17Oct/19

Lawyers spar over conflicting accounts in sailors sexual assault case

first_imgHALIFAX – A military judge is expected to render a decision Monday in the court martial of a Halifax sailor accused of sexually assaulting a subordinate.Lawyers for the prosecution and defence gave closing arguments in a Halifax military court on Saturday, both of which largely turned on the question of whose version of the events aboard the HMCS Athabaskan in November 2015 is to believed — defendant Master Seaman Daniel Cooper or the alleged victim, whose name is protected by a publication ban.Prosecutor Maj. Dominic Martin began his submissions by arguing that Cooper and the junior officer’s accounts of the night of drinking before the alleged incident were “pretty compatible” up until when the sailors returned to their sleeping quarters on the navy destroyer, which was docked in Spain as part of a NATO exercise.But that’s where their testimonies diverge, lawyers on both sides said.Cooper, a naval communicator at Canadian Forces Base Halifax, has pleaded not guilty to sexual assault and ill treatment of a subordinate.The alleged victim has testified that he awoke in his bunk to find Cooper performing oral sex on him.Under cross-examination Saturday morning, Cooper maintained that he twice asked the junior sailor if he wanted to engage in sexual activity and the other man agreed.Martin questioned Cooper about what he characterized as inconsistencies between his testimony before the court martial this week and portions of a filmed interview with military police Cooper gave in March 2016, which was voluntary and not sworn under oath.Cooper told the court martial he withheld certain details during the interview because he did not feel comfortable talking to investigators about a homosexual encounter, but said the account he gave investigators was largely accurate aside from the omission of what he says was a consensual sex act with the junior sailor.“It’s not an easy thing to talk about, going into the details of a homosexual act with people who aren’t homosexual,” Cooper said, adding that interactions with military police prior to the interview led him to believe the investigators were not interested in hearing his side of the story.Cooper testified Friday that after a night of drinking, he and the junior sailor went back to their sleeping quarters, and as they were talking by the other man’s locker, he noticed that he had become aroused.Cooper said he asked the junior sailor if he wanted to become intimate and the other man agreed. Cooper told the court martial he then followed the other man to his bunk, asking him another time if he wanted to become intimate before engaging in sexual activity.He said he performed oral sex on the subordinate, and that the man didn’t tell him to stop until about 10 minutes later when he sat up and said, “I’m not gay,” at which point Cooper said he immediately returned to his own bunk.During closing arguments, Martin asserted that Cooper fabricated the alleged conversation near the locker in an effort to “absolve” himself of guilt.Defence counsel Maj. Phillipe Boutin argued that it was the alleged victim’s account that lacked credibility past “the point of no return.”Boutin said the alleged victim testified that he could not remember many details during the period of time in question, especially those that may put him in “a bad light.”However, Boutin said, the junior sailor was “adamant” that the alleged conversation by his locker did not occur.Martin said the alleged victim had no reason to take note of the details of the night the incident allegedly occured until he was awoken in his bunk to a superior sailor performing oral sex on him, at which point he became very “attentive.”On Wednesday, the alleged victim told the military court it was dark and he couldn’t really see, but he recognized Cooper’s voice.He became emotional in the courtroom as he spoke about fearing for his safety and attempting to alert a crew member in the bunk below him — but he said his pleas for help went unanswered.The sailor from the lower bunk testified Friday that he remembered the alleged victim attempting to wake him up on the morning in question.The bunkmate said the two men then reported the incident to a superior.Boutin said Saturday that if the alleged victim had wanted to withdraw consent, he should have communicated that to Cooper, not his bunkmate.Boutin reminded the military judge that the prosecution bears the burden of proving the sexual-assault charge beyond a reasonable doubt, and said if Sukstorf had reason to believe that the alleged conversation near the locker occurred, she should find Cooper not guilty.Martin said if she decided the alleged victim was unconscious when the sexual activity began, she would have to rule the other way.Military Judge Cmdr. Sandra Sukstorf said she expected to reach a verdict by Monday afternoon.last_img read more

