Tag Archives: 苏州桑拿

17Oct/19

Spin yarn unspun Research upends theory that Vikings taught Inuit fibre skills

first_imgNew research is upending old assumptions about what the ancestors of today’s Inuit learned from Viking settlers.And the techniques researchers have developed to show that ancient Dorset and Thule people knew how to spin yarn centuries before the Norse were thought to have taught them could change the way archeologists think about Arctic history.“There’s a lot we don’t know,” said Michele Hayeur Smith of Brown University in Rhode Island and lead author of a recent paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science.Hayeur Smith and her colleagues were looking at scraps of yarn, perhaps used to hang amulets or decorate clothing, from ancient sites on Baffin Island and the Ungava Peninsula.The origin of the yarn spun from animal hair and sinew had bedevilled Arctic scientists for generations. Most assumed it was a skill picked up from Viking colonists who sailed west from Greenland, establishing a community at L’Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland about 1,000 years ago.Hayeur Smith, who specializes in the study of ancient textiles, had her doubts.First, the yarn didn’t look like anything she’d seen in years of examining Norse fibres. Second, why would the people of the Arctic — highly skilled clothes-makers — need to learn such a basic technique from anyone else?“The idea that you would have to learn to spin something from another culture was a bit ludicrous,” she said. “It’s a pretty intuitive thing to do.”The problem was the yarn was hard to date. The pieces were full of oil from whales and seals, and anything impregnated with oil from sea mammals has been almost impossible to carbon date.Until now.Co-author Gorill Nilsen at Tromso University in Norway came up with a way to “shampoo” the oil out of the fibres without damaging them. Some fibres from a site on Baffin’s southern coast were then subjected to the latest carbon-dating methods.The results were jaw-dropping, said co-author Kevin Smith of Brown University.“They clustered into a period from about 100 AD to about 600-800 AD — roughly 1,000 years to 500 years before the Vikings ever showed up. (The Dorset) are manipulating the kinds of fibres you find in your environment at least as early as 100 BC.”In fact, the Vikings may have picked up a few tricks from the Thule. It’s not conclusive, but Hayeur Smith said there’s some evidence to suggest Norse weavers learned how to use hair from bears and foxes, as well as from sheep and goats, from the people they referred to as Skraelings.The shampoo technique pioneered on yarn may have huge implications for all Arctic archaeology. Sea mammal oil was everywhere in ancient campsites, which reduces the reliability of standard dating methods. And dating is everything in archeology.“There’s a lot of questions like that in the Arctic — getting the subtleties of when people moved in to certain areas,” Smith said. “How did they move? What are the migration patterns?” she said“Until we get good dating methods we can’t even begin to deal with that.”The study also underlines the importance of studying textiles, in addition to the traditional focus on stone tools and hunting, said Hayeur Smith.“People don’t spend a lot time thinking about this as a valid form of material culture that is representing something else,” she said.“Covering yourself, protecting yourself, is equally as important as eating.”— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960last_img read more

02Sep/19

Rick Perry Sworn In As Energy Secretary

first_imgAndrew Harnik/APEnergy Secretary Rick Perry was sworn in Thursday, apparently having come to terms with heading the agency he once wanted to abolish.Former Texas Gov. Rick Perry is now the 14th U.S. Secretary of Energy, despite having once pledged to eliminate the Department of Energy.Or at least, he tried to pledge to eliminate the department — including once when he couldn’t think of its name.Perry was confirmed Thursday by the Senate in a 62-37 vote.During his confirmation hearing, Perry said, “My past statements made over five years ago about abolishing the Department of Energy do not reflect my current thinking.”That was not the only thing that Perry appeared to have changed his mind about. As NPR’s Jeff Brady has reported, “At various times, Perry has questioned the role of human activity in climate change. At one campaign event, he accused scientists of manipulating data to continue gaining funding on research.”During his confirmation hearing, though, he said he believed that both natural and man-made activity were contributing to climate change.That hasn’t reassured environmental group 350.org. Executive Director May Boeve said in a statement: “Trump just added one more unqualified fossil fuel shill and climate-denier to his cabinet. As governor, Perry doled out millions to oil corporations while silencing the science that tells us our future depends on keeping fossil fuels in the ground.”Other statements Thursday night were supportive though. The American Wind Energy Association praised Perry’s “leadership on wind energy infrastructure” as governor of Texas.There was plenty of “color,” according to the press pool at the swearing in ceremony. Vice President Pence noted that it was an important day for Texas, “the country,” being Texas Independence Day.Perry mentioned the new Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s arrival at work Thursday on horseback, and joked that Perry would be commuting Friday on a “single-stage rocket… what could go wrong.” Perhaps doubting that the press pool would have a sense of humor, he added that he would, in fact, just “quietly drive over and go to work.”Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Sharelast_img read more

