Round-up: Pedro injured and QPR are looking for striker

first_imgPedro has been ruled out of Chelsea’s opening Premier League game of the season after picking up an injury.The Spaniard has an ankle problem and has not recovered in time for Saturday’s visit of Burnley.Pedro suffered the injury during Sunday’s Community Shield game against Arsenal at Wembley, where he was sent off.Boss Antonio Conte confirmed: “Pedro is not available. He is suffering from an injury in the Arsenal game and was not able to recover. It is a knock in his ankle.”Pedro would have been an option to replace the suspended Victor Moses at right wing-back.Conte added that Moses’ ban could lead to a debut for summer signing Antonio Rudiger – a move that would probably see Cesar Azpilicueta move to wing-back.Embed from Getty ImagesAsked if Rudiger might be involved, Conte said: “He could be – also because there is no Moses.“It could be an opportunity to start the game for Rudiger. I have been impressed with him. He is a strong player with a good personality.” Blues even more committed, says ConteEmbed from Getty ImagesConte says Chelsea’s commitment during pre-season has been ever better than last season when they won the Premier League.There have been reports that Conte is unhappy with the size of the squad and the club’s summer transfer activity.But Italian said: “Honestly I am pleased because we are working very well with the team and this group of players and the commitment is incredible and also better than the last season.“I am very happy because these players are working so hard. We are trying to improve.” Baker’s new deal and loan moveEmbed from Getty ImagesLewis Baker has signed a new five-year Chelsea contract and completed a season-long loan move to Middlesbrough. Baker, 22, spent last season on loan at Vitesse in the Netherlands, scoring 10 goals in 33 appearances, and helped England to the semi-finals of the European Under-21s Championships this summer.“It’s going to be an exciting season, there are a lot of games in the Championship,” Baker told Boro’s website.“I’m here to give my input and hopefully get the club back to the Premier League.” Morata needs time – ConteEmbed from Getty ImagesAlvaro Morata will need more time to fully understand the key role he has to play as Chelsea’s main striker, according to Conte.Morata joined from Real Madrid in July with the Blues having already started their pre-season training.“Alvaro is working very well and is improving a lot,” Conte said.“In these 10 days he is improving his physical condition and is starting to understand what we want, but he needs time to understand to adapt to our style of football.“It is normal for me, and also for players that start to work with me, that they need time to adapt to our style of football.