Classes suspended as bomb threat hits UG

first_imgBy Shemuel FanfairOn the heels of security threats at three top high schools, the country’s premier tertiary institution, the University of Guyana has become the latest target of bomb threats with tense moments unfolding at the Turkeyen Campus on Tuesday when students and staff fled to the sports field in a bid to preserve their safety.The suspected terror threat, which is believed to be domestic in its nature, forced the suspension of all classes with Police ranks, sniffer dogs, Guyana Fire Service operatives and other security operatives swopping down on the campus.Guyana Times understands that students received messages on their mobileA desolate University Campus on Tuesday afternoondevices just after 13:00h which purported that there were two bombs planted and which would soon explode. The bombs, the text claimed, were hidden in haversacks that were strategically placed, which caused some to panic and flee classrooms and buildings with some even leaving belongings behind. After security agents were summoned to the scene, no explosive device was uncovered up to the time this publication visited the area as the authorities continue investigations into the anonymous text message. Guyana Times met briefly with the University’s Vice-Chancellor Professor Ivelaw Griffith, who explained that a building-by-building assessment was being conducted to determine the safety of the staff and students. He said this was geared to ensure that classes would return to normal today as he sought to assure students that the institution will be a safe place. “The experience at other institutions in recent time has allowed people to appreciate where uncertainty of this kind is part of the reality; we are doing everything that is humanly possible to ensure the safety and security of the buildings and it would be wonderful for us all to return to work and study tomorrow (Wednesday),” the University’s principal told this publication.He went on to explain that there will be a general review of the protocol procedures that govern the institution. Griffith added that they did not want to take for granted that the threat was not credible.Just after 14:00h, the Campus became a silent zone which was unlike its usual atmosphere where students can be seen traversing the roads and buildings engaging in debates, intense conversations, laughter or hurrying to attend classes. It was a scene of worry for some who told Guyana Times they will await official word from senior academic staff before they can comment on the situation. Nevertheless, others took it with less fear, saying they did not panic when they were led to assemble on the field.This latest incident follows threats carried out to School of the Nations, Queens College and the Bishops’ High. The threats were given added attention after Nations’ Director, Dr Brian O’Toole was shot at his home; the Briton is now recovering. This led to the private institution halting operations for several days.Meanwhile, Police ranks were placed at Queen’s College and other city schools. However, as this newspaper reported, only 100 out of some 700 students turned up for classes on Monday as parents became hesitant in allowing their children to attend school. Parents at QC had not been allowed to enter the premises but were asked to wait outside until classes were dismissed.last_img read more

Prosecutor lays out Christmas Eve attack that killed 6 family members

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECoach Doc Rivers a “fan” from way back of Jazz’s Jordan Clarkson“In the end, what motive could you find that would make sense of the senseless slaying of the Anderson family?” Satterberg said. Satterberg’s account of the crime and a police affidavit portray a Christmas Eve that exploded in gunfire and bloodshed, leaving three generations of a family dead. “In the span of one hour, the defendants had turned this family’s Christmas Eve celebration into a scene of mass murder,” Satterberg said as he charged Anderson and McEnroe with the only crime punishable by death in Washington. Satterberg has 30 days to decide whether to seek the death penalty. According to court documents, after killing her parents, Anderson and McEnroe, both 29, dragged the bodies to a shed outside the rural Carnation home and mopped up the blood with towels and carpets, according to court documents. They burned some of the evidence in a backyard fire pit, reloaded their weapons and waited for Michele’s brother and his family to arrive. When Scott Anderson, 32, walked in the door, he spotted his sister with a gun and charged her. Michele Anderson and McEnroe shot him multiple times. Michele then shot her sister-in-law, Erica, 32, who still managed to climb over a couch and call 911. An operator at the 911 calling center picked up the call but Erica did not speak before McEnroe tore the phone from her hands and destroyed it. Huddling with her children, Erica Anderson pleaded with McEnroe not to shoot her, saying: “You don’t have to do this.” McEnroe told her: “Yes, we do,”‘ and shot her in the head, according to the affidavit. He then shot 6-year-old Olivia before turning to 3-year-old Nathan, who had picked up the batteries from the cordless phone his mother had used in her futile attempt to call for help. “McEnroe told detectives that Nathan held the batteries up in one hand and gave `… the look of complete comprehension … as if he understood.” McEnroe then fired on last bullet through Nathan’s head, according to the affidavit. When asked why he shot Erica, Olivia and Nathan, McEnroe told detectives three times: “I didn’t want them to turn us in,” according to the affidavit. Michele Anderson told investigators “it was a combination of not wanting them to have to live with the memories and not wanting there to be any witnesses.” Michele Anderson told detectives her brother, a carpenter, owed her money she had loaned to him years earlier, and that she was upset with her parents because they did not take her side. “Michele stated that she was tired of everybody stepping on her,” the court papers say. “She stated that she was upset with her parents and her brother and that if the problems did not get resolved on Dec. 24, then her intent was definitely to kill everybody.” After the killings, McEnroe and Anderson first drove north toward Canada, then south toward Oregon arriving at neither destination, then decided to go back and pretend to discover the bodies, Satterberg said. When they arrived Wednesday, investigators were already there. Detectives, curious that neither McEnroe nor Michele Anderson asked what had happened at the bustling crime scene, began questioning them and they eventually confessed, according to the documents. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SEATTLE – Judy Anderson was wrapping presents for her family on Christmas Eve when gunfire erupted in her living room and her own daughter began a bloodbath that left Anderson and five other members of her family dead, prosecutors said. Anderson ran into the room and saw her daughter’s boyfriend shoot her husband of 38 years, Wayne, prosecutors alleged as they filed aggravated first-degree murder charges Friday. Judy Anderson started screaming and Joe McEnroe turned his gun on her. She fell to the floor, not yet dead. McEnroe apologized and shot her again, this time in the head, according to a police affidavit. King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg said long-standing bitterness and a perceived family debt might have been factors in the shootings, but said he was at a loss to assign a motive to the crime that police say McEnroe and Michele Anderson have admited committing. last_img