17Oct/19

Toronto urged to take action after string of pedestrian and cyclist deaths

first_imgTORONTO – Advocates, politicians and members of the public are demanding Toronto make its streets safer for cyclists and pedestrians after a string of recent deaths highlighted just how dangerous the city’s roads can be.Two cyclists and a pedestrian were hit and killed by vehicles in three separate incidents in just the past week, bringing the city’s total number of such fatalities this year to three cyclists and 17 pedestrians, according to Toronto police.Those figures were up from two cyclist deaths and 12 pedestrian fatalities by this point last year. In 2016, by June, there had been 21 pedestrian deaths and no cyclist deaths.For 29-year-old cyclist Connor Gregory, who said he has been struck by a vehicle three times on his bike and has had three more collisions with car doors, the fear of a fatal brush with motor traffic weighs on him every time he hits the road.“On an almost daily basis, there are situations that are fairly dangerous,” he said.“With the news last week, a lot of people were expressing just sort of being fed up with the lack of response that there’s been to road safety.”Advocacy groups like Cycle Toronto, meanwhile, have said the recent deaths have highlighted the need for the city to take action.Toronto’s mayor said he’s been horrified by the recent deaths and pledged an additional $13 million Friday to the city’s Vision Zero road safety plan, a five-year project adopted in 2016 that aims to reduce traffic-related deaths and serious injuries. The funds would bring total investment in the project to $100 million, his office said.“Any death on Toronto streets is absolutely unacceptable, no one should lose their lives in this way,” John Tory said. “The deaths of pedestrians and cyclists on our roads continues to be an issue which has been particularly troubling and, I’ll admit, very frustrating to me.”Tory also promised other measures that include enhancing bike lanes along ten cycling corridors and installing zebra markings at up to 200 intersections.But critics say road safety in the city is reaching a crisis point.“It’s just heartbreaking,” Cherise Burda, executive director of Ryerson University’s City Building Institute, said of the recent deaths. “It’s so sad, and it’s so unnecessary. We have the tools to change.”City leaders have dragged their feet or rejected road safety measures outright in the past, often in the name of protecting drivers, she said.“Most of streets are designed for cars, and this worked in the post-war world where we wanted to sprawl and (have) everybody get around in their car, but our streets are incredibly congested now and it’s really hard to get around,” she said.There were 43 pedestrian deaths and one cyclist death recorded in 2016 according to Toronto police. By the end of last year there were 36 pedestrian and four cyclists fatalities, according to police, who track only incidents on public roadways, and define traffic fatalities as ones in which the vehicle involved was moving or “ready to move.”As Toronto continues to grow, it will have to redesign its streets for better mobility, Burda said, noting that the Vision Zero plan needs to be efficiently carried out.“You can’t have a Vision Zero plan and not implement it and say that it’s failing,” said Burda, who uses multiple modes of transport, including bikes, to get around Toronto. “You have to actually implement it. And we’re not doing that.”Toronto has areas where sidewalks have been widened and protected bike lanes have been added, but the overhauled areas are often not connected to each other, making it hard for cyclists or pedestrians to get from one part of the city to another safely, Burda said.On the other hand, Vancouver — where there has been only one cyclist death since the start of 2016, and only four pedestrian deaths so far this year — has committed to continuous bike routes throughout the city.“The evidence shows that when you build the infrastructure, the cyclists come,” said Burda. “Imagine if you had a safe network of segregated bike lanes. So many more people would cycle.”Coun. Mike Layton said Vision Zero’s infrastructure and public education initiatives — which last year included launching school safety zones, upgrading intersections and adding red-light cameras — have moved too slowly, due to a lack of funds granted up-front.“If we’re going to make the streets safer for all road users, something’s got to change our infrastructure and something’s got to change with our attitudes towards other road users,” Layton said.“People are travelling too fast, they are too distracted and that’s leading to the accidents that we are seeing. That on top of our infrastructure (must change). It’s not one or the other. It has to be both.”Like many road safety issues brought to city council, increasing resources for Vision Zero was met with strong opposition he said.Last year’s ultimately successful motion to make permanent the Bloor Street Pilot Project — which saw bike lanes added to a section of the city’s busiest east-west streets — was a particular flash point.“Every inch of paint, every bollard on the road was a fight,” he said. “And it was a fight with fellow councillors. It was pushing the community to look at the change as something that will in fact save people’s lives.”—with files by Adina Bresge.last_img read more

17Oct/19

NB police lay charges in hitandrun death of young Aboriginal man

first_imgSAINT-CHARLES, N.B. – There was relief on a New Brunswick First Nation Wednesday, after police laid charges in a hit-and-run death that left residents grieving and seeking justice.“We’re extremely happy,” said Ruth Levi, a band councillor and director of social services at the Elsipogtog reserve.Brady Francis, a well-liked 22-year-old from Elsipogtog, was struck and killed by a pickup truck after leaving a party on Feb. 24.RCMP charged Maurice Johnson, a 56-year-old man from Saint-Charles, N.B., with failing to stop at the scene of an accident involving bodily harm or death.They said it’s believed Francis was waiting for a drive home when he was struck.Johnson is to appear in Moncton provincial court July 10.“The investigation is over. It was long but it shows that Brady’s case was not put on the back burner which a lot of people though was happening,” Levi said Wednesday.Many Elsipogtog residents had called for criminal charges in the case, and alluded to Aboriginal anger at the jury acquittals in the killings of Colten Boushie and Tina Fontaine on the Prairies.Social media posts were circulating following the incident with pictures of Boushie, Fontaine and Francis side by side, and many were tweeting #justiceforbrady, echoing hashtags used after the recent Prairie verdicts.Said one Twitter user at the time: “All we can do is pray that Canada gets this one right.”But Levi said Wednesday residents now believe the healing can begin.“The RCMP did a great job in their investigation. Many times we thought nothing was happening because it was so long, a hundred and some-odd days, but today is a good day with lots of emotion,” she said.She said although Francis was young, he was well respected in the community.“This past weekend there was a Brady memorial volleyball tournament. We had a big thing on his birthday on April 21. They had a dart tournament. So Brady is always on our mind, day in and day out. We lost a great man.”Levi said he was always smiling, never in trouble, and planning to go to school to get a trade this fall.last_img read more