“A striker is a really important role and it is very important to understand which is the position I want during the game. It is more difficult to adapt than with the other roles.” Bees would want £2m+ for DeanEmbed from Getty ImagesBrentford would want £2m plus add-ons to sell defender Harlee Dean.The centre-back, who is in the final year of his contract, is of interest to Sheffield Wednesday, Hull City and Leeds United.Dean, 26, has discussed a new deal at Griffin Park but is waiting to see whether a club comes in for him before making a decision on his future.Boss Dean Smith has said Dean will not regain the captaincy unless the player signs a new deal. LuaLua return confirmedEmbed from Getty ImagesQPR have confirmed Kazenga LuaLua’s return on a six-month loan from Brighton.West London Sport recently revealed that Rangers were set to bring back the 26-year-old winger ahead of this weekend’s game against Sheffield Wednesday. He joined the R’s on loan in January and made 11 appearances for them last season, nine of them as a substitute.The new loan deal went through in time for LuaLua to be available for the Wednesday game and he is also able to play for Rangers in the Carabao Cup. QPR injury newsEmbed from Getty ImagesQPR will be without striker Idrissa Sylla and winger Yeni Ngbakoto for Saturday’s trip to Sheffield Wednesday.Sylla picked up a knock to the head in Tuesday’s 1-0 win EFL Cup win against Northampton Town, while Ngbakoto – scorer of the winning goal – is sidelined with an ankle problem picked up in training.Three other Rangers players have also been ruled out – midfielder Jordan Cousins (hamstring) and centre-back Grant Hall (knee tendonitis) remain injured, while Steven Caulker is still short of match fitness, despite 90 minutes against the Cobblers.Striker Matt Smith, who required six stitches to a face wound in midweek, is fit for the trip to Hillsborough. Rangers look at loan optionsQPR are considering a number of strikers as a potential loan signing before the transfer window closes.Manager Ian Holloway had hoped to sign a forward on a permanent deal this summer.However, budgetary restrictions, largely resulting from Financial Fair Play rules, mean the club almost certainly need to trim their squad before being able to buy.Steven Caulker leaving for Celtic would significantly reduce QPR’s wage bill and at one stage there was an expectation that the move would happen, but now the defender is expected to stay.Rangers would consider offers for a number of their players, but apart from talks with Celtic over Caulker there has not been so much as an enquiry about any of the first-team squad.That limits the club’s options in the transfer market and makes the arrival of a striker on loan rather than on a permanent basis more likely. Woodrow plays in Under-23 gameCauley Woodrow played 45 minutes as Fulham’s Under-23s were beaten 2-1 by their Middlesbrough counterparts on Friday.Sean Kavanagh, Matt O’Riley and George Williams also started the game. Stephen Humphrys scored Fulham’s goal. Middlesex loseEmbed from Getty ImagesMiddlesex left themselves with too much to do to overhaul Essex to deliver a blow to their hopes of making the T20 Blast knockout stages.Leg-spinner Nathan Sowter blasted a hole in the middle of the Essex innings with career-best T20 figures of 4-23, but Adam Wheater’s 21-ball 43 laid the foundations for the home win.Ravi Bopara and Mohammad Amir then bowled miserly four-over spells as several Middlesex batsmen failed to capitalise on starts. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Corning High boys basketball captures third straight shootout title

