Tag Archives: 杭州楼凤

07Nov/19

World Cup Match Reports

first_imgStay tuned to this story as the reports will be updated in the coming hours. Men’s 40’sAustralia has narrowly lost the Men’s 40’s division to New Zealand at the 2011 World Cup, 5-4 in an exciting encounter.Australia took an early lead when John Clark scored following a Troy Morgan run from acting half, but New Zealand were quick to hit back, levelling the score in the next set of six. New Zealand great Pete Walters sent a worry through the New Zealand camp when he looked to be injured, but was soon back on the field and back to his best, setting up a touchdown and helping New Zealand jump ahead to a 3-1 lead. Despite a number of penalties, Australia was unable to capitalise on its opportunities. .New Zealand took their two touchdown advantage into half-time, 3-1. Australia hit back soon after the half-time break, when Robin Kildare setting up John Samin to bring the score back to one touchdown, 3-2. Two quick touchdowns to New Zealand took their lead out to three with just over five minutes remaining. Troy Morgan scored in the next set of six, to bring New Zealand’s lead back to two, and when a New Zealand player was sent to the sin bin with just minutes remaining, Australia capitalised. Robert Sinclair-Smith scored during this time to bring his team back within one touchdown. The Australian comeback was too little too late however, with the siren sounding, giving New Zealand the win, 5-4.Men’s 35’sAustralia has continued it undefeated run at the 2011 World Cup, defeating South Africa, 11-6 in the Men’s 35’s division.The two sides had played each other twice in the lead up to the final, once in the round games and the other in yesterday’s quarter final, which were both won by Australia. Australia got out to a flying start, scoring the first three touchdowns of the match before South Africa got on the scoreboard midway through the first half and went into half-time with a comprehensive lead. Australia continued its dominance after the break, to take the match by five touchdowns and become Australia’s first World Cup champions for 2011.  Men’s 30’s Australia has comprehensively beaten England in the grand final of the Men’s Open division at the 2011 World Cup, taking the game 18-2. After a week of Touch Football that including plenty of high scores from the team, including a 31 touchdown win earlier in the week, the win was a great way for the teams to finish their World Cup campaign. The team didn’t waste any time getting on the scoreboard, making their mark on the game in the early exchanges. Captain Gavin Shuker led by example, scoring five touchdowns for the match.Senior MixedAustralia has pushed New Zealand all the way in the Senior Mixed division, taking the game to a drop off before losing 7-6. Australia got out to an impressive start, before New Zealand hit back to get back into the game. After leading 3-1, New Zealand hit back in the late stages of the first half, with Australia going to the half-time break up by one touchdown. New Zealand hit back in the early stages of the second half, with the teams continuing their great rivalry right down to the dying seconds, sending the game into a drop off. Both teams were unable to score in their first set of six, and it was New Zealand who eventually has the opportunity to capitalise, scoring in the first two minutes to take the title.last_img read more

