year average (data from USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service).Corn (bu/acre)Soybean (bu/acre)2015153 (-1%)50 (+2%)2014176 (+14%)53 (+8%)2013174 (+12%)50 (+2%)2012120 (-23%)45 (-8%)2011153 (-1%)48 (-2%)5-Year Ave.15549SoybeansDespite the weather, the state soybean yield does not tend to fluctuate much. Soybean vegetative and reproductive stages overlap allowing the soybean plant to compensate for short periods of stress (see the figure). In 2012, while plants were stunted and there was an increased number of flower abortion due to hot/dry weather conditions, soybean yield was “saved” in many areas of the state due to rainfall in August and September promoting seed fill.  (This was especially true of our later maturing varieties.)CornWith the weather forecast calling for “slightly-above” normal temperatures and “slightly below precipitation” for the remainder of April and similar conditions for May, this year offers an opportunity to plant corn at optimum calendar dates for yield. The recommended time for planting corns across Ohio is mid-April through about the first week of May. Grain yield and test weight are increased by early plantings, whereas grain moisture is reduced, thereby allowing earlier harvest and reducing drying costs. In central Ohio, yields decline approximately 1 to 1.5 bushels per day for planting delayed beyond the first week of May. Early planting generally produces shorter plants with better standability. Delayed planting increases the risk of frost damage to corn and may subject the crop to greater injury from various late insect and disease pest problems, such as European corn borer and gray leaf spot. With earlier planting, vegetative growth is usually complete and pollination initiated prior to the period of greatest moisture stress in July and grain filling occurs during the periods when solar radiation is high which promotes greater accumulation of dry matter in the grain.No-tillage corn can be planted at the same time as conventional, if soil conditions permit. In reality, however, planting may often need to be delayed several days to permit extra soil drying. Corn should be planted only when soils are dry enough to support traffic without causing soil compaction. The yield reductions resulting from “mudding the seed in” may be much greater than those resulting from a slight planting delay. Moreover, given the weather projections for drier and warmer conditions than normal, even with such delays, the crop may be planted before the optimum plant date window ends.There have been occurrences in past years when early to mid-April planting were adversely affected by an abrupt transition from warm, dry conditions to freezing rains and snow. When dry corn seed absorbs cold water as a result of a cold rain or melting snow, “imbibitional chilling injury” may result. Such injury in corn seed can lead to delayed seedling growth and reduced stands so planting right before such large temperature swings should be avoided.Appropriate planting depths for corn vary with soil and weather conditions. There is a perception that shallow planting depths (less than 1.5 inches) are appropriate for early plantings — when soil conditions are usually cool and moist — because seed will emerge more rapidly due to warmer soil temperatures closer to the surface. However, planting shallower than 1.5 inches is generally not recommended at any planting date or in any soil type. Recent Ohio studies that evaluated corn response to seeding depth provide no evidence to support shallow plantings. For normal conditions plant corn at 1.5 to 2-inches deep to provide frost protection and allow for adequate root development. When corn is planted 1.5 to 2 inches deep, the nodal roots develop about 0.5 to 0.75 inches below the soil surface. At planting depths less than 1 inch, the nodal roots develop at or just below the soil surface. Excessively shallow planting can cause slow, uneven emergence due to soil moisture variation, and rootless corn (“floppy corn syndrome”) when hot, dry weather inhibits nodal root development. Shallow plantings increase stress and result in less developed roots, smaller ears and reduced yields.last_img read more