17Oct/19

Spin yarn unspun Research upends theory that Vikings taught Inuit fibre skills

first_imgNew research is upending old assumptions about what the ancestors of today’s Inuit learned from Viking settlers.And the techniques researchers have developed to show that ancient Dorset and Thule people knew how to spin yarn centuries before the Norse were thought to have taught them could change the way archeologists think about Arctic history.“There’s a lot we don’t know,” said Michele Hayeur Smith of Brown University in Rhode Island and lead author of a recent paper in the Journal of Archaeological Science.Hayeur Smith and her colleagues were looking at scraps of yarn, perhaps used to hang amulets or decorate clothing, from ancient sites on Baffin Island and the Ungava Peninsula.The origin of the yarn spun from animal hair and sinew had bedevilled Arctic scientists for generations. Most assumed it was a skill picked up from Viking colonists who sailed west from Greenland, establishing a community at L’Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland about 1,000 years ago.Hayeur Smith, who specializes in the study of ancient textiles, had her doubts.First, the yarn didn’t look like anything she’d seen in years of examining Norse fibres. Second, why would the people of the Arctic — highly skilled clothes-makers — need to learn such a basic technique from anyone else?“The idea that you would have to learn to spin something from another culture was a bit ludicrous,” she said. “It’s a pretty intuitive thing to do.”The problem was the yarn was hard to date. The pieces were full of oil from whales and seals, and anything impregnated with oil from sea mammals has been almost impossible to carbon date.Until now.Co-author Gorill Nilsen at Tromso University in Norway came up with a way to “shampoo” the oil out of the fibres without damaging them. Some fibres from a site on Baffin’s southern coast were then subjected to the latest carbon-dating methods.The results were jaw-dropping, said co-author Kevin Smith of Brown University.“They clustered into a period from about 100 AD to about 600-800 AD — roughly 1,000 years to 500 years before the Vikings ever showed up. (The Dorset) are manipulating the kinds of fibres you find in your environment at least as early as 100 BC.”In fact, the Vikings may have picked up a few tricks from the Thule. It’s not conclusive, but Hayeur Smith said there’s some evidence to suggest Norse weavers learned how to use hair from bears and foxes, as well as from sheep and goats, from the people they referred to as Skraelings.The shampoo technique pioneered on yarn may have huge implications for all Arctic archaeology. Sea mammal oil was everywhere in ancient campsites, which reduces the reliability of standard dating methods. And dating is everything in archeology.“There’s a lot of questions like that in the Arctic — getting the subtleties of when people moved in to certain areas,” Smith said. “How did they move? What are the migration patterns?” she said“Until we get good dating methods we can’t even begin to deal with that.”The study also underlines the importance of studying textiles, in addition to the traditional focus on stone tools and hunting, said Hayeur Smith.“People don’t spend a lot time thinking about this as a valid form of material culture that is representing something else,” she said.“Covering yourself, protecting yourself, is equally as important as eating.”— Follow Bob Weber on Twitter at @row1960last_img read more

17Oct/19

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to visit Canada next weekend April 2728

first_imgOTTAWA — Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will meet with his Japanese counterpart, Shinzo Abe, when the latter visits Canada next weekend.Abe and Trudeau’s two-day meeting on April 27 and 28 will centre on the upcoming G20 summit in Osaka in late June, as well strengthening ties between the two countries.Trudeau’s office says in a statement the two will also discuss the revamped Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, which the PMO says has created opportunities in both countries.The Canadian and Japanese leaders are expected to address the media after holding their bilateral meeting.The pair most recently spoke at the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation leaders’ meeting in Papua, New Guinea, last November.Abe’s upcoming visit to Canada is part of a week-long trip to Europe and North America that includes stops in the United States, France, Italy, Slovakia and Belgium, as Japan prepares to play host to the G20.The Canadian Presslast_img read more