first_imgCorning >> The Corning High boys basketball team has an extremely deep and balanced rotation. On Saturday night the Cardinals utilized a lot of their parts as a way to win their own tournament for a third straight year with a 66-51 win over Durham at the 17th annual Corning Shootout. Corey Busta dropped in a game-high 19 points, earning tournament MVP honors, while fellow seniors Brendan Hoag and Noah Zoppi were selected all-tournament with 17 and 13 points respectively for Corning (13-2).Hoa …last_img

Science Journal Takes Political Sides

first_imgIt might seem unusual or even improper for a science journal to encourage its readers to vote for a particular presidential candidate, especially for voters in a different country than its publishers’ domicile.  Nature Aug. 5 contained two such articles that could hardly be defended as non-partisan.  An editorial1 said in ostensibly neutral terms, “Researchers should seize an opportunity to make their voices heard, whatever their political persuasion,” but made it abundantly clear what that persuasion should be.  “The Bush administration has been heavily criticized in scientific quarters,” it says, and reports on the Union of Concerned Scientists claiming that Bush has been guilty of “the politicization of science.”  Kerry, however is not so criticized; the editorial quotes a group of scientists that claims “John Kerry will restore science to its appropriate place in government and bring it back into the White House.”  Though trying to appear neutral, the editorial seems clearly tilted left.    That leftward stance is reinforced by a news article in the same issue2 that gives prominent coverage to Nobel laureates who are campaigning for Kerry.  It has nothing positive to say about Bush: just allegations, criticisms and the anger of certain scientists, with no opportunity for rebuttal.  It mentions nothing about Bush’s space initiatives for NASA or any other accomplishments.  Kerry, in contrast, is cast in an entirely positive light: for instance, “Already, science has taken an unusually high profile in the Kerry campaign.  Kerry’s wife, Teresa Heinz Kerry, mentioned the Hubble Space Telescope and the Cassini mission to Saturn in her speech at the Democratic National Convention last week.”    Science has been a little more nonpartisan lately.  Last week it gave Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham3 an uncontested column on Bush’s Climate Policy, and this week, it presented a more balanced view of the election campaign as it pertains to science: David Malakoff4 presented both sides of the controversy over stem cell research.  Nevertheless, conservatives will find evidence of bias in certain statements, such as the prominence given to Matthew Nisbet (Ohio State) commenting on Kerry’s making stem cell research a campaign issue.  Malakoff quotes Nisbet: “’It allowed Kerry to highlight a major policy difference between the candidates on a health issue that is relevant to millions of Americans,’ he says.  ‘It also allowed him to reinforce reservations that undecided voters may already have about Bush being ‘an ideologue who doesn’t listen to experts who hold other views.’”  These charges are only weakly rebutted in Malakoff’s article.1Editorial, “On the campaign trail,” Nature 430, 593 (05 August 2004); doi:10.1038/430593a.2Geoff Brumfiel and Emma Marris, “Nobel laureates spearhead effort to put Kerry in the White House,” Nature 430, 595 (05 August 2004); doi:10.1038/430595a.3Spencer Abraham, “The Bush Administration’s Approach to Climate Change,” Science, Vol 305, Issue 5684, 616-617, 30 July 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.1098630].4David Malakoff, “The Calculus of Making Stem Cells a Campaign Issue,” Science, Vol 305, Issue 5685, 760, 6 August 2004, [DOI: 10.1126/science.305.5685.760].We predicted last year that a survey would find academic scientists to be predominantly liberal Democrats (see 09/22/2003 editorial), and now we have evidence right from Nature’s editorial page: it says plainly, “In the current polarized political climate, it is hardly surprising that some scientists should swing behind Kerry in this way — the research community traditionally votes overwhelmingly Democratic.”  Let no one conclude that this means smart people vote Democrat.  These are the ones that brought us sunbathing fish evolving into humans, remember? (see 08/03/2004 headline).  No; rather, it means two things: the (1) Darwin Party that rules Big Science and the journals cannot tolerate anyone who believes in God and absolute moral standards, and (2) Big Science needs its entitlements to keep its Starving Storytellers welfare state going (see 12/22/2003 commentary).  From day one, Nature was a mouthpiece for Charlie Darwin’s musketeers (see 03/04/2004 commentary).  Since Darwin described himself as “liberal or radical” (see 02/13/2004 headline), it is not surprising his mouthpiece continues to be a propaganda machine for political liberalism as well as the moral relativism that fits leftist ideology and Darwinian theory like hand and glove (see 06/28/2004, 06/07/2004, 06/03/2004 and 05/17/2004 headlines, for instance).(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Hops conference next month