Mato Grosso Cotton Planting Up

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Chris ClaytonDTN Ag Policy EditorCUIABA, Brazil (DTN) — While corn remains the major safrinha crop for Brazilian farmers, more cotton acreage is being planted in Mato Grosso this spring, as well.Over the past two years, cotton planting has increased by nearly one-third for the safrinha (second crop) in Mato Grosso. The Institute for Mato Grosso Economics of Agriculture (IMEA) forecasts Mato Grosso farmers will plant 1.1 million hectares (2.71 million acres) of cotton this spring. The Brazilian Association of Cotton Producers (Abrapa) forecast cotton acreage to grow to 1.4 million hectares (3.46 million acres). Mato Grosso accounts for about 88% of Brazil’s cotton production.China is the top market for Brazilian cotton, and a 25% tariff on U.S. cotton creates expectation that continued trade disruption between the U.S. and China will be to Brazil’s advantage.Still, corn acreage in Mato Grosso is projected to remain steady at 4.7 million hectares (11.6 million acres). Harvest is projected at 28.6 million metric tons, or just under 1.13 billion bushels, according to IMEA.Farmers in other states rely more heavily on corn than cotton for the safrinha crop. Overall, Brazil is expected to plant 12.6 million hectares (31.1 million acres) of corn.Farms owned by Brazil’s largest agribusiness, Amaggi Group, are shifting acreage more heavily to cotton from corn this spring. A manager at an Amaggi farm outside Campo Novo do Parecis told a group of American farmers late last week that the farm was planting 98,800 acres into cotton and just 12,350 acres into corn. That’s basically a reversal from last year when the farm planted 74,100 acres into corn.Amaggi has seven farms in Mato Grosso with 300,000 planted hectares (741,000 acres) in the state, as well as 90,000 hectares (222,300 acres) in mandatory reserve.The manager said all three Amaggi farms in the south-central region of Mato Grosso were moving more heavily into cotton. Amaggi also is increasing its investments in cotton ginning and storage, as well.One possible reason for some farmers planting more cotton this year in Mato Grosso is a new state tax of 0.50 reals on each bag of corn sold, which equates to 2.2 bushels. Farmers are paid 19 reals per bag, ($2.33 a bushel right now based on the exchange rate of $1 equaling 3.7 reals).As Brazilian farmers boost their cotton acreage, the National Cotton Council in Memphis released some economic analysis for 2019 over the weekend. NCC projects U.S. farmers will plant 14.5 million acres of cotton, up 2.9% from a year ago, according to Jody Campiche, NCC’s vice president of economics and policy analysis.World cotton production is estimated to increase by 7 million bales in 2019 to 125.5 million bales, which would be the highest level since the 2011 crop. Each bale amounts to 480 pounds.NCC notes that, “Prior to the implementation of tariffs, the United States was in a prime position to capitalize on the increase in Chinese cotton exports.” Now, Brazil, Australia and other countries have gained market share. Vietnam was the top market in 2018 for U.S. cotton, followed by China and Mexico.China has lowered its reserves and is expected to increase imports to 11.1 million bales, NCC forecasts. The U.S. also is expected to increase cotton exports to 17.4 million bales in 2019, which would be the second only to 2005 if realized.Chris Clayton can be reached at Chris.Clayton@dtn.comFollow him on Twitter @ChrisClaytonDTN(AG/BAS)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Cinematography Tips For Horror Filmmakers

