U.K. company sees potential for 20MW offshore wind turbine within three years

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Recharge:Rare-earth-free permanent magnet generators (PMG) for offshore wind turbines with nameplates of 20MW are expected to be a reality “within three years,” following trials of a new-generation concept at the UK Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) Catapult facility.A 250kW version of the axial-flux design being developed by GreenSpur Wind, which uses ferrites – an iron-rich ceramic – for its magnets, would be part of a four-module 1MW unit that is foreseen to be scalable to a power rating roughly twice that of the biggest PMGs in service today.“It was our intention from the outset to design a generator that could be scaled for the next generation of offshore wind turbines,” said Hugh-Peter Kelly, GreenSpur’s head of technology and the inventors of the design. “The feedback that we’ve received is that current designs have known limitations and new concepts will be needed to deliver next generation 20MW offshore wind turbines.”GreenSpur is now moving forward with modelling for “significantly bigger, multi-megawatt generators”, with the target of designing a 12MW-plus concept for offshore turbine created by “stacking” three 4MW units in parallel.Replacing high-price rare-earth materials with ferrites – a waste material produced in steel-making – would cut the cost of PMG magnets from £40/kg ($50/kg) to around £1/kg, according to GreenSpur calculations, meaning the design could carve around 33% out of the capital cost of direct-drive generator, and so almost 5% off the price of a turbine.More: Offshore wind turbine 20MW generator ready ‘within three years’ U.K. company sees potential for 20MW offshore wind turbine within three yearslast_img read more

Anti-euthanasia campaigner documents brain cancer battle in film

first_imgStuff co.nz 8 April 2019Family First Comment: “Now understanding it was the depression that is a natural bedfellow for terminal illness that made her ever think it was a good idea to hasten her death, she is making a last-ditch plea to stop the End of Life Choice Bill progressing.” www.Protect.org.nz Tokomaru woman Vicki Walsh has well and truly out-lived her life insurance payout.Diagnosed with the brain cancer glioblastoma multiforme nearly eight years ago, the prognosis was that she would be dead in 12 to 148 months.She nearly was.Not from the cancer, but by her own hand.She had the pills laid out on the kitchen bench, ready to end the suffering, but changed her mind over a cup of tea.Now understanding it was the depression that is a natural bedfellow for terminal illness that made her ever think it was a good idea to hasten her death, she is making a last-ditch plea to stop the End of Life Choice Bill progressing.On Tuesday, the day Parliament’s Justice Committee is due to report back ahead of a likely vote on May 1, the DefendNZ lobby group’s documentary about her remarkable survival will be released.Called Terminal but not dead yet, Walsh’s story explains her fear that the change of law would make vulnerable ill and disabled people feel worthless, selfish for continuing to be “a burden” and pressured to ask someone to end their lives.READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/111835457/choosing-life-despite-a-terminal-diagnosislast_img read more