16Oct/19

Chili Peppers Chad Smith To Lobby Congress On Importance Of Music Education

first_imgOn March 19 and 20, artists Chad Smith of the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Bernie Williams, former NY Yankee and Latin Grammy-nominated jazz guitarist join leaders of the music instrument and products industry in Washington, D.C. to lobby Congress on the importance of comprehensive music education in our nation’s schools.Chad Smith of the Red Hot Chili Peppers (photographed here) and Other Renowned Artists Join Music Industry’s DC Fly-In to Advocate for Music Education.Credit/Copyright: PRNewsFoto/The National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM), Photo Credit: Laura GlassThe National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) organizes the annual Advocacy Fly-In on behalf of school music education programs in public schools, to promote the benefits that playing music can have for children and teens, and to assure that federal education policy and funding advance access to music learning for all children.Smith, long known for his music-education advocacy efforts adds his voice to NAMM’s Advocacy Fly-In and efforts to support music in America’s schools. “I am a perfect example of someone who’s been musically educated exclusively throughout grade school, middle school and high school by the public school system,” the GRAMMY-winning drummer said. “If there hadn’t been a music program in my public schools, I would not be where I am today. Every kid – and I mean everyone – needs a chance to learn and grow with music.” Smith also works with the Percussion Marketing Council’s (PMC) “Percussion In The Schools” program, The Boys Club of Milwaukee, The Collective School of Music, Harlem NYC Jazz, Fender Music Foundation, Little Kids Rock and as an ambassador for Music Drives Us.Pressure on funding for school music programs continue as many districts struggle with budgets and regulations that force schools to narrow their scholastic offerings at the expense of important core academic subjects, music and arts education.The issue of music education in schools is also close to the heart of longtime music-education advocate and gifted jazz guitarist Williams, who attended previous NAMM Advocacy Fly-in and has taken up the cause as a national advocate for music education. “As a student, music was available to me in my public school in Puerto Rico. It fostered discipline in me, and the ability to perform under pressure,” he said. “A lot of what music taught me led to my success in other areas – including professional baseball. Music has a profound effect on kids, and education must include music and the arts.”According to a Harris Poll, school principals report higher graduation rates in schools with robust music and art programs than do those without programs (90.2% as compared to 72.9%). In addition, those that rate their programs as “excellent” or “very good” have an even higher graduation rate (90.9%). Schools that have music programs have significantly higher attendance rates than do those without programs (93.3% as compared to 84.9%).Nearly 30 NAMM Members, executive committee and industry representatives will join Smith, Williams and NAMM president and CEO Joe Lamond for this year’s DC Fly-In March 18-20. “NAMM Members envision a world in which every child has a deep desire to learn music and a recognized right to be taught; and in which every adult is a passionate champion and defender of that right,” Lamond said. “Our work in Washington seeks to further that aim.”NAMM’s annual Advocacy Fly-In gives NAMM Members the opportunity to advocate to their Members of Congress for policy and funding to support music and arts education. This advocacy effort includes one day of preparation at the Kennedy Center and another day of personal meetings with representatives and other influencers. Sessions are preceded by an issues briefing and training, after which NAMM Members hit the halls of the U.S. Capitol and Congressional office buildings to lobby their representatives about the importance of music education and needed changes to assure access for music learning. During the trip NAMM Members are also trained on developing state-level advocacy efforts for music and arts education that they can take back to their communities in time for school budget season.last_img read more

16Oct/19

Stephen Curry Drives Three for Three Challenge For Nothing But Nets

first_imgGolden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry will once again lead his Three for Three Challenge for the 2014-15 season by donating three life-saving bednets to the United Nations Foundation’s Nothing But Nets campaign for every three-pointer he makes this season.The Warriors have also announced that the team will match Curry’s donation throughout the 2014-15 season up to $5,000.During his first two seasons running the challenge (2012-13 & 2013-14), Curry donated 1,599 bednets to help thousands of families avoid malaria infection. During the 2012-13 season, Curry established a new NBA single-season three-point record with 272 three-pointers made and donated 816 bednets, and last season (2013-14), Curry recorded 261 three-pointers, providing 783 bednets to families.“I am honored to support the Nothing But Nets campaign for the third season in a row to continue to help raise awareness and provide bednets to protect families from malaria,” said Curry. “This has been an issue close to my heart since my days at Davidson, and I am grateful that the Warriors organization is helping me once again this season to give to such an important cause.”Since his time as a college star at Davidson when his college roommate, Bryant Barr, educated him and encouraged him to get involved in the cause, Curry has been a committed champion of the United Nations Foundation’s Nothing But Nets campaign, which works with the UN and other partners to distribute insecticide-treated mosquito nets to protect families across sub-Saharan Africa from malaria. Every 60 seconds, a child dies from malaria. Malaria kills more than 600,000 people worldwide every year, most of them children under five. Bednets provide a simple, cost-effective solution. It only costs $10 to purchase and deliver a bednet, and provide education on its proper use. Since 2006, Nothing But Nets has delivered millions of life-saving bednets to protect families in need thanks to the generous contributions from its partners, champions, and supporters.“Last year, Stephen traveled with us to Tanzania and saw first-hand how malaria can devastate families,” said Chris Helfrich, Director of the Nothing But Nets campaign. “We are so grateful that he and the Golden State Warriors have inspired thousands of fans to get involved in the fight to defeat malaria.”Fans can get involved to help Curry and the Golden State Warriors in the fight against malaria. Go to www.NothingButNets.net to send a net and help save a life.last_img read more