19Jul/19

Promising technology could improve detection diagnosis of fatal ovarian cancer

first_imgReviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 14 2018Ovarian cancer claims the lives of more than 14,000 in the U.S. each year, ranking fifth among cancer deaths in women. A multidisciplinary team at Washington University in St. Louis has found an innovative way to use sound and light, or photoacoustic, imaging to diagnose ovarian tumors, which may lead to a promising new diagnostic imaging technique to improve current standard of care for patients with ovarian cancer.Quing Zhu, professor of biomedical engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science and of radiology, and a team of physicians and researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis recently conducted a pilot study using co-registered photoacoustic tomography with ultrasound to evaluate ovarian tumors on 16 patients at the School of Medicine and Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Results of the study were recently published online in Radiology.”When ovarian cancer is detected at an early, localized stage — stage 1 or 2 — the five-year survival rate after surgery and chemotherapy is 70 to 90 percent, compared with 20 percent or less when it is diagnosed at later stages, 3 or 4,” said Zhu, a pioneer of combining ultrasound and near-infrared imaging modalities for cancer diagnosis and treatment assessment. “Clearly, early detection is critical, yet due the lack of effective screening tools only 20-25 percent of ovarian cancers are diagnosed early. If detected in later stages, the survival rate is very low.”In their approach, researchers use transvaginal ultrasound to obtain information about ovarian tumors, but ultrasound lacks accuracy in diagnosis of ovarian masses, Zhu said. Photoacoustic tomography, however, gives researchers a very detailed look at the tumor’s vasculature, or tumor angiogenesis, and blood oxygen saturation (sO2) by lighting up the tumor’s vasculature bed and allowing for more accurate diagnoses of ovarian masses seen by ultrasound.Both tumor angiogenesis and tumor sO2 are related to tumor growth, metabolism and therapeutic response. The Washington University team is the only team using co-registered photoacoustic imaging and ultrasound to diagnose ovarian cancer.In the pilot study, Zhu and her team created a sheath with optical fibers that wrap around a standard transvaginal ultrasound probe. The optical fibers are connected to a laser. Once the probe is inside the patient, Zhu turns the laser on, which shines through the vaginal muscle wall. With photoacoustic tomography, the light from the laser propagates, gets absorbed by the tumor and generates sound waves, revealing information about the tumor angiogenesis and sO2 inside the ultrasound-visible ovaries. A normal ovary contains a lot of collagen, Zhu said, but an ovary with invasive cancers has extensive blood vessels and lower sO2.The team used two biomarkers to characterize the ovaries: relative total hemoglobin concentration (rHbT), which is directly related to tumor angiogenesis, and mean oxygen saturation (sO2). In this pilot study, the team found that the rHbT was 1.9 times higher for invasive epithelial cancerous ovaries, which make up 90 percent of ovarian cancers, than for normal ovaries. The mean oxygen saturation of invasive epithelial cancers was 9.1 percent lower than normal and benign ovaries. All five invasive epithelial cancerous ovaries, including two stage 1 and 2 cancers, showed extensive rHbT distribution and lower sO2.Related StoriesStudy reveals link between inflammatory diet and colorectal cancer riskUsing machine learning algorithm to accurately diagnose breast cancerNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancer”Physicians are very excited about this because it might bring significant change into current clinical practice,” Zhu said. “It is very valuable to detect and diagnose ovarian cancers at early stages. It is also important to provide information and assurance to patients that there is no worry about their ovaries, instead of removing a patient’s ovaries. This technology can also be valuable to monitor high-risk patients who have increased risk of ovarian and breast cancers due to their genetic mutations. The current standard of care for these women is performing risk reduction surgeries to remove their ovaries at some point, which affects their quality of life and causes other health problems.””We are very fortunate to participate in this research endeavor headed by Dr. Zhu,” said Cary Siegel, MD, professor of radiology and chief of gastrointestinal/genitourinary radiology at the School of Medicine. “This photoacoustic imaging study has great potential to better identify ovarian cancers and may play a valuable role in screening high-risk patients and triaging patients for follow-up imaging or surgical excision.”Zhu credits her physician collaborators, including Siegel; Matthew Powell, MD, associate professor and chief of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology; Ian Hagemann, MD, PhD, assistant professor of pathology & immunology; David Mutch, MD, the Ira C. and Judith Gall Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; the radiology team and the entire gynecology group, as well as her doctoral students Sreyankar Nandy, Atahar Mostafa and Eghbal Amidi, who worked on instrumentation, control software and data processing.”I really appreciated this as a group effort to bring the study to this point,” Zhu said. “This technology may provide a means to improve early ovarian cancer detection, help avoid surgery in most patients with a normal or benign ovary, substantially reduce medical costs, and improve women’s quality of life. We look forward to bringing this study to the next level.”These initial results will need to be validated with more patients, Zhu said, and the team is applying for funding to conduct a large clinical trial.Source: https://source.wustl.edu/2018/11/hopeful-technology-could-change-detection-diagnosis-of-deadly-ovarian-cancer/last_img read more