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The hops industry is booming in Ohio, and organizers of The Ohio State University Hops Conference and Trade Show on Feb. 24-25 have brewed up a program that will keep the learning flowing for beginner and advanced growers alike.“There was an estimated 200 acres of hops planted in Ohio on 80 farms in 2016, up from 10 acres on four farms in 2014,” said Brad Bergefurd, horticulture specialist with Ohio State University Extension and one of the conference organizers. The event is co-sponsored by the Ohio Hop Growers Guild.Ohio’s growing number of breweries require flowers of the hop plant as the main ingredient providing bitter notes as a balance to the sweetness contributed by malt sugars. An interest in locally grown ingredients has spurred growth in Ohio’s hops production.This is the first year the annual conference will be held at The Ohio State University’s South Centers, Bergefurd’s home base. The meeting, beginning at 8 a.m. Friday and ending at 4 p.m. Saturday, will be held at the South Centers’ Endeavor Center, 1862 Shyville Road, just south of Piketon.“By bringing the conference here, we’ll be able to offer tours of our research hop yards,” Bergefurd said.“And we’ll also be able to show participants our new galvanized hop trellis system that we are testing in partnership with a private company,” he added.“This is a first in the United States. If the prototype works, then we can save farmers from having to replace the standard wooden poles, which growers have relied upon for over 100 years, that need to be replaced every 20 to 25 years or less.”Participants will also be able to see a demonstration of the center’s new hops harvester equipment, purchased last summer from HopsHarvester in New York.“This harvesting method can help save growers labor, reduce labor costs, increase harvest efficiency and the timeliness of harvesting, which leads to a better-quality hop,” Bergefurd said.The venue is smaller than conference locations in the past, so participation will be more limited than usual this year, he added. In the past, the conference has drawn about 250 participants.Registration is $150 for both days or $100 for a single day, and includes lunch and snacks, a flash drive with the presentations, a conference booklet with vendor, speaker and other program information, and access to the trade show. An optional Friday night banquet is an additional $40 (space is limited). Information and a link to online registration is available at go.osu.edu/OSUHopsConference2017.Each day will feature several general sessions and breakout sessions split between beginner and advanced topics. Presentations include:Hop Production Economic Analysis: Can We Make Money at This?Connecting with Your Customer/BuyerBrewers Panel: How Hops Are Used in the Brewing Process and What Defines Good Hop Quality?Keeping Hops Healthy: Disease Diagnosis, Forecasting and ControlThe Importance of Thorough and Accurate Spray Coverage for the Hop YardGrowing Cover Crops to Improve Soil Health, Nutrient and Soil QualityHop Plant PropagationHop Yard Designs: Which Is Best for You?Efficient Hop Growing and Processing PracticesThe Importance of Selecting the Proper Nutrient Sources and Timely Fertility for Hop ProductionSpider Mite Control in the Hop YardWeed Control Herbicides and Drift ControlMechanical Harvesting Options for HopsFor a complete schedule, see go.osu.edu/hops2017agenda.Vendors interested in participating in the trade show can also register online. Cost is $250 for both days or $150 for one day. For more information, contact Charissa Gardner at the South Centers at gardner.1148@osu.edu or 740-289-2071, ext. 132. Online vendor registration is at go.osu.edu/OSUHopsConferenceVENDOR2017.last_img read more