16Oct/19

Womens Entrepreneurship A No Ceilings Conversation with Chelsea Clinton

first_imgOn Monday, April 6, Clinton Foundation Vice Chair Chelsea Clinton will join Jack Dorsey, CEO of Square, the Chairman of Twitter, and a founder of both, to host Women’s Entrepreneurship: A No Ceilings Conversation at Spelman College.They will be joined by Beverly Daniel Tatum, President of Spelman College, Tina Wells, CEO of Buzz Marketing, Cherita Kempson, Co-Founder of Endulge Cupcakes, Spelman students and local business owners to discuss what works in women’s entrepreneurship.New data recently released by No Ceilings finds that critical barriers to women’s full economic participation remain — both in the United States and abroad. Monday’s event will highlight the ways in which new technologies are empowering small businesses and aspiring entrepreneurs. It will also discuss how young women in STEM can excel through programs like College Code Camp — a five-day immersion program that brings together women engineering students to build a stronger community around women in technology.Women’s Entrepreneurship: A No Ceilings Conversation is the continuation in a series of live and virtual discussions designed to hear directly from women and girls, as well as men and boys, about how to support and expand opportunities for all. This conversation follows the release of the No Ceilings Full Participation Report on March 9, which analyzes data from more than 190 countries on the gains made for women and girls over the last twenty years, and the gaps that still remain, as well as the No Ceilings Full Participation Plan, which provides a roadmap to close gaps in full participation.WHATWomen’s Entrepreneurship: A No Ceilings ConversationWHOChelsea Clinton, Vice Chair, Clinton FoundationJack Dorsey, CEO of Square, the Chairman of Twitter, and a founder of bothBeverly Daniel Tatum, President of Spelman CollegeTina Wells, CEO, Buzz MarketingCherita Kempson, Co-Founder, Endulge CupcakesWHENMonday, April 6, 20154:30 PM ETWHERESpelman College, Science Center Auditorium350 Spelman Ln SWAtlanta, GA 30314last_img read more

16Oct/19

Stars To Attend 2016 Los Angeles Police Memorial Foundation Celebrity Poker Tournament

first_imgThe Los Angeles Police Memorial Foundation Celebrity Poker Tournament will take place this weekend.Los Angeles Police Memorial Foundation Celebrity Poker Tournament Proceeds from this event benefit LAPD employees and their immediate family members, who have experienced unforeseen catastrophic circumstances, including death, illness and injury. The Memorial Foundation is the cornerstone of the Los Angeles Police Departments employee wellness program and has granted over $16 million without any direct taxpayer money.The evening will include red carpet arrivals, a celebrity poker tournament, casino games, great food, cocktails, music, photobooth, raffles and auctions. Along with dozens of unique and priceless items in the auction, guests will have the chance to win a 2-seater ride with the legendary IndyCar champion Mario Andretti at the 2017 Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach with tickets, pit passes and stay at Renaissance Long Beach, spend the day with MMA fighter Tito Ortiz in training & tickets to BellatorMMA Ortiz vs. Sonnen Fight at the Forum, a stay at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino, tour of Jay Leno’s private auto/motorcycle collection, LAPD airship ride, LAPD SWAT Training Day, Training at the Emergency Vehicle Operation Center to learn pursuit & pit maneuvers etc.Hosted by Don Cheadle, celebrity guests are expected to include Christopher Meloni, Danny Masterson, Luke Wilson, Jerry West, Peter Facinelli, Tito Ortiz, Jerry Cantrell, Billy Burke, Andre Reed, Gilles Marini, Camryn Manheim, Lou Diamond Phillips, AJ Buckley, Christopher Judge, Keearan Geovanni, Keesha Sharp, Golnesa “GG” Gharachedaghi, Jason Collins, Jayde Nicole, Michael Paul Chan, Shanna Moakler, Tia Carrera, Tony Denison, and Vanessa Marcil.Saturday, November 19thLos Angeles Police Memorial Foundation Celebrity Poker Tournament & Casino Night PartyRed Carpet: 5pmPoker Begins: 6pmAvalon Hollywood: 1735 Vine St.last_img read more