18Jul/19

Free health check up ignored by more than half of the population

first_imgDoctor measuring blood pressure with sphygmomanometer. Image Credit: Kurhan / Shutterstock The free health tests included screening for dementia, heart diseases, kidney ailments and type 2 diabetes. The NHS said that over 15 million people were eligible to take the tests while only a minority took them. Since 2013, only 7.15 million individuals have taken these tests.  Experts have added that the tests would be just 20 minutes long but help detect many conditions and save lives. A GP or a nurse would check the body weight and height and measure the blood pressure as part of the test. Irregular heartbeats, risks for strokes can all be identified with the test. Strokes and risks of vascular dementias could also be assessed say experts.They explain that dementia and Alzheimer’s kills thousands each year in England and Wales. These tests could help diagnose the conditions early. Alistair Burns, national clinical director for dementia at NHS England says, “The start of a new year is exactly the right time to commit to taking a simple, free and potentially life-saving step towards a healthier life.”Related StoriesHealthy lifestyle lowers dementia risk despite genetic predispositionResearch team to create new technology for tackling concussionArtificial intelligence can help accurately predict acute kidney injury in burn patientsThese health check-ups are offered to all individuals aged between 40 and 74 with no pre-existing health conditions. They are provided every five years. Laura Phipps, head of communications at Alzheimer’s Research UK says, “There is good evidence to suggest that what’s good for the heart is also good for the brain, but while 77% people believe they can reduce their risk of heart disease, only 34% of people know they can reduce their risk of dementia… Research shows that midlife is a crucial time to take action that will help maintain a healthy brain into later life. With dementia now the UK’s leading cause of death, we must encourage everyone to take positive steps to maintain good brain health throughout life and into older age.”These five yearly checks are part of the NHS’ effort to diagnose dementia early among the population of England. The organization is trying to ensure that least two thirds of the people with dementia are diagnosed and treated early.The programme at the Public Health England is led by Jamie Waterall who said, “The NHS health check looks at the top causes of premature death and ill health but more importantly supports people to take action of reducing their risk of preventable conditions such as dementia and heart disease.”The test is followed by advice on improving health and lifestyle that includes having a healthy balanced diet, regular exercise, quitting smoking, taking medications to lower blood pressure and cholesterol, losing excess body weight etc. By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJan 1 2019The NHS England provided a free health check up to the population over forty years of age and has noted that more than half of them did not take the health check-ups that could detect and treat dementias and other conditions.last_img read more

18Jul/19

New video gameled training device helps stroke survivors regain arm mobility

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 20 2019Severely impaired stroke survivors are regaining function in their arms after sometimes decades of immobility, thanks to a new video game-led training device invented by Northwestern Medicine scientists.When integrated with a customized video game, the device, called a myoelectric computer interface (MyoCI), helped retrain stroke survivors’ arm muscles into moving more normally. Most of the 32 study participants experienced increased arm mobility and reduced arm stiffness while they were using the training interface. Most participants retained their arm function a month after finishing the training.The study will be published March 19 in the journal Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair.Many stroke survivors can’t extend their arm forward with a straight elbow because the muscles act against each other in abnormal ways, called “abnormal co-activation” or “abnormal coupling.”The Northwestern device identifies which muscles are abnormally coupled and retrains the muscles into moving normally by using their electrical muscle activity (called electromyogram, or EMG) to control a cursor in a customized video game. The more the muscles decouple, the higher the person’s score. (More on how the device works below)”We gamified the therapy into an ’80s-style video game,” said senior author Dr. Marc Slutzky, associate professor of neurology and of physiology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Northwestern Medicine neurologist. “It’s rather basic graphics by today’s standards but it’s entertaining enough.”Slutzky and his co-authors have paired with a company on an early version of a wearable device to study at-home use with patients. The device communicates wirelessly with a laptop or tablet and the goal is to make this a completely wireless, wearable device.”The beauty of this is even if the benefit doesn’t persist for months or years, patients with a wearable device could do a ‘tune-up’ session every couple weeks, months or whenever they need it,” said Slutzky, whose team designed the original device. “Long-term, I envision having flexible, fully wireless electrodes that an occupational therapist could quickly apply in their office, and patients could go home and train by themselves.”Slutzky also is studying this method on stroke patients in the hospital, starting within a week of their stroke.A NEW TYPE OF STROKE THERAPY:Abnormal coupling of muscles leaves many stroke patients with a bent elbow, which makes it difficult to benefit from typical task-based stroke-rehabilitation therapies, such as training on bathing, getting dressed and eating.Only about 30 percent of stroke patients in the United States receive therapy after their initial in-patient rehabilitation stay, often because their injury is too severe to benefit from standard therapy, it costs too much, or they’re too far from a therapist. This small, preliminary study lays the groundwork for inexpensive, wearable, at-home therapy options for severely impaired stroke survivors.”We’re still in the very early stages but I’m hopeful this may be an effective new type of stroke therapy,” Slutzky said. “The goal is to one day let patients buy the training device inexpensively, potentially without even needing insurance and use it wirelessly in their home.”Related StoriesMeasuring blood protein levels in diabetic patients to predict risk of strokeNew discovery may explain some forms of strokeStem cell stimulation shows promise as potential stroke treatmentHOPE FOR SEVERELY IMPAIRED STROKE SURVIVORS:Patients in the study were severely impaired – could only slightly move their arm and extend their elbow- and had had their stroke at least six months prior to beginning the study. The average patient was more than six years out from their stroke and some were decades out.After Slutzky’s intervention, study participants could, on average, extend their elbow angle by 11 degrees more than before the intervention, which was a pleasant surprise, Slutzky said.”Classically, in patients that far out from a stroke, we don’t typically expect to see any improvements, but we saw modest yet significant improvement in these patients,” Slutzky said.This type of treatment only requires a small amount of muscle activation, which is advantageous for severely impaired stroke patients who typically can’t move enough to even begin standard physical therapy. It also gives feedback to the patient if they’re activating their muscles properly.”We learn how to move by trial and error,” Slutzky said. “If you don’t have any feedback about the errors, it’s hard to learn to improve movement. This task provides patients with clear feedback about their muscle activation.”HOW THE DEVICE WORKS:To identify which muscles were abnormally coupled, study participants attempted to reach out to multiple different targets while the scientists recorded the electrical activity in eight of their arm muscles using electrodes attached to the skin. For example, the biceps and anterior deltoid muscles in the arm often activated together in stroke participants, while they normally shouldn’t.Then, to retrain the muscles into moving normally (i.e., without abnormally co-activating), the participants used their electrical muscle activity to control a cursor in a customized video game. The two abnormally coupled muscles moved the cursor in either horizontal or vertical directions, in proportion to their EMG amplitude. For example, if the biceps would contract in isolation, the cursor would move up. If the anterior muscles would contract in isolation, the cursor would move to the side. But if the muscles would contract together, the cursor would move diagonally.The goal was to move the cursor only vertically or horizontally – not diagonally – to acquire targets in the game. To get a high score, participants had to learn to decouple the abnormally coupled muscles.Muscles tend to produce more electrical muscle activity when contracting isometrically (without moving) compared to when moving the arm freely, but the ultimate goal of this training is to enable home use. One goal of this study was to see if participants could benefit without restraining the arm as much as with restraining the arm.Participants were broken into three groups: 60 minutes of training with their arm restrained; 90 minutes of training with their arm restrained; and 90 minutes of training without arm restraints. Overall, arm function improved substantially in all groups and there was no significant difference between the three groups.Source: https://news.northwestern.edu/stories/2019/03/stroke-rehab-game/last_img read more