The Faceless Men And Women Of The US Open

(And the slights aren’t limited to photos: At least one American’s photo was accompanied by an Italian flag for one of her doubles matches.)By the first Friday of the Open, the tournament had added photos for many players, including del Potro, Thiem and Almagro. It took a little longer for many women, including Konjuh and Sevastova, who finally got their photos added by that Sunday.Not all the players minded their missing photos. Sevastova, after upsetting Johanna Konta to reach the quarterfinals, said in response to my question at her postmatch news conference that she’d noticed her photo was finally added. “Now I have a photo,” she said. “Now I saw my photo.” Having no photo was better than if the U.S. Open had just used her “WTA picture with short hair,” she said. “I didn’t like it, actually, so it was OK without [a] picture.”The U.S. Open provides an unusual opportunity to check out what the faceless men and women of sport have in common because the tournament lists hundreds of players, all gathered on one website. On the first Friday of the tournament, I did an exhaustive survey of all 579 players on the page — the number shifts during the tournament as draws are finalized for events that start later in the tournament, such as juniors. More than one third of the players — 211 — were missing photos. That includes 44 players who were in the men’s or women’s singles draws, the most prominent events at the Open. In addition to Konjuh and Sevastova, that list included Naomi Osaka, who’d just lost a third-round thriller in Arthur Ashe Stadium to Madison Keys; Laura Siegemund, who was playing seven-time major champ Venus Williams in Ashe the next day; 2015 French Open quarterfinalist Alison Van Uytvanck; Laura Robson, who made the fourth round at the 2012 U.S. Open; and Americans Christian Harrison and Danielle Collins.It’s no coincidence that more women than men were missing: According to Widmaier, there was a lag in adding women’s photos even after the problem was identified. (He wasn’t sure why.)So what factors decided who got a photo by the fifth day of the tournament and who didn’t? I checked a wide range of factors,1By grabbing data off each player’s U.S. Open page and running a regression between whether the player had a photo on the night of the tournament’s first Friday and the player’s other characteristics. and the determinants of whether a player had a profile pic weren’t surprising: Americans, players active on tour and veterans were mostly likely to have a photo. Being from the U.S. increased a player’s chances of having a picture on the site by 30 percentage points. With every singles match a competitor played this year, his or her chances went up by 2 percentage points. A year of age added 3 percentage points.2The percentages assume a linear relationship, which wouldn’t apply at extremes. (We don’t think someone who has played 60 singles matches this year has a greater than 100 percent chance of having a photo.) The exact percentages depend on which variables we include. I also tested, for instance, peak singles ranking, career matches and matches won, but those all are closely linked to both singles matches played this year and to age. So perhaps the most surprisingly snubbed people were the American women’s doubles pair of Ashley Weinhold, 27, and Caitlin Whoriskey, 28. Their faces remained missing on the second Thursday of the tournament. (Then again, neither has ever been ranked in the top 100 in singles or doubles.)Konjuh, who is 18, said she understood why she didn’t have a photo. “Like probably most of the other players that are young or coming didn’t have pictures,” she said in her news conference.Widmaier promised a more completist approach to player photography at the 2017 Open: “It will be improved upon next year.” Anastasija Sevastova and Ana Konjuh defied expectations and their low rankings — both outside the top 40 — to reach the U.S. Open quarterfinals. They have something else in common: For the first week of the tournament, where their photos were supposed to appear on the U.S. Open website and app, there instead appeared black rectangles with the flags of their countries and the words “NO BIO PHOTO.”“I saw on the live score, yeah, on the U.S. Open app, yeah, it says, like, ‘bio’ or something,” Konjuh said when I asked about her absent photo at her news conference after she upset Agnieszka Radwanska in the fourth round.Every sport has these faceless men and women, the ones who aren’t supposed to make the team or get off the bench, who are so new they haven’t been photographed, who may get rushed in front of a digital camera so media staff can get a snap worth posting.Tennis majors face a special challenge in filling those blank rectangles: Up to 128 players enter each of the men’s and women’s qualifying draws, and more than 100 others enter each of the men’s and women’s singles draws. There can be more than 100 players competing only in doubles, and an additional 100 or more might enter only the juniors or juniors qualifying draws. As of the two-week event’s middle Sunday, there were 698 players on the U.S. Open player page.But some of the snubbed U.S. Open players are hardly nobodies. Early in the tournament, 2009 U.S. Open champion Juan Martin del Potro, No. 10 Dominic Thiem and former No. 9 Nicolas Almagro were among those missing photos. Asked about them on the first Thursday of the tournament, Chris Widmaier, spokesman for the U.S. Tennis Association, which runs the U.S. Open, said, “It’s a disappointment.” I asked if it’s a priority to get photos for the players — all of whom have been professionally photographed at dozens if not hundreds of matches worldwide, and who have pictures that appear on the ATP and WTA websites and on their U.S. Open credentials. “It is now,” Widmaier said. read more

NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Full-Time Customer Service Representative at Stafford Manufacturing Corp.Full-Time Research Associate at CuriRx, Inc.Full-Time Research Assistant at CuriRx, Inc.Full-Time Financial Analyst at Charles River LabsFull-Time General Service Manager at Limbach Facility ServicesFull-Time Buyer II at SymboticFull-Time Information Systems Security Manager at L3 Technologies Full-Time Accounts Payable Clerk at AramarkFull-Time Customer Service Specialist at Super Service TodayFull-Time SOX Manager at NRS Global Partners (Contract)(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 50 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of August 18, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