17Aug/19

Hilton launches mobile room selection

first_imgHilton Worldwide has announced that its digital check-in and room selection technology is now live across the world and this includes the 20 hotels it operates in the Australasia region.The announcement is the first launch of this technology by Hilton Worldwide in Asia Pacific, and will be followed by a rapid rollout in the next few months, across hotels in Southeast Asia, India, China, and Japan.Through the Hilton HHonors accounts, guests will be able to check-in and choose their exact room from digital floor plans or lists, on desktop, tablet, and mobile devices.Hilton Worldwide global head of digital Geraldine Calpin, said digital check-in and room selection rewards HHonors members for loyalty and puts guests in the driving seat.“Never before have guests been able to check-in, select their rooms from a digital floor plan, and customise their rooms to be ready for arrival. We are truly revolutionising the industry, and this is just the tip of the iceberg for digital at Hilton Worldwide,” Ms Calpin said.This latest announcement forms part of a wider digital strategy for Hilton Worldwide as the company aims to enrich the travel experiences for guests of all backgrounds, visiting all corners of the world.The HHonors loyalty-program offers more than 44 million members more ways to earn and redeem points, enabling them to create experiences worth sharing at more than 4,300 hotels in 94 countries and territories.Source = ETB Travel News: Lewis Wisemanlast_img read more

03Aug/19

Dr Brenda Fitzgerald director of the Centers for

first_imgDr. Brenda Fitzgerald, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, resigned Wednesday following reports that she bought shares in a tobacco company, among other financial dealings that presented a conflict of interest.”Dr. Fitzgerald owns certain complex financial interests that have imposed a broad recusal limiting her ability to complete all of her duties as the CDC Director,” according to a statement issued by Matt Lloyd, a spokesman for the Department of Health and Human Services. “Due to the nature of these financial interests, Dr. Fitzgerald could not divest from them in a definitive time period.”A report in Politico published Tuesday revealed documents showing several new investments, including in a tobacco company, that Fitzgerald made after she took over the agency’s top job. The CDC is a lead federal agency in preventing smoking and tobacco-related diseases.Fitzgerald had come under fire on Capitol Hill for not divesting financial interests in other companies that present potential conflicts of interest, including drugmaker Merck, health insurer Humana and US Food Holding Co.The Politico report, relying on documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act, shows that one day after Fitzgerald purchased stock in Japan Tobacco, she toured the CDC’s Tobacco Laboratory, which studies tobacco’s toxic effects. She sold the tobacco shares on Oct. 26 and all of her stock holdings above $1,000 by Nov. 21, well into her term as CDC director.Fitzgerald previous served as the commissioner of the Georgia Division of Public Health. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.last_img read more

02Aug/19

Should Boston Bring Back Rent Control Poll Close

first_imgShould Boston Bring Back Rent Control? (Poll Closed) No, it will hurt small landlords.  53.48%  (100 votes)     Yes, it will help with the Boston housing crisis.  36.36%  (68 votes)     Maybe, I’m not sure.  10.16%  (19 votes)       Total Votes: 187   Should Boston Bring Back Rent Control? Garrison supports rent control, saying residents are being evicted at high rates and landlords need to be held accountable. She said low-income families are often forced to rent at extreme high costs. What do you think? Should Boston bring back rent control? Vote in our poll and add your comments in the section below. Other councilors spoke out against rent control, saying it hurts small landlords who rent their units out for under market price value and can’t afford to make improvements to the property like new paint or windows.*Advertisement*center_img Web polls are unscientific and reflect only those who choose to participate. NorthEndWaterfront.com polls do not have any official significance and are only intended for the interest of our readers. At a recent Boston City Council meeting, Councilor-at-large Althea Garrison requested a hearing on rent control as a way to combat the housing crisis in Boston.last_img read more