18Jul/19

Study Involvement of prefrontal cortex areas decreases with aging

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 26 2019Researchers from HSE University and York University have become the first to analyze the results of 82 functional neuroimaging studies on working memory mechanisms in different adult age groups. The meta-analyses showed that across studies the agreement of various areas of the prefrontal cortex decreases with aging, suggesting reorganization of brain function during healthy aging. The results have been published in the paper ‘Meta-analyses of the n-back working memory task: fMRI evidence of age-related changes in prefrontal cortex involvement across the adult lifespan’: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.03.074Working memory is a system that helps keep information readily available as we use it for performing tasks here and now, including complex intellectual operations such as learning, understanding and reasoning. For example, we use this type of memory to detect and remember the most important things in another person’s speech and then give that person a meaningful answer. The resources of working memory are limited, and with age, its size changes.Marie Arsalidou, Zachary Yaple, and Dale Stevens analyzed data on brain activity in 2020 adults, divided into three age groups: young (18-35), middle-aged (35-55), and older adults (55-85). In all the studies, research volunteers played a game called the ‘n-back task’: they were asked to detect and respond whether they had seen the image demonstrated at the moment, ‘n’ positions back. The complexity of the task depends on the value of ‘n’. During an experiment, each study monitored the brain areas that are activated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).Meta-analysis demonstrated that the involvement of prefrontal cortex areas and their coordination during a task showed increased agreement across studies in young people, lower agreement in middle-aged adults, and no significant agreement in older adults. Lack of agreement in older adults suggests increased variability and individual differences in this group. With older age, parietal regions of the cortex are activated more often, which might be a sign of functional re-organization of working memory mechanisms or of these regions’ compensatory function.Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingThe prefrontal cortex plays a key role in complicated intellectual processes, including the coordination of different brain areas that are activated during the use of working memory.’Brain changes throughout adulthood, and it appears to be more dynamic that we initially thought. Because the original studies did not consistently report performance scores, we analyzed brain responses with the assumption that working memory performance was comparable. Therefore, we cannot say from our study that working memory skills decrease with age. What we can say is that variability in prefrontal cortex activity may suggest differences in strategies used to problem solve across adulthood. This gives a good target for future work to decipher direct relations among age, brain function and performance’ believes one of the study’s authors, Marie Arsalidou, Assistant Professor at the HSE School of Psychology.The results of this study are comparable with the conclusions of the previous meta-analysis of working memory mechanisms in children, which was carried out by Marie Arsalidou together with HSE researcher Zachary Yaple: during n-back task performance, not only prefrontal and parietal cortex regions are activated in children, but also other brain areas. Further research in this area will help us understand how working memory mechanisms change during development in humans. Source:https://iq.hse.ru/en/news/266810949.htmllast_img read more