Wilmingtons Symbotic To Host Open House During National Robotics Week

first_imgBOSTON, MA — In celebration of National Robotics Week (April 6-14, 2019), MassRobotics is hosting a series of statewide open houses at innovative robotics organizations shaping the new Massachusetts technology landscape and the state’s ever-growing robotics cluster.One of these open houses will take place at Symbotic (200 Research Drive) in Wilmington on Friday, April 12 at 11am. Learn more and register HERE.“Massachusetts is a global hub of robot technology development and innovation,” said Tom Ryden, executive director, MassRobotics. “As part of RoboWeek, we hope to increase the public awareness of the importance of the robotics industry in Massachusetts and its tremendous impact on the future by providing an inside look into some of the area’s robotics companies. These events are ideal for investors, those looking to advance their careers in robotics, government officials invested in the Commonwealth’s technology and innovation industry, and businesses interested in collaborating with these smart companies.”From Monday, April 8 to Friday, April 12, robot enthusiasts can get behind-the-scenes tours at Massachusetts’ best-known robotics companies, including:iRobot – Tour the Cool Stuff Museum and Family Innovation Lab, learn about the company and see a demo of a robot in action. Bedford, MA.6 River Systems – Learn about Chuck, a collaborative mobile robot, and how the company is building fulfillment solutions for the warehouses of tomorrow. Waltham, MA.DunkWorks – Part of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Center for Marine Robotics, see how DunkWorks is accelerating the path of technology to the ocean. Woods Hole, MA.Piaggio Fast Forward – Meet gita, the sustainable, mobile-carrier that follows people on the go while transporting up to 45 pounds and learn about the company’s vision of a sustainable mobility ecology with healthy lifestyles and social connectivity available to all. Boston, MA.Symbotic – Learn how to simplify material handling from manufacturer to store shelf with the combination of proprietary software and mathematics. Wilmington, MA.Artaic – Discover how Artaic is using robotic technology to customize, design and fabricate award-winning mosaics for projects of any size. Boston, MA.FLIR Unmanned Ground Systems – As the world’s leading provider of battle-tested Unmanned Ground Vehicles, get an inside look at how these robots help keep troops, first responders and the public safe. Chelmsford, MA.UMass Lowell NERVE and iHub – As part of the monthly Mass Innovation Nights event series, network with members of the local innovation community and view presentations by local startups and entrepreneurs. To register, visit https://mass.innovationnights.com/events/mass-innovation-nights-121. Lowell, MA.MassRobotics – Meet the masterminds behind the innovation hub for robotics and connected devices. Get a deep dive in how our programming is nurturing the next generation of talent and promoting economic growth. Boston, MA.For registration details, tour dates and times, click HERE.About MassRoboticsMassRobotics is the result of the collective work of a group of engineers, rocket scientists and entrepreneurs with a shared vision to create a strong, vibrant robotics and IoT ecosystem in Massachusetts. MassRobotics’ mission is to help create and scale the next generation of successful robotics and connected devices companies by providing entrepreneurs and innovative robotics/automation startups with the workspace and resources they need to develop, prototype, test and commercialize their products and solutions. See www.massrobotics.org for details.(NOTE: The above press release is from MassRobotics.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWhat’s Happening In Wilmington This Week (April 8-14)In “5 Things To Do Today”NOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of August 4, 2019)In “Business”NOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of June 30, 2019)In “Business”last_img read more

ERD to publish national human development report

first_imgSpeakers at a Consultation meeting on publishing of National Human Development Report organized by ERD on Sunday. Photo: CollectedThe government is planning to restart publication of National Human Development Report (NHDR) to facilitate policy dialogue and better understanding of development dynamics, says a press release.The NHDR was published in 1992 for the first time by the government but it did not continue later.The Economic Relations Division (ERD) will publish the report with the support of United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).The decision was taken at a meeting organised by the ERD at the meeting room of Executive Committee of National Economic Council (ECNEC) on Sunday.A total of 40 representatives of different ministries and private sector research organisations took part in the consultation meeting.Speaking at the meeting, Selim Jahan, director of UNDP Human Development Report Office in New York, said that the increase of GDP growth and infrastructural development alone cannot guarantee the human development.“Focus should be the improvement of living standard of the people,” he added.Discussants suggested forming an advisory council to guide the authors’ panel in choosing the themes and contents of the report.Chaired by ERD secretary Kazi Shofiqul Azam, the meeting was addressed by member of general economic division’s member Shamsul Alam, UNDP’s country director Sudipto Mukerjee, CPD’s research director Khondaker Golam Moazzem, and senior research fellow of Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies (BIDS) Nazneen Ahmed.last_img read more