26Jul/19

Facebook Snaps Up FaceSwapping App Creator Masquerade

first_img Brought to you by Reuters Facebook Snaps Up Face-Swapping App Creator Masquerade Facebook Inc. is acquiring Masquerade Technologies Inc., creator of the popular face-swapping app MSQRD, as part of efforts by the world’s largest social network operator to build its video services.Wednesday’s deal comes nearly three years after the Wall Street Journal reported that photo and video messaging app Snapchat had rejected an offer from Facebook.Masquerade, which announced the deal on its website, did not disclose financial details.The deal is more a piece of Facebook’s bigger effort to innovate into video, Monness, Crespi, Hardt, & Co. Inc. analyst James Cakmak said.It is unlikely that Facebook would use Masquerade to significantly draw away Snapchat users, he said.While Snapchat has features such as bulging eyes, Masquerade allows users to add special effects including animal masks and snow to their photos and video.Masquerade, backed by Yuri Gurski and Gagarin Capital, said founders Eugene Nevgen, Sergey Gonchar and Eugene Zatepyakin will join Facebook.The app will continue as a standalone product, Masquerade said.(Reporting by Yashaswini Swamynathan in Bengaluru; Editing by Sriraj Kalluvila)  Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. 2 min read Image credit: Kim Lachance Shandrow | Instagram Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand March 10, 2016center_img Add to Queue Reuters Next Article –shares Facebook Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

19Jul/19

Measles can be deadly for people with weakened immune systems

first_img Source:http://www.idsociety.org/ Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Nov 1 2018Last year, a 26-year-old man receiving treatment for leukemia went to a Swiss hospital’s emergency room with a fever, a sore throat, and a cough, and was admitted. His condition worsened, and 17 days later, he died from severe complications of measles. The man’s weakened immune system was unable to fight off the disease, even though he was vaccinated against measles as a child.A new report in Open Forum Infectious Diseases describes the man’s case, highlighting the importance of maintaining high vaccination coverage in the community to help protect people with compromised immune systems from measles and other vaccine-preventable infections. “Measles is not harmless, it’s a serious disease,” said the report’s lead author, Philipp Jent, MD, of Bern University Hospital and the University of Bern in Switzerland. “There is a responsibility to vaccinate yourself to protect others, not only to protect yourself.”Following the patient’s admission in February of 2017, he developed additional symptoms over the next several days, including a progressive rash, mouth sores, and conjunctivitis, that suggested measles, although he had been fully vaccinated against the disease with the recommended two doses of the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine in the 1990s. A throat swab test confirmed the measles infection. Treatment with ribavirin (an antiviral drug), immunoglobulins (a type of antibody), and vitamin A did not improve his condition. He subsequently developed severe pneumonia and died.The case illustrates how serious measles can be, particularly for people with compromised immune systems due to cancer treatment or other causes. It also underscores the importance of herd immunity in protecting these vulnerable individuals, the report’s authors noted. When vaccination rates in a community are high enough, vaccine-preventable diseases like measles are less likely to spread, which helps protect those who cannot be vaccinated (such as newborns not old enough to be immunized) or, like the patient in this case, for whom vaccines are not as effective.Related StoriesMeasles vaccination associated with health, schooling benefits among childrenVaccination helps protect the public from measlesMeasles vaccination for all to prevent future disease outbreaksWhen the proportion of people in a community who are vaccinated drops below this threshold, however, as it has for measles immunizations in several European countries, outbreaks are more likely. More than 41,000 children and adults in Europe were infected with measles during the first half of 2018, according to the World Health Organization, exceeding the annual total of European cases reported in any previous year this decade. In the U.S., there had been 142 confirmed cases of measles in 2018 as of early October, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Data released by CDC in October also showed a gradual but concerning climb in the numbers of U.S. children who reach their second birthday without having received any recommended vaccines.”Ongoing efforts to raise confidence in vaccines and increase population immunity should be intensified,” the authors wrote in the case report’s conclusion. Physicians caring for people with compromised immune systems, the authors noted, should also ensure that those in close contact with these patients, such as family members and friends, are fully vaccinated.Fast Facts People with weakened immune systems are at risk for contracting vaccine-preventable diseases, such as measles, even if they have been vaccinated. In this case, a 26-year-old Swiss man undergoing treatment for leukemia contracted measles and died from severe complications of the infection, despite being fully vaccinated against measles as a child. Maintaining high enough levels of vaccination coverage in the broader community, also known as herd immunity, can limit the spread of measles and other diseases and help protect those who are especially vulnerable.last_img read more