18Jul/19

Intel underfoot Floor sensors rise as retail data source

This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Citation: Intel underfoot: Floor sensors rise as retail data source (2018, January 15) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-intel-underfoot-floor-sensors-retail.html More businesses are trying mobile apps to lure and keep consumers Online clicks give retailers valuable insight into consumer behavior, but what can they learn from footsteps? It’s a question Milwaukee-based startup Scanalytics is helping businesses explore with floor sensors that track people’s movements.The sensors can also be used in office buildings to reduce energy costs and in nursing homes to determine when someone falls. But retailers make up the majority of Scanalytics’ customers, highlighting one of several efforts brick-and-mortar stores are undertaking to better understand consumer habits and catch up with e-commerce giant Amazon.Physical stores have been at a disadvantage because they “don’t have that granular level of understanding as to where users are entering, what they’re doing, what shelves are not doing well, which aisles are not being visited,” said Brian Sathianathan, co-founder of Iterate.ai, a small Denver-based company that helps businesses find and test technologies from startups worldwide.But it’s become easier for stores to track customers in recent years. With Wi-Fi—among the earliest available options—businesses can follow people when they connect to a store’s internet. One drawback is that not everyone logs on so the sample size is smaller. Another is that it’s not possible to tell whether someone is inches or feet away from a product.Sunglass Hut and fragrance maker Jo Malone use laser and motion sensors to tell when a product is picked up but not bought, and make recommendations for similar items on an interactive display. Companies such as Toronto-based Vendlytics and San Francisco-based Prism use artificial intelligence with video cameras to analyze body motions. That can allow stores to deliver customized coupons to shoppers in real time on a digital shelf or on their cellphones, said Jon Nordmark, CEO of Iterate.ai.With Scanalytics, Nordmark said, “to have (the sensors) be super useful for someone like a retailer, they may need to power other types of things,” like sending coupons to customers.Scanalytics co-founder and CEO Joe Scanlin said that’s what his floor sensors are designed to do. For instance, the sensors read a customer’s unique foot compressions to track that person’s path to a digital display and how long the person stand in front of it before walking away, he said. Based on data collected over time, the floor sensors can tell a retailer the best time to offer a coupon or change the display before the customer loses interest. The next phase in data collection is right under your feet. In this photo taken Dec. 5, 2017, Scanalytics co-founder and CEO Joe Scanlin holds a smart floor sensor his company creates that track people’s movements in Milwaukee. The sensors are among the tools retailers are using to gain insights on consumer habits. (AP Photo/Ivan Moreno) Explore further “Something that in the moment will increase their propensity to purchase a product,” said Scanlin, 29, who started developing the paper-thin sensors that are 2-square feet (0.19-sq. meters) as a student at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater in 2012. He employs about 20 people.Wisconsin-based bicycle retailer Wheel and Sprocket uses Scanalytics’ sensors—which can be tucked under utility mats—to count the number of customers entering each of its eight stores to help schedule staff. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In this photo taken Dec. 5, 2017, Scanalytics co-founder and CEO Joe Scanlin holds a smart floor sensor his company creates that track people’s movements in Milwaukee. The sensors are among the tools retailers are using to gain insights on consumer habits. (AP Photo/Ivan Moreno) “That’s our biggest variable expense,” said co-owner Noel Kegel. “That sort of makes or breaks our profitability.”Kegel wants to eventually have sensors in more areas throughout his stores to measure where customers spend most of their time and what products are popular, but he said it’s too expensive right now.The cost of having the sensors ranges from $20 to $1,000 per month, depending on square footage and add-on applications to analyze data or interact with digital signs, Scanlin said. He said he’s working with 150 customers in the U.S. and other countries and estimates that about 60 percent are retailers.The emergence of tracking technologies is bound to raise concerns about privacy and surveillance. But Scanlin noted his sensors don’t collect personally identifying information.Jeffrey Lenon, 47, who was recently shopping at the Shops of Grand Avenue mall in Milwaukee, said he wasn’t bothered by the idea of stores tracking foot traffic and buying habits.”If that’s helping the retailer as far as tracking what sells and what no, I think it’s a good idea,” Lenon said.These technologies have not become ubiquitous in the U.S. yet, but it’s only a matter of time, said Ghose Anindya, a business professor at New York University’s Stern School of Business.”In a couple of years this kind of conversation will be like part and parcel of everyday life. But I don’t think we’re there yet,” he said.——A sampling of tracking technologies for traditional storesBrick-and-mortar retailers are using different tracking technologies to better understand their customers and keep up with e-commerce giant Amazon. Here is a sampling of the different tracking methods available to stores:FLOOR SENSORSPaper-thin tiles developed by Milwaukee-based Scanalytics measure foot compressions to analyze people’s movements over time so stores know what products displays draw customers’ attention and for how long. That allows businesses to study what sells, know when to schedule staff for busy times, and what store layout is most effective. The technology might still be too pricey for smaller retailers, however.INTELLIGENT VIDEO CAMERASCompanies such as Toronto-based Vendlytics and San Francisco-based Prism use artificial intelligence with video cameras to analyze body motions. That can allow stores to deliver customized coupons to shoppers in real-time on a digital shelf or on their cellphones on an app.MOTION SENSORSSunglass Hut and fragrance maker Jo Malone are using laser and motion sensors from Perch Interactive to tell when a product is picked up but not bought. The technology can also make recommendations for similar items on an interactive display.WI-FI BEACONSWi-Fi beacons can track customer movements—as long as they connect to the store’s internet. Because not everyone opts in, stores have a smaller sample size to analyze. Another drawback is that it’s not possible to tell whether a customer is inches or feet from a product. read more