16Oct/19

Kiehls Since 1851 Embarks On LifeRide For Breast Cancer

first_imgMaintaining its mission of philanthropy, Kiehl’s Since 1851, the venerable New York-based purveyor of fine quality skin and hair care, returns to Washington DC with an expansion of its charitable motorcycle ride, LifeRide.Kiehl’s LifeRide for Breast Cancer, Benefitting The Brem Foundation will take place over three days, Oct. 23-Oct. 25, riding from Richmond, VA to Washington DC, and around the metro DMV area.This is a new version of Kiehl’s cross-country motorcycle ride inspired by Kiehl’s iconic motorcycle, spirit of adventure, and philanthropic heritage, and will benefit Washington DC’s The Brem Foundation, which helps women find breast cancer early, when they have the best chance for survival. The Brem Foundation educates women about their risk factors and screening options, provides access to diagnostic tests for uninsured women, and funds the only breast-imaging training program that requires community service.The ride will specifically support the foundation’s B-Fund, paying for women to get critical diagnostic tests when they can’t afford those tests. The fund pays for those diagnostic tests within two weeks of a woman’s abnormal screening mammogram, maximizing their chances of finding an early, curable breast cancer.“For Kiehl’s, LifeRide is about making noise about a cause that we passionately believe in, about physically going out into our community and reaching our customers face to face,” said Chris Salgardo, President, Kiehl’s USA, and a motorcycle enthusiast since he was a teenager. “We’re proud to return to DC to make more noise for Breast Cancer because the latest CDC data says that DC still has the highest death rate from breast cancer than any other state in the US. If we can help move those numbers in any way, we will do so.”Kiehl’s President Chris Salgardo will lead the motorcycle riders, including actors Katee Sackhoff, Gilles Marini, and HGTV’s Anthony Carrino, from Richmond, VA to Washington DC, making stops to meet customers, raise awareness for The Brem Foundation, and invite the public to contribute to efforts that provide all women with access to life-saving services. The riders will educate customers with the help of Dr. Rachel Brem, the organization’s Chief Medical Advisor and Andrea Wolf, its President and CEO.“The Brem Foundation could not be more excited to partner with Kiehl’s,” Wolf said. “Together we will use the LifeRide to pave a path to a world where early-detection prevails and far fewer women die from breast cancer.”The ride concludes with a finale at Kiehl’s in Georgetown, and the official announcement of Kiehl’s donation of $10,000 to The Brem Foundation.Kiehl’s LifeRide for Breast Cancer, Benefitting The Brem Foundation is just one of Kiehl’s efforts for Breast Cancer this year. The company also has a national partnership with Bright Pink, a national non-profit focused on the prevention and early detection of breast and ovarian cancer in young women, on a limited-edition product to benefit the organization and raise awareness for breast health education.JOIN THE RIDE!The public is invited to join the festivities at the following stops: • MONDAY, OCT. 23, 2017 ◦ Kiehl’s at Dillard’s Short Pump Town Center, 11824 W. Broad St., Richmond, VA, 12:00-1:00 PM • TUESDAY, OCT. 24, 2017 ◦ Kiehl’s at Bloomingdale’s at The Shops at Wisconsin Place, 5300 Western Ave., Chevy Chase, MD, 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM ◦ Kiehl’s Since 1851, Tysons Corner Center, 1961 Chain Bridge Rd., McLean, VA, 1:00-2:00 PM • WEDNESDAY, OCT. 25, 2017 ◦ Kiehl’s Since 1851, 3110 M St., Washington DC, 1:00 PM–2:00 PMKiehl’s customers nationwide can also raise funds and awareness for Breast Cancer prevention and early detection throughout October. • Post a photo blowing a kiss, and tag @Kiehls and hashtag #KISSFORTHECURE. Kiehl’s will donate $1 for every post, up to $35,000, to The Brem Foundation and Bright Pink. • Limited Edition #KissForTheCure Butterstick Lip Duo: 100% of purchase price from the sale of this product, up to $25,000, will benefit Bright Pink, a national non-profit focused on the prevention and early detection of breast and ovarian cancer in young women. $32. • Donate in-store. All Kiehl’s retail stores nationwide will be accepting donations for The Brem Foundation and Bright Pink. To find your closest store, please visit the store locator on Kiehls.com.To find out more about LifeRide and Kiehl’s projects to support women’s health, click here.last_img read more

15Oct/19

Calgary Operas Chautauqua Tent productions brim with humour high spirits

first_imgAdvertisement Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebookcenter_img Login/Register With: Twitter After three years of presenting full-scale operetta/musical productions under a large tent in the East Village, Calgary Opera is taking a break. This year, instead of a fully professional production with orchestra, Calgary Opera is presenting a variety of modest-sized, semi-professional entertainments, all under the conceptual title of The Chautauqua Tent. The term itself is now largely unused today, but in the past Chautauqua Tent referred not only to a traveling tent show but to the idea of culturally elevating summer entertainment, especially in the culturally starved prairies of yore.  Indeed, the Chautauqua movement, as it might be called, had its Canadian roots in Calgary, which was the centre of this movement for many years, lasting to the interwar period.In the manner in which the term is used by Calgary Opera this summer, it involves two 45-minutes operas: a much shortened version of Humperdinck’s  Hansel and Gretel, and an operatic spoof on the Archie comic entitled Archibaldo, the latter performed by Cowtown Opera.  In between the afternoon and evening performances there are a variety of other acts, ranging from Broadway songs, to opera arias, to music for brass quintet.  Altogether, especially with the weather now co-operating, it made for an enjoyable way to spend a summer afternoon.last_img read more