How Coaching Can Help Women Get Ahead in the Tech Industry

first_img This story originally appeared on Ellevate October 15, 2018 Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global 5 min read Women in technology face well-known barriers to career development. Only 25 percent of “computing” professionals are women, according to the National Center for Women and Information Technology, and the percentage shrinks moving up the corporate ladder. In fact, only 11 percent of executives at Silicon Valley tech companies are women. And the numbers for women of color are even worse.Related: 3 Ways Women Can Turn Fear of Failure Into Fearless ActionThe causes of this imbalance are many and still debated. They include bias (both conscious and unconscious), structural barriers and organizational culture. In addition, research has found that women working in traditionally male-dominated industries and functions (like technology) have access to fewer leadership development opportunities than men in those fields.As a result, while 80 percent of women in science, engineering and technology report “loving their work,” the female attrition rate in such fields is higher than it is for men. In “high-tech” industries, they leave at more than twice the rate as men (41 percent compared to 17 percent).What’s a talented woman to do when she feels torn between staying and leaving? What’s her organization to do to make sure she stays?What is coaching?Coaching is an increasingly popular strategy used to help talented women build their skills and advance in their careers. Many organizations make the investment themselves in coaching for their “high-potential” employees, and research has shown that coaching can be particularly effective in helping to narrow the gender gap in leadership development.Coaching is a one-on-one relationship in which a professional coach works with an employee or client to achieve personal professional goals, providing feedback and direction that facilitates improvement. Sometimes, organizations or individuals hire coaches from outside the organization. Increasingly, though, they’re training managers or other employees to serve as coaches inside the organization, especially as a way to support performance or supplement more formal learning and development programs.Related: 11 Strategies to Lead and Succeed as a Minority WomanBenefits for the organizationIn addition to the obvious benefits of demonstrating support and encouragement for female employees, an organization profits (literally) in other ways from providing or supporting coaching for its high-potential women. Coaching improves employee engagement, productivity and retention, as well as business management and team effectiveness.As individuals learn to manage relationships better, the entire organization benefits from those improved relationships. Now that organizations are starting to use coaching across levels rather than just for executives, they are building resilience across teams. Coaching also supports recruitment, especially of the ever-in-demand millennial generation.Benefits for the womanSo, what specifically happens in those coaching conversations, and how can they help women in tech?While coaching is not a replacement for therapy, mentoring, or training, it can provide related outcomes and be an important part of a more comprehensive personal and professional development plan. Coaching can support improved leadership, communication, and time management skills and improve self-confidence, relationships, and work-life balance.Popular goals include:Working toward a leadership role.Improving professional performance.Improving relationships.Increasing self-confidence.Managing work-life balance.Sound familiar? Many of these challenges — especially advancing into leadership and managing work-life balance — are common among women in technology.Recent research revealed promising data about coaching, especially regarding its potential to equalize leadership development access between men and women. In a 2017 survey, men were 50 percent more likely than women to say their leadership training was “very effective.” However, when respondents reported having received coaching as part of their leadership development, that difference almost disappeared.If you’re a woman in technology wanting to move into a leadership position, it may be worth finding a coach outside the organization to help you build your skills. However, you may also ask a senior member of your team — one whom you respect and believe has the time and people skills to do the job — to be an informal, on-the-job coach. Make sure this person is willing to coach you and also understands what the role of a coach is (for instance, it’s not the same as a mentor). You might even find that there are people in your organization who have been trained in coaching skills.Related: How to Listen to Your Intuition and Create Your Dream LifeIf you’re a business leader, especially in tech, who wants to improve gender diversity across your organization, consider bringing in an outside coach, or offering training to managers to help them learn to coach high-potential women. You might find that the costs of losing your female employees far outweigh the costs of coaching them.(By Taryn Oesch, CPTM. Oesch is an award-winning editor at Training Industry, Inc., an online media and content marketing company for the corporate training sector.) Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Register Now »last_img read more