BRAVO DR. ELWOOD DUNN AND MR. JOHN MORLU, III: YOUR SUGGESTIONS FORM A SOLID…

first_imgThere was no need, it seemed to me, to reject outright the outsourcing of the Ebola fight and to insist on Liberians doing it alone, on their own terms, as some significant individuals have suggested. On the other hand, there was also no need to reject, outright, Liberians trying to get a handle on the Ebola epidemic by doing it on their own as a sovereign nation. The truth, it seems, is somewhere in the middle and that is what Dr. Dunn (The Liberian Observer September 10, 2014 https://www.liberianobserver.com/editorials/ebola-threat-international-peace-and-security and The Perspective September 11, 2014 http://www.theperspective.org/2014/0910201401.php) and Mr. Morlu (The Perspective September 9, 2014 http://www.theperspective.org/2014/0909201404.php) have provided for us. What we need is a constructive cooperation, a partnership, with the international health organizations, identified both by Morlu and Dunn, to battle and win the fight against this Ebola scourge. These organizations, in addition to the financial resources they can bring also have the needed technical and scientific skills and the accumulated historical knowledge to help the Ebola situation significantly. With such a joint venture between Liberia and the international health organizations we can learn and get the expertise and resources which may help us to set up lasting institutions of our own to combat future crises. I commend Dunn and Morlu for providing us the framework for such a cooperative undertaking. Let us combine their two recommendations to form the base organization for  the cooperative venture to fight the scourge of Ebola.Dr. Dunn provided us the international framework for such a cooperative venture. The five points he recommended for accomplishing this international cooperative venture should be taken seriously and implemented immediately. His call for prominent African leaders including our own Madam Leymah Gbowee to respond openly and actively to the crisis is significant in expanding the context.And it is his call for prominent African leaders including our Nobel Peace Prize laureate, Leymah Gbowee that connects his recommendations to the three-point recommendation of Mr. John Morlu 111. Mr. Morlu frames his recommendations with a focus on Liberian participation and he recommends significant Liberians to be included, such as Senator Nyonblee Kanga-Lawrence and one could add Madam Gbowee to this list. To this Liberian list I will suggest adding: The Dean of the Arthur Grimes Law School, Professor David A. B. Jallah, Dr. Joe Diggs, Mr. Kenneth Best, Mr. John Morlu 111, Dr. Ayele Ajavon and Dr. Elwood Dunn. These plus others could form the Liberian contingent of the Ebola Eradication group. As both Dunn and Morlu suggested, the international health organizations like MSF, WHO etc, can name those who will constitute their contingent and the two groups will form the institutional base for the fight against Ebola. Of course the American military can help as they have started to do but they will have to be under the over all rubric of this organization. This group or institution will have to be given the legal and constitutional basis for functioning in Liberia. It is urgent that we establish this immediately.However, all these will not work and the monies and resources generated can easily be swallowed up and squandered if there is no transparency or accountability. This, to me, is the significance of Mr. Morlu’s insistence that the institution so set up “Ask the European Union or American Government to appoint a Chief Accountant … to manage the Ebola money. This will send a clear message that Liberia is ready for accountability”. This, in my judgment, is very important because corruption has, for long, crippled and incapacitated us in building our Nation. Corruption is not only eating up our resources and exporting them to the developed countries but also consuming our birthright in the lots and property we sell or mortgage to foreigners. We need a credible outside accountant to control the recalcitrant edges of our loose and undisciplined money-management habits.Dr. Dunn and Mr. Morlu 111 have given us the framework for a viable organization to combat Ebola in Liberia. Let us move very fast in implementing their recommendations.About the authorDr. Igolima T. D. Amachree can be reached at it-amachree@wiu.edu or iamachree@yahoo.com.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Immigrant groups file suit over protective-visa law

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week Homeland Security’s U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which issues visas, declined to comment on the suit. “We’re looking at taking our time to ensure that the final regulations we put out are concise and clear and complete,” said USCIS spokesman Chris Bentley. Regulations for a similar visa created under the same law, which allows victims of human trafficking to remain in the United States, were issued in 2002. Schey said there’s no excuse for the government to take this long on the U-visa. Gail Pendleton, a Boston-based immigration attorney and co- chairwoman of National Network to End Violence Against Immigrant Women, said she believes the delay is emblematic of the nation’s ambivalence over immigration. “Undocumented immigrants are being blamed for all the ills of our society, so there is a lot of pressure on the agency on the enforcement side,” she said, “but you also have a Congress that understands the overarching need to help victims of crimes and help the criminal system to get at the perpetrators.” Lawyers for undocumented immigrants who’ve been victims of violent crimes filed a federal lawsuit Tuesday against the Department of Homeland Security for failing to issue protective visas Congress created five years ago. The 2000 law approved visas for victims of violent crimes who cooperate with law enforcement investigations or prosecution of crimes. The visas allowed them to remain in the United States and apply for permanent residency after three years. But regulations detailing how to apply for the U-visa were never published, and no visas have ever been issued. “Congress enacted the law with the dual goal of making communities safer … and as a humane gesture to those immigrants who cooperate with law enforcement agents,” said Peter Schey of the L.A.-based Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, one of three groups that filed the suit here. “How can the government expect immigrants to comply with the law when it is not complying with its own laws?” The suit was filed on behalf of nine immigrants from California, Texas and Arizona, including several children. Attorneys in the case are seeking class-action status. People who apply for the U-Visa can obtain “deferred action” status, which offers some protection and allows them to work. But they cannot leave the country, and it’s not clear whether time under the deferred status will count toward permanent residency. As of Tuesday, 3,011 people had requested the deferred action status, including family members of victims, and 2,132 requests were granted, Bentley said. Still, a significant number of immigrants who are already in deportation proceedings are not receiving the deferred action, Pendleton said. And USCIS has done little to publicize the visas, meaning many immigrants don’t know they can apply. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more