15Oct/19

Expanding horizons and engaging audiences at Montreals doc festival

first_img Facebook Advertisement Advertisement “People have to feel they’re expanding their horizons,” Gourd-Mercado says of the spirit that guides RIDM. “Otherwise they can just watch Netflix.”RIDM was founded in 1998 by a group of documentary filmmakers, whose early gatherings had a definite entre-nous quality. The event is still well-attended by those in the business, but Gourd-Mercado, who worked for years as a film publicist before taking over the festival in 2014, is continuing a recent effort to raise the festival’s profile in the community. In the past five years, RIDM’s audience has doubled to around 63,000, she says, including those who watch its offerings outdoors, or in jail. ‘Our trademark is what we call creative documentary,” says Mara Gourd-Mercado, executive director of the Montreal International Documentary Festival (RIDM). To get an idea of what she means, consider El Futuro Perfecto (The Future Perfect), a film from Mara’s native Argentina, which is among 128 entries selected for this year’s festival.The film focuses on a young Chinese immigrant named Xiaobin Zhang, whom filmmaker Nele Wohlatz met in a Spanish language class in Buenos Aires. Wohlatz, who had immigrated as an adult from Germany, befriended Zhang and talked with her about a film based on her efforts to fit into Argentinian society and resist her family’s traditional expectations. The two worked out a scenario and scenes, and Wohlatz and Pio Longo wrote dialogue in the style of the flat practice exchanges in Zhang’s language textbook. Wohlatz also shot several alternate endings for the story, based on Zhang’s suggestions. In method and feeling, there’s a lot about El Futuro Perfecto that resembles a feature film. We’re not shown footage of real-life situations, but scripted simulations, some of which feel comically stiff and unrealistic. The film is a comedy about the two-dimensional zone one enters when first learning a new language and culture. But it’s also about the complex emotions that such dislocations can provoke and all of it is tethered more or less closely to Zhang’s experience.Or consider Pierre-Yves Vendeweerd’s poetic Les tourmentes, one of seven films by this Belgian cineaste in an RIDM retrospective. Vandeweerd’s subject seems to be existential malaise in a bleak northern environment, exhibited via brooding shots of people immobilized in their houses, clinging to large rocks or shearing sheep. A female voice-over murmurs a text that is both descriptive and prophetic. There’s no story and no main characters, unless the story is the human condition as borne by a nameless community. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

15Oct/19

WHATS THE VALUE OF A MASTER RECORDING BUFFY SAINTEMARIE AND OTHERS WEIGH

first_imgAdvertisement Login/Register With: “It’s the cherry on the cake of (crap), that fire is,” Sainte-Marie added using an expletive.A decade after the fire, Sainte-Marie had no idea Universal believed original copies of her work might’ve perished in the flames. Nobody from the label contacted her, she said, and an extensive report published last month in the New York Times was the first she’d heard of it.“The music business is not about the music, it’s about the business, so I’m not at all surprised that whoever is responsible at Universal tried to hush it up,” she added.Sainte-Marie said original copies of three albums she made under ABC Records and MCA Records in the mid-1970s are probably gone.She doesn’t let it get to her though, partly because she’s turned much of her attention away from the music industry and towards social activism, philanthropy and her latest work with the Creative Native Project, a mentorship program that links established artists with Indigenous youth looking to gain knowledge.She feels worse for other artists who believe their tapes were among the 100,000 masters engulfed in the flames. Canadians Bryan Adams and Sum 41 lead singer Deryck Whibley have said they believe some of their work was destroyed.Universal says the Times “overstated” the losses in their report, but the label’s CEO pledged “transparency”‘ and “answers” for the artists on the status of their master recordings.Negative experiences with music executives framed Sainte-Marie’s career in the 1960s. The budding young performer got a crash course in the lack of control most musicians have over their work when she famously sold the rights for her 1964 song “Universal Soldier” to another music industry player for $1 in a contract written on a napkin. The single went on to be recorded by country act the Highwaymen and British pop singer Donovan.It took Sainte-Marie a decade before she could repurchase ownership of the song for $25,000.“I never gave away my publishing again,” she said. “Eventually I started insisting that I own the masters, which was unheard of.”Sainte-Marie began stowing her masters away in a safe place, but she acknowledges not every artist has that power.A few weeks ago, Taylor Swift drew attention to her own master recordings when she launched a public battle over their ownership. Under a contract she signed as a teenager, masters for her first six albums are owned by Big Machine Records, which is in the midst of being sold to a company owned by Justin Bieber’s manager Scooter Braun.Swift objected to her masters landing in Braun’s hands for several reasons, including that he’d posses control over how they’re used.While a label owning an artist’s master recordings is common, Swift’s battle and the fallout of the Universal fire emphasize how little power most artists have over their original recordings or where they’re stored. Owning physical copies of master tapes was even more difficult in the pre-digital era.Our Lady Peace frontman Raine Maida said masters of the band’s first two albums from the 1990s sit in the hands of Sony Music Canada.“Back in the days of tape you had no backup so the label made sure to get them — it was actually a delivery requirement,” he said.“Now only the highly organized are able to locate master files easily.”Once digital recordings became commonplace around the turn of the millennium, Maida said he made sure to get ahold of duplicates to store himself.Daniel Greaves, lead singer of the Watchmen, said he was shocked when the Winnipeg-founded band’s name showed up on the Universal list, particularly because he has no idea what might’ve been in the U.S. label’s vaults. He said most of their albums were mastered in Canada.“They’re supposed to keep that stuff safe and secure,” Greaves said.“It’s pretty nefarious, but at the same time do any of us expect anything different from the record companies?”Like many artists trying to manage busy touring schedules, the Watchmen didn’t keep a close tab on some of their earlier masters. Greaves remembers when an employee at Wisconsin recording space Smart Studios called the band because they’d discovered some of their recordings while emptying the building for its closure.“They would keep a copy, or something like that, I’m not even entirely sure,” Greaves said. “But I do remember having them reach out to us saying, ‘We’re closing… where should we send this stuff?’ which is the way it should work, in terms of people who are holding on to your intellectual property.”Bob Doidge, owner of Hamilton’s Grant Avenue Studio, believes musicians need to take greater responsibility for their original masters. Over the decades, his space hosted the likes of Johnny Cash, Gordon Lightfoot and U2, but among the hundreds of others who recorded there, surprisingly few gave much thought to their masters.“I’ve tried desperately to get people to come and pick up their tapes because I have a basement full — so many you couldn’t imagine,” he said.At most studios, Doidge said original masters wind up collecting dust on a shelf for a decade or more, until they’re tossed into a dumpster.With Lightfoot’s work, Doidge takes extra care by carrying a duplicate of the original master home with him every night. It’s a practice he embraced years before a 2018 blaze burned through several homes on the block, narrowly missing Grant Avenue Studios, and one he’s using for Lightfoot’s upcoming album.He encourages musicians to consider taking home a duplicate of their master recordings, too.“Treat it as precious,” he tells clients.“It’s not like we spent the afternoon blowin’ up some tunes and here it is. A Gordon Lightfoot record takes a year… These songs are precious to humanity, that’s really what it comes down to.”Sainte-Marie tries to frame the possible loss of her masters in the bigger picture.“I have a saying that has comforted me many times in my life: ‘It’s only music and music is replicable,’” she said.“Maybe a certain recording was absolutely wonderful. This is today and tomorrow is going to happen; let’s just keep on keeping on, make some more great music.”By David Friend ~ The Canadian Press Buffy Sainte-Marie performs at the Americana Music Honors and Awards show Wednesday, Sept. 16, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. Buffy Sainte-Marie was frustrated when she saw her name among hundreds of musicians whose master tapes might’ve burned in the 2008 fire on Universal’s Los Angeles backlot. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Mark Zaleski Twitter LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment center_img Advertisement Advertisement TORONTO — Buffy Sainte-Marie was frustrated when she saw her name among hundreds of musicians whose master tapes may have burned in the 2008 fire on Universal Studios’ Los Angeles backlot.She wasn’t so concerned about her own work, but dismayed by the loss of original recordings from other legendary musicians, many who died years ago. It reminded her of how little the music industry respects the cultural contributions of its performers. Facebooklast_img read more