18Jul/19

Uncovering the secrets of the human bodys perception of touch

More information: Masashi Nakatani et al. TECHTILE Workshop for Creating Haptic Content, Pervasive Haptics (2016). DOI: 10.1007/978-4-431-55772-2_12 Masashi Nakatani et al. Softness sensor system for simultaneously measuring the mechanical properties of superficial skin layer and whole skin, Skin Research and Technology (2012). DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0846.2012.00648.x Srdjan Maksimovic et al. Epidermal Merkel cells are mechanosensory cells that tune mammalian touch receptors, Nature (2014). DOI: 10.1038/nature13250 Journal information: Nature Nakatani and colleagues invented the TECHTILE toolkit to promote people to appreciate the sense of touch. “I think that modern haptic devices must provide greater value for us to enjoy our daily lives,” says Nakatani. One of Nakatani’s students, Kazuki Sakurada, has developed a smartphone-based haptic chat system with audio-vibrotactile feedback to provide a sense of presence of others during text conversations. “This study may yield clues about the importance of somatic feedback in emotional attachment with other people (Fig. 2),” says Nakatani. “In the long term, I would like to enhance human abilities to extract valuable knowledge from overwhelming, excessive information in the environment.” Now, Nakatani is concentrating on developmental psychology in infants, a topic that was triggered by a chance meeting with an educator developing parenting classes for children from 0 to 6 years old, who wanted to use state-of-the-art media technology that included haptics. “This sounded like a very cool concept and I decided to collaborate to develop a parenting service for children,” explains Nakatani. “I’m studying how infants explore and ‘feel their world’ using their vision and touch before they have even acquired language skills. They are collecting information needed to survive.” Underscoring concerns about the effects of modern technology on children’s behavior, Nakatani is analyzing how current technologies such as smartphones and tablet PCs affect their visual and haptic exploratory behavior. “My working hypothesis is that some kids have less opportunities to explore with touch modality because of exposure to massive amounts of information and communications via visual modality, so that they explore environments less manually and actively,” explains Nakatani. The Keio SFC campus is also conducive for interdisciplinary research, an important factor for Nakatani to be able to pursue his studies on haptics and other research field. “I am working with a music-neuroscientist, Dr. Shinya Fujii, on the relationship between auditory and haptic feedback on subjective frisson, that is the ‘feeling of being chilled and touched’,” says Nakatani. “One of my goals is to clarify how body perception helps us acquire cognitive skills that are unique to human beings, particularly in the modern information age” (Fig.1). Provided by Keio University Scientific research has yielded deep understanding on the human senses of sight, hearing, smell, and taste. But knowledge about bodily perceptions of the sense of touch is still limited. For example, during a handshake, who is shaking whose hand? The answer to this question is just one of the multifaceted aspects of touch being studied by ‘haptics scientist’ Masashi Nakatani. “I am intrigued by human somatosensory (touch and body) perception and its utilization for positive psychological and cognitive effects in our daily lives,” says Nakatani, who commenced his research on the Shonan Fujisawa Campus (SFC), Keio University, in April 2017. “I started studying touch modality 16 years ago as an undergraduate. My doctorate was about human tactile perception for developing tactile displays that can provide information through the skin surface.” After his doctorate, Nakatani investigated touch receptors embedded in the skin in a dermatology laboratory and also worked in industry on developing tactile sensors for evaluating cosmetics. Controlling core switching in Pac-man disks Explore further Figure 2: Smartphone-based haptic text-based chat system with audio-vibrotactile feedback for sense of presence. Credit: Kazuki Sakurada, SFC TOUCH LAB Figure 1: Children from 0 to 6 years old explore their environments to collect information necessary for their survival. Credit: ISETAN SHINJUKU Citation: Uncovering the secrets of the human body’s perception of touch (2018, March 8) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-03-uncovering-secrets-human-body-perception.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