first_imgHorror is a very specific genre that calls for some unique lighting techniques. These five cinematography tips will make just about any horror film more stylized and effective.Horror films are all about tone, texture, and mood. Unlike many other genres that rely more heavily on other elements (dialogue, plot points, etc.), great horror films are all about style. That’s not to imply that a great horror film shouldn’t also have excellent dialogue and a great plot, but rather that those elements often take a back seat to the immersive mood and experience that a great horror film delivers.The two most important elements in creating that mood are sound design and cinematography, the latter being what we’re going to focus on here. Unlike lighting a comedy or drama, more rules can often be broken when shooting a horror film, and in many cases that translates to a more effective final product.If you plan on shooting some horror material in the future, then this article is for you. The five cinematography tips listed below will serve as some fundamental guidelines that you can follow throughout your time on set:1. Shoot Through ThingsIn the context of a horror film, this benign scene becomes something more sinister. Image from ShutterstockSome horror filmmakers are drawn to extreme closeups, but in my opinion doing the exact opposite is far more effective. Rather than always filling up your frame with your actors faces (just because it looks intense), challenge yourself to go wider.Imagine a scene where an actor is sitting alone in their kitchen. An extreme closeup on their face may show us some added emotion, but a wide shot taken from outside the house (looking in) could be far more powerful. Not only are you showing the isolation of the character, but you’re also creating a voyeuristic and unsettling feeling by shooting through a pane of glass, which is a technique that can be very effective under the right conditions.2. UnderexposeDavid Fincher’s Zodiac. Underexposed and super scary. Image from IMDbAs DPs, we have it drilled in our heads to always expose perfectly. We have more tools than ever (both in camera and otherwise) that enable us to nail our exposure. Though, in some cases, that isn’t what’s going to serve the story most effectively. On a horror film, underexposing can be extremely effective as it’ll leave more areas of the frame in the shadows and create a more mysterious feeling.Although you could technically expose normally and just color grade your footage to darken it in post, the end result won’t be quite the same. You want to actually light your scene in a way that feels organically underexposed, and bring that out even more in the grade. Don’t push things too far though, or you won’t be able to bump it back up in post if needed. About a stop of underexposure is all you need to set the tone.3. Use HazeEven the Exorcist is made scarier by fog. Image from IMDbUsing a tasteful amount of haze (or fog) can add a lot of texture to your scene. This is one of the oldest tricks in the book, but it’s still used on nearly every set (and for good reason). There’s absolutely no substitute for the look and feel that haze can bring to your scene, and it’s especially effective when it comes to the horror genre.Use a hazer or fog machine to add just a touch of haze to your scene, and be sure not to go overboard. A little bit of haze will go a long way, and much like underexposing, it can really help to set a unique and mysterious mood to your scenes.4. Don’t Be Afraid of Colored GelsBeyond the Black Rainbow. Below the Red Gel. Image from IMDbI almost always avoid using colored gels when shooting, unless I’m using them to correct the color temperature of a light (for example, balancing tungsten to daylight). That said, if I’m ever going to use them, it’s on a horror film, as that’s one of the only genres where I feel they can work exceptionally well.Red gels in particular can be really effective for horror, as the color red can inherently make your viewers feel unnerved. Avoid using colored gels in the way that a photographer might (such as on the rim light) and instead use them on your key. Let’s say you’ve got a scene that takes place in a dark hallway of a club. If your key light has a red gel on it, it will bleed over the faces of your actors and create a really stylized look. Again, know when to use this and when not to. If you mix colored gels with regular lighting (or natural light) you may just wind up with a strange looking image.5. Find Unique AnglesSome films are horrifying for different reasons. Image from IMDbThe most obvious example of a unique angle that works well for horror is the dutch tilt, though just about any unconventional angle can help play into the vibe of your film. Much like the other tips on this list, you want to use your camera angles to create an unsettling feeling within the viewer, and the best way to do that is to create an image that looks off balance. That’s why the dutch tilt works so well.Other examples would be a bird’s eye view or a very low angle shot looking up. Both of these are unique perspectives that we rarely see on film, and can really help to jolt the audience into the headspace of the characters. Always be sure that whatever extreme camera angle you’re going for still suits your scene, as the last thing you want is to stylize a scene or moment in a way that isn’t true to the story.Here are a few more thoughts, tips, and tricks from PremiumBeat dealing with the subject of cinematography:Cinematography Tip: Use Fog To Add Depth to Your ShotThe Art of Perspective and Symmetry in CinematographyPainting With Light: How To Fundamentally Approach The Craft Of CinematographyWhat are your favorite horror-centric cinematography techniques? Let us know in the comments below!last_img read more

Womens Entrepreneurship A No Ceilings Conversation with Chelsea Clinton

first_imgOn Monday, April 6, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton will join Jack Dorsey, CEO of Square, the Chairman of Twitter, and a founder of both, to host Women’s Entrepreneurship: A No Ceilings Conversation at Spelman College.They will be joined by Beverly Daniel Tatum, President of Spelman College, Tina Wells, CEO of Buzz Marketing, Cherita Kempson, Co-Founder of Endulge Cupcakes, Spelman students and local business owners to discuss what works in women’s entrepreneurship.New data recently released by No Ceilings finds that critical barriers to women’s full economic participation remain — both in the United States and abroad. Monday’s event will highlight the ways in which new technologies are empowering small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs. It will also discuss how young women in STEM can excel through programs like College Code Camp — a five-day immersion program that brings together women engineering students to build a stronger community around women in technology.Women’s Entrepreneurship: A No Ceilings Conversation is the continuation in a series of live and virtual discussions designed to hear directly from women and girls, as well as men and boys, about how to support and expand opportunities for all. This conversation follows the release of the No Ceilings Full Participation Report on March 9, which analyzes data from more than 190 countries on the gains made for women and girls over the last twenty years, and the gaps that still remain, as well as the No Ceilings Full Participation Plan, which provides a roadmap to close gaps in full participation.WHATWomen’s Entrepreneurship: A No Ceilings ConversationWHOChelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton FoundationJack Dorsey, CEO of Square, the Chairman of Twitter, and a founder of bothBeverly Daniel Tatum, President of Spelman CollegeTina Wells, CEO, Buzz MarketingCherita Kempson, Co-Founder, Endulge CupcakesWHENMonday, April 6, 20154:30 PM ETWHERESpelman College, Science Center Auditorium350 Spelman Ln SWAtlanta, GA 30314last_img read more