18Jul/19

Researchers create 3D vascularized proximal tubule model to study renal reabsorption

first_imgImmunofluorescence staining of a 3D bioprinted vascularized proximal tubule with a proximal tubule epithelial marker stained in green in the proximal tubule channel and a vascular endothelial marker stained in red in the adjacent vascular channel. The magnified cross-section illustrates that the two different cell types form luminal perfusable structures in their respective channels. Credit: Wyss Institute at Harvard University Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 5 2019Every day our kidneys tackle the daunting task of continuously cleaning our blood to prevent waste, salt and excess fluid from building up inside our bodies. To achieve this, the kidneys’ approximately one million filtration units (glomeruli) first remove both waste products and precious nutrients from the blood stream, then specialized structures known as the proximal tubules reabsorb the “good” molecules returning them to our bloodstream. While the reabsorptive functions of the proximal tubule can be compromised by drugs, chemicals, or genetic and blood-borne diseases, our understanding of how these effects occur is still limited. To enable the study of renal reabsorption outside the human body, Wyss Institute Core Faculty member Jennifer Lewis, Sc.D., and her team working within the Wyss Institute’s 3D Organ Engineering Initiative that she co-leads, and in collaboration with the Roche Innovation Center Basel in Switzerland, created a 3D vascularized proximal tubule model in which independently perfusable tubules and blood vessels are printed adjacent to one another within an engineered extracellular matrix. This work builds upon a continuously perfused 3D proximal tubule model reported earlier by the team that still was lacking a functional blood vessel compartment. Using their next-generation device, the team has measured the transport of glucose from the proximal tubule to the blood vessels, along with the effects of hyperglycemia, a condition associated with diabetes in patients. Their study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).Lewis is also the Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), the Jianmin Yu Professor of Arts and Sciences and a member of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute.”We construct these living renal devices in a few days and they can remain stable and functional for months,” said first-author Neil Lin, Ph.D., who is a Roche Fellow and Postdoctoral Fellow on Lewis’ team. “Importantly, these 3D vascularized proximal tubules exhibit the desired epithelial and endothelial cell morphologies and luminal architectures, as well as the expression and correct localization of key structural and transport proteins, and factors that allow the tubular and vascular compartments to communicate with each other.”Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaNanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeAs a first step towards testing drugs and modeling diseases, the team induced “hyperglycemia”, a high-glucose condition typical of diabetes and a known risk factor for vascular disease, in their model by circulating a four-fold higher than normal glucose concentration through the proximal tubule compartment. “We found that high levels of glucose transported to endothelial cells in the vascular compartment caused cell damage,” said Kimberly Homan, Ph.D., a co-author on the study and Research Associate in Lewis’ group at the Wyss Institute and SEAS. “By circulating a drug through the tubule that specifically inhibits a major glucose transporter in proximal tubule epithelial cells, we prevented those harmful changes from happening to the endothelial cells in the adjacent vessels.”The team’s immediate focus is to further scale up these models for use in pharmaceutical applications. “Our system could enable the screening of focused drug libraries for renal toxicity and thus help reduce animal experiments,” said Annie Moisan, Ph.D., a co-author and industry collaborator on the study, and Principal Scientist at Roche Innovation Center Basel. “I am thrilled by the continued efforts from us and others to increase the physiological relevance of such models, for example by incorporating patient-specific and diseased cells, since personalized efficacy and safety are the ultimate goals of predicting clinical responses to drugs.””Our new 3D kidney model is an exciting advance as it more fully recapitulates the proximal tubule segments found in native kidney tissue,” said Lewis. “Beyond its immediate applications for drug screening and disease modeling, we are also exploring whether these living devices can be used to augment kidney dialysis.” Currently, life-saving dialysis machines filter blood, but they are unable to retrieve precious nutrients and other species from the filtrate that the body needs for many of its functions, which can cause specific deficiencies and complications down the line. Lewis and her colleagues believe that 3D bioprinted vascularized tubules may lead to improved renal replacement therapies.”This study presents a significant step forward in human kidney engineering that enables human disease and drug-related studies to be carried out over extended periods of time in vitro. It also represents a major step forward for the Wyss Institute’s 3D Organ Engineering Initiative, which aims to generate functional organ replacements with enhanced functionalities for patients in need.” said Wyss Institute Founding Director Donald Ingber, M.D., Ph.D., who is also the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at HMS and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, as well as Professor of Bioengineering at SEAS.Source: https://wyss.harvard.edu/renal-reabsorption-in-living-devices/last_img read more