18Jul/19

Sensors in public spaces can help create cities that are both smart

Overflowing bins are one way to spoil the amenity of public space, but sensors can now alert councils when bins need emptying. Credit: Wikimedia How are smart cities meant to meet citizen needs? Big data from a network of sensors can give managers and planners a real-time, big-picture overview of traffic flows, public transport patronage, and water and power use. However, the needs of people in the city must be met at both the meta and micro levels. To do this we need site-specific and real-time information on how people use and value public spaces. Smart technology can collect this information from public spaces. This involves asking questions such as who is using it, how, why and for how long?We are investigating these questions in collaboration with Street Furniture Australia and Georges River Council in New South Wales, with funding from the Commonwealth Smart Cities and Suburbs Program. As cities densify and apartment living becomes the norm, public outdoor spaces will be increasingly important for everyday socialisation, as well as special gatherings and celebrations. Planners and urban designers need to develop their understanding of exactly how these valuable public spaces work to maximise their social and functional amenity. What is the project about?The team will record the detailed use of two public spaces. At first, behaviour mapping will provide detailed observational information about what’s happening in both spaces. The team will then embed invisible digital sensors in and on street furniture. This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. The idea of smart public space is to maximise the public uses and benefits. Georges River Council is looking at ‘healthy living hardware’ that, for example, improves outdoor cooking facilities by including preparation areas and wash stations. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In another example, a seat or bench that is hardly being used could be broken or too exposed to weather, and so should be moved. Any lack of use by children or older people could indicate that the location is not child-friendly or not easily accessible, for example. Again, relocation might be considered.But what about the users of these spaces?Smart technology can help to transform the traditional user experience and enhance the capacity of public open space to support 21st-century city living. Think, for instance, of additions such as Wi-Fi or plugin points for laptops and phones.Cities around the world are exploring how technology can improve the management of public spaces and facilities and better connect residents with local facilities and events. In Tel Aviv, for example, residents are issued with the Digi Tel Card. The card gives live updates about:rates and discounts available at sport and recreation facilitieswhat is happening in the citypersonalised information based, for example, on cultural or music preferencesinformation about issues, such as roadworks or community events, that may disrupt streets. Tel Aviv’s DigiTel card connects residents to a personalised, interest-and-location-based digital communication network. Isn’t this technology rather intrusive?While the benefits are many, greater use of technology in parks and the public domain raises questions. Traditionally, urban parks and open spaces have been places where people go to “unwind”, so installing technological devices there may be seen as invasive. Some people may also feel uncomfortable about governments (albeit local ones) gaining data about them in a place where they want to relax. Additional questions relate to privacy, data ownership and how we can protect the technology from vandalism.As for concerns about surveillance, the world has changed and the public space realm has changed with it. Walk through any major Australian city CBD and you will be filmed on CCTV. Various smart card ticketing systems (Opal in NSW, myki in Victoria and go card in Queensland) provide a detailed record of everyone’s movements on public transport. Automatic numberplate scanners on tollways and in police cars are recording where we drive. Even in parks, devices such as mobile phones track our location. By comparison, the sensors on street furniture will be relatively non-invasive and will not identify individual people.The impetus for this research and data-gathering is to assist local government decision-making. By identifying and collecting relevant data, councils will have much-needed evidence to improve people’s lives as they use different public spaces. New scenarios can be identified, offering alternatives to provide support for different urban activities. It is hard to predict just how much will need to alter as our cities densify and we increasingly rely on public spaces to meet many of our social needs. By ensuring all the elements of the public realm are efficiently and appropriately serving residents’ needs, planning and design policies and practices will be able to shape 21st-century cities that are both smart and sociable. Citation: Sensors in public spaces can help create cities that are both smart and sociable (2018, April 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-04-sensors-spaces-cities-smart-sociable.html Explore further Provided by The Conversation Many people feel lonely in the city, but perhaps ‘third places’ can help with that In response to simple design changes, such as seating, the number of people visiting and staying in the space grew. So too did the diversity of visitors, with families and children coming into the space. This extra activity benefited nearby shops.So what can smart technology achieve?One example of smart furniture is smart bins. Street Furniture Australia already has a product with sensors that tell council maintenance crews how full the bin is and whether it needs to be emptied. This information could yield insights about how these bins are being used and when. We will target picnic tables, rubbish bins, barbecues, seats, cigarette ash receptacles, bubblers, power points and lights. The sensors will measure usage, including water and power consumption. They will also provide real-time messages to the council on whether, for example, an ash receptacle is overheating, or a street bollard is damaged.Information like this can be used to improve the amenity and user experience of public open spaces, as well as help to manage these spaces more efficiently. Our public spaces can be great social spaces, or merely places for through traffic. An experiment in Canberra’s Garema Place by Street Furniture Australia shows how such a thoroughfare can be turned around. read more

