Vermont Country Store survey reveals most popular classic candy and toys

first_imgVermont Country Store,A new survey conducted recently by Harris Interactive for The Vermont Country Store shows what classic toys and candy people remember most when they were young. Of the 2,104 adults age 18 or older who were surveyed online, more than a third (39%) responded that chocolate bars were their top candy choice when they were a child. Also, more than a quarter of the respondents (29%) noted that a doll or stuffed animal was their favorite childhood toy.‘In the current era of electronics and always wanting ‘the next best thing,’ it’s nice to travel back in time and remember when life was simpler and products were more memorable,’ said Cabot Orton, proprietor of The Vermont Country Store. ‘Toys and candy especially are the iconic childhood products that many people recall easily as adults. This survey gives us great insight into those products that make people feel nostalgic and reminiscent of their youth.’Some of the other favorite candies noted in The Vermont Country Store survey were lollipops or hard candy (10%), licorice (8%), and jelly beans (8%). Other top choices for toys were trains (9%) and building blocks (8%).The Vermont Country Store’s catalogue, website (www.vermontcountrystore.com(link is external)) and retail locations (Weston and Rockingham, VT) are home to thousands of classic toys, candy and other products that transport customers back in time.About The Vermont Country StoreIn 1946, Vrest and Ellen Orton printed their first catalog’just 12 pages and 36 products’and mailed it to the folks on their Christmas card list. Sixty years later and promoting itself as Purveyors of The Practical and Hard to Find, The Vermont Country Store has become ‘Nostalgia Central’ and continues its catalog business, manages a thriving e-commerce Web site and operates two retail stores in Weston and Rockingham, Vermont. For more information, please visit www.vermontcountrystore.com(link is external).About the SurveyThis survey was conducted online within the United States by Harris Interactive on behalf of The Vermont Country Store from November 18-22, 2010 among 2,104 adults ages 18 and older. This online survey is not based on a probability sample and therefore no estimate of theoretical sampling error can be calculated. For complete survey methodology, including weighting variables, please contact Lauren Howe at (401)-553-5106 or lhowe@rdwgroup.com(link sends e-mail). Source: Vermont Country Store. MANCHESTER CENTER, Vt.–(BUSINESS WIRE)– 12.8.2010last_img read more

Legislators say statutes must ensure merchants protect consumers’ info

first_img 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A stable law to ensure merchants are appropriately protecting consumers is needed, said Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-Fla.) in a subcommittee hearing Tuesday on elements of potential data breach legislation.The House subcommittee on commerce, manufacturing and trade discussed the specifics of such legislation and heard from a panel of experts on the matter.Tuesday’s hearing is likely to be the first in a series of hearings on creating data breach legislation, and it saw many of the themes that are likely to emerge when creating such a bill.The members of the subcommittee all agreed at the outset of the hearing that data breach legislation that is universal and includes standards for consumer notification is needed. There are currently 47 different state laws dealing with data breach notification and 12 state laws governing commercial data security.The subcommittee chair, Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.), said Congress has a real opportunity to set a single national data security standard, which is a key component to combating the effects of data breaches. Rep. Frank Pallone (D-N.J.) said that he would not support any bill that supersedes strong state protections with a “weak federal standard.” continue reading »last_img read more