15Oct/19

NICKELODEON UNVEILS FIRST LOOK AT ARE YOU AFRAID OF THE DARK REBOOT

first_img Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Nickelodeon’s “Are You Afraid of the Dark?” brought a scary good time to an entire generation of kids back in the 1990s, and the network is getting ready to unleash a new version of the show for today’s children.A new trailer indicates the upcoming reboot may be darker and scarier than the original, featuring a new crew of kids sitting around a campfire sharing new stories for the approval of the Midnight Society. Advertisement The three-episode miniseries will follow “an entirely new Midnight Society group of kids who tell a terrifying tale about the Carnival of Doom, only to have the events of the story come to life,” reads the synopsis for the upcoming show, which has yet to announce a premiere date. Facebook Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

14Oct/19

Medallion commemorating Metis unveiled

first_imgAPTN National NewsThis year has been designated the year of the Metis.It also marks that 125th anniversary of the death of Louis Riel.In Winnipeg, Indian Affairs Minister John Duncan was on hand to unveil a special medallion for the celebration.It commemorates the contributions Metis people have made to the creation of Manitoba and the development of Western Canada.The first to receive the medallion were Metis dignitaries and veterans.last_img

14Oct/19

Pictou Aquash trial begins in South Dakota

first_imgAPTN National NewsThe trial of the man U.S. authorities believed killed Annie Mae Pictou Aquash has begun in Rapid City, SD.John Graham, a former American Indian Movement member, is charged with her murdered.APTN National News spoke with Heidi Bell Gease, a newspaper reporter with the Rapid City Journal who has been covering the trial.last_img

14Oct/19

Winnipeg to get 24hour centre for youth at risk … but for

first_imgAPTN National NewsAfter years of lobbying, the city of Winnipeg will soon have a 24-hour safe haven for youth at risk of being exploited.Until now, drop-in centres for young people have shut their doors at 11 p.m.The province and city have now put up hundreds of thousands of dollars to expand hours.But as APTN’s Dennis Ward reports the money will only cover one year of operation.last_img

14Oct/19

Internationally renowned Mohawk artist bringing new act to Montreal

first_imgAPTN National NewsInternationally renowned as an artist and choreographer, Santee Smith is a Mohawk woman from Six Nations in Ontario.Smith is also the founding artistic director of Kaha:wi Dance Theatre.For the first time, she will be presenting her new dance performance in Montreal from Nov. 6-8 at the Montreal Art Intercultural.APTN’s Danielle Rochette had the story.last_img

14Oct/19

Nunavut minister faces media for first time in territory since Rankin Inlet

first_imgAPTN National NewsFor much of December 2014, Nunavut MP Leona Aglukkaq was forced to explain herself.It started when an APTN Investigates episode showed residents of Rankin Inlet, NU foraging in the local dump for food.Following that broadcast, the minister was heard heckling opposition members on the issue in the house of commons, is alleged to have asked for an apology from the town’s deputy mayor for raising the subject, and nonchalantly