18Jul/19

Dog walking increases risk of bone fractures in older adults

first_imgDog walking has a number of physical and emotional benefits, and many older people regularly walk dogs to stay active and enjoy the company of their pets. However, the number of older people needing medical treatment for injuries associated with walking dogs has seen a significant increase, up from 1,700 in 2014 to 4,400 in 2017, approximately.A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis formed the basis of the study, with information taken from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System database of the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, which provides anonymous data on product- and activity-related injuries available to the public. It includes around 100 US hospital emergency departments.The team reviewed 1033 fracture cases occurring between 2004 and 2017 in patients of 65 years or older. Their review discovered a sex disparity in injury burden, with women suffering the most fracture cases, urging that older women be made “aware of the risk” of dog ownership.Hip fractures were the most common injury sustained, with the upper extremity being the most frequently injured region, including wrist, upper arm, finger, and shoulder fractures. Out of all patients, 28.7 percent required hospital treatment.Mortality rates related to hip fractures in patients over 65 almost reach 30%. This is due to hip fractures leading to sudden, significant changes in lifestyle, such as decreased activity levels and mobility.The publication acknowledged some limitations to the study, stating, “our findings likely underestimate the morbidity associated with elderly Americans walking leashed dogs.”The study, which is believed to be the first of its kind, only investigated reported fracture cases, and cases from people who visited an emergency room. Other injuries, such as tendon and muscle damage, and patients who did not wish to follow up other types of care were not included in the study.Details like the size of the dogs and whether operative interventions were needed were also not included in the investigation.The study, which was published in JAMA Surgery on March 6th 2019, does not intend to deter older people from staying active by walking dogs. Instead, it aims to draw “attention to an activity that can result in significant injury.”It goes on to say that for “older adults – especially those living alone and with decreased bone mineral density – the risks associated with walking leashed dogs merit consideration.” By Lois Zoppi, BAMar 8 2019Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Older Americans who stay active by dog walking are more likely to fracture a bone than their peers, according to a new study by Penn Medicine researchers. Everyday actions mean everyday consequences. […] While it is important for medicine to sometimes focus on the rarer but devastating conditions such as cancer and heart attacks, we also have to remember that understanding and improving the little things in life can have a dramatic, positive effect.”Jaimo Ahn, MD, Ph.D., Senior Author Discussing their findings, authors of the study wrote that clinicians could help minimize risk of fractures in older people by “advocating for preventative actions, such as obedience training […] or suggesting smaller dog breeds”. Source:Fractures in Elderly Americans Associated With Walking Leashed Dogs. JAMA Surgery. 2019.last_img read more