18Jul/19

Tree Man Gets Pioneering Surgery for Rare Skin Condition

first_img 10 Medical Conditions That Sound Fake but Are Actually Real 27 Oddest Medical Case Reports A man in Gaza with an extremely rare skin condition dubbed “tree man syndrome” says his life has been changed by a pioneering surgical treatment, according to news reports. The man, 44-year-old Mahmoud Taluli, has undergone four surgeries in the last two years to remove extensive, wood-like lesions on his hands, according to NPR. Prior to the surgeries, Taluli hadn’t been able to use his hands for more than a decade. “After years of suffering and solitude, I can finally live a normal life,” Taluli told NPR. “I can play with my children. I can go to family events. I no longer need to cover my hands when I go out in public.”Headbutting Tiny Worms Are Really, Really LoudThis rapid strike produces a loud ‘pop’ comparable to those made by snapping shrimps, one of the most intense biological sounds measured at sea.Your Recommended PlaylistVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9接下来播放Why Is It ‘Snowing’ Salt in the Dead Sea?01:53 facebook twitter 发邮件 reddit 链接https://www.livescience.com/65907-tree-man-gaza-surgery.html?jwsource=cl已复制直播00:0000:3500:35  Taluli has a rare genetic condition called epidermodysplasia verruciformis, which makes him much more susceptible to skin infections caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), compared with the average person, according to a 2010 report of the condition published in the journal Disease Markers. People with this condition have immune system problems that prevent them from properly fighting off HPVs — a group of more than 150 related viruses. In healthy people, HPVs often don’t cause symptoms, but in people with epidermodysplasia verruciformis, the infections lead to the formation of wart-like skin lesions, which progress to malignant tumors in about 50% of patients, according to the 2010 report. There is no cure or standard treatment for the condition. Taluli’s treatment has involved doctors making deep incisions into the skin to remove thousands of lesions, NPR reported. This tissue removal often requires skin grafts from other parts of his body to help with healing. The treatment has allowed Taluli to use his hands again, but it is not a cure — new growths continue to show up, and Taluli will need a fifth operation this summer to remove these new lesions, as well as some scar tissue, NPR reported. Still, the treatment has been largely successful in improving Taluli’s hand function. “We didn’t know if there would be anything viable left of his hands, but thank God it’s working,” Dr. Michael Chernofsky, a hand and microvascular surgeon at Hadassah Medical Center in Jerusalem, who treated Taluli, told NPR. Ultimately, doctors hope to develop a treatment that can help Taluli’s immune system better fight HPV, NPR reported. Another man with epidermodysplasia verruciformis hasn’t fared as well. Last month, it was reported that Abul Bajandar of Bangladesh had asked doctors to amputate his hands due to pain from the condition, according to Fox News. Although Bajandar has had more than 20 surgeries to remove skin lesions, the growths appear to be coming back worse than before. Chernofsky told NPR that amputation is usually not a good idea, because the patient would likely still experience pain from severed nerves. Originally published on Live Science.by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeVikings: Free Online GamePlay this for 1 min and see why everyone is addicted!Vikings: Free Online GameUndoTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionOne Thing All Liars Have in Common, Brace YourselfTruthFinder People Search SubscriptionUndoBeverly Hills MDPlastic Surgeon Reveals: “You Can Fill In Wrinkles At Home” (Here’s How)Beverly Hills MDUndoGundry MD Total Restore SupplementU.S. Cardiologist: It’s Like a Pressure Wash for Your InsidesGundry MD Total Restore SupplementUndoArticles VallyDad Cuts Daughter’s Hair Off For Getting Birthday Highlights, Then Mom Does The UnthinkableArticles VallyUndoKelley Blue Book2019 Lexus Vehicles Worth Buying for Their Resale ValueKelley Blue BookUndo 10 Strangest Medical Cases of 2018last_img read more