18Jul/19

Study Involvement of prefrontal cortex areas decreases with aging

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 26 2019Researchers from HSE University and York University have become the first to analyze the results of 82 functional neuroimaging studies on working memory mechanisms in different adult age groups. The meta-analyses showed that across studies the agreement of various areas of the prefrontal cortex decreases with aging, suggesting reorganization of brain function during healthy aging. The results have been published in the paper ‘Meta-analyses of the n-back working memory task: fMRI evidence of age-related changes in prefrontal cortex involvement across the adult lifespan’: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.03.074Working memory is a system that helps keep information readily available as we use it for performing tasks here and now, including complex intellectual operations such as learning, understanding and reasoning. For example, we use this type of memory to detect and remember the most important things in another person’s speech and then give that person a meaningful answer. The resources of working memory are limited, and with age, its size changes.Marie Arsalidou, Zachary Yaple, and Dale Stevens analyzed data on brain activity in 2020 adults, divided into three age groups: young (18-35), middle-aged (35-55), and older adults (55-85). In all the studies, research volunteers played a game called the ‘n-back task’: they were asked to detect and respond whether they had seen the image demonstrated at the moment, ‘n’ positions back. The complexity of the task depends on the value of ‘n’. During an experiment, each study monitored the brain areas that are activated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).Meta-analysis demonstrated that the involvement of prefrontal cortex areas and their coordination during a task showed increased agreement across studies in young people, lower agreement in middle-aged adults, and no significant agreement in older adults. Lack of agreement in older adults suggests increased variability and individual differences in this group. With older age, parietal regions of the cortex are activated more often, which might be a sign of functional re-organization of working memory mechanisms or of these regions’ compensatory function.Related StoriesAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaWearing a hearing aid may mitigate dementia riskStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingThe prefrontal cortex plays a key role in complicated intellectual processes, including the coordination of different brain areas that are activated during the use of working memory.’Brain changes throughout adulthood, and it appears to be more dynamic that we initially thought. Because the original studies did not consistently report performance scores, we analyzed brain responses with the assumption that working memory performance was comparable. Therefore, we cannot say from our study that working memory skills decrease with age. What we can say is that variability in prefrontal cortex activity may suggest differences in strategies used to problem solve across adulthood. This gives a good target for future work to decipher direct relations among age, brain function and performance’ believes one of the study’s authors, Marie Arsalidou, Assistant Professor at the HSE School of Psychology.The results of this study are comparable with the conclusions of the previous meta-analysis of working memory mechanisms in children, which was carried out by Marie Arsalidou together with HSE researcher Zachary Yaple: during n-back task performance, not only prefrontal and parietal cortex regions are activated in children, but also other brain areas. Further research in this area will help us understand how working memory mechanisms change during development in humans. Source:https://iq.hse.ru/en/news/266810949.htmllast_img read more

17Jul/19

Rajnath slams TMC says they created an unruly situation at Silchar airport

first_imgLok Sabha Home Minister Rajnath Singh today accused Trinamool Congress MPs of creating an “unruly situation” at the Silchar airport and said they were detained in view of intelligence inputs received by the Assam government on the law and order situation.Six leaders of the Trinamool Congress were yesterday detained at the Silchar airport while attempting to visit Assam post the publication of the National Register of Citizens (NRC). The six leaders left Assam this morning after overnight detention at the airport. The party has said the detention and “manhandling” of their colleagues at the Silchar airport shows there is an “undeclared emergency” in the country.’Afraid and nervous’In the Lok Sabha, Singh said since there were prohibitory orders in Assam, state officials had “requested” TMC MPs to return from the airport itself. “The Government of Assam had some information and based on intelligence inputs…In view of the prevailing law and order situation and so the situation does not deteriorate, TMC MPs were detained at the Silchar airport,” Singh said.TMC’s Kalyan Banerjee, in his speech, said citizens of India have right to move around anywhere in the country and these MPs had categorically told the state government officer at Silchar airport that “they would not hold any public meeting”.In his speech, Banerjee asked the Government if it was “afraid and nervous” because of the united force of the opposition in the run up to the 2019 general elections and hence had detained the MPs. “Parliamentarians have been deprived of the right to assess the situation arising in the country. There was no injuction or interim order passed by the Supreme Court that political meetings cannot be held in Assam,” Banerjee said.All courtesies extendedMaintaining that the MPs were extended all courtesies, the Home Minister said since there was no return flight to Kolkata or Delhi from Silchar, the MPs spent the night at the Silchar airport guest house and left for Kolkata this morning and have an onward flight to Delhi.“The kind of respect that should be shown to a public representative, similar respect was shown to TMC MPs. With folded hands the District Magistrate requested them to return. But without paying heed to the request, the MPs got into shoving in which two women security personnel also got hurt,” the Home Minister added.Bijoya Chakravarty (BJP) accused the Congress of putting the NRC in cold storage and said TMC MPs went to Assam only to “create tension” and “violence” in the state. She said that nothing can be more “dangerous” than West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee’s statement that there would be “bloodshed and civil war” in Assam.“Assess and discuss”Six Trinamool Congress MPs—Kakoli Ghosh Dastidar, Arpita Ghosh, Mamata Thakur, Ratna De Nag, Sukhendu Sekhar Ray and Nadimul Haque—along two West Bengal state ministers had reached Silchar yesterday afternoon to “assess and discuss” the problems of citizens in the aftermath of NRC.The second list of the NRC, published earlier this week, has left out the names of over 40 lakh people, of which 85-90 per cent are Bengalis, Banerjee said. COMMENTS national politics Sobriety please TMC delegation leave Assam after overnight detention Infiltrators will be thrown out, says Amit Shah Union Home Minister Rajnath Singh speaks in the Lok Sabha (file photo)   –  PTI COMMENT Published on August 03, 2018 SHARE SHARE EMAIL Exclusion from NRC won’t mean automatic removal from voter list: CEC SHARE RELATED last_img read more

17Jul/19

Low wages land availability transparent policies key to investments in Odisha Patnaik

first_imgSHARE SHARE SHARE EMAIL Orissa COMMENT September 12, 2018 naveen-patnaik COMMENTS  Odisha Chief Minister Naveen Patnaik held an investors meet here on Wednesday, ahead of the ‘Make in Odisha’ conclave in November, with the State highlighting low wages and land availability as competitive advantages to attract investment.Patnaik said his administration has demonstrated its commitment to deliver projects on ground “using the mantra of teamwork, technology and transparency.”New projects“In the last six months, we conducted ground-breaking ceremonies of 50 projects, entailing an investment of over ₹17,000 crore,” he said at the function.The State government had organised a similar event in Mumbai in August, inviting industrialists to the ‘Make in Odisha’ event in Bhubaneswar between November 11-15. Japan is the partner country this year.Jindal Steel and Power Ltd Chairman Naveen Jindal and OYO Room founder CEO Ritesh Agarwal were among the industrialists who attended the meeting.Jindal said Odisha has a lot of advantages such as better connectivity through ports, improved infrastructure and a stable government, and the group has invested over ₹45,000 crore in the State.Friendly policiesThe OYO CEO said that the State policies are investor-friendly and attractive, and the company has become a leading hotel chain in the State in the last two years.SMS group India MD and CEO Marc Hoffmann and Shahi Group Chairman Harish Ahuja were also present.In his address, Patnaik said Odisha is a mineral-rich State, accounting for 54 per cent aluminium production and the State government is preparing a Vision 2030 document for development of ancillary units in the metal sector.Odisha is also a power surplus State where electricity generation has trebled and road network has gone up by 50 per cent. The port capacity has increased from 20.5 MMT to 190 MMT, he said. “Odisha has a visible start-up initiative; 250 start-ups have been registered and we are posed to be among the top three start-up of India by 2020,” he added.Competitive advantageLater, talking to the media, State Industry Secretary Sanjeev Chopra said the State has a competitive advantage over well-known investor destinations such as Maharashtra and Gujarat because of cheap labour, land availability and low cost of living. He said that dedicated sector-specific clusters and over 1,20,000 acres of land bank were available for industrial development.He outlined that 65 per cent of the ₹2 lakh crore investment committed in the first make in Odisha event 2016 were under various stages of implementation. Published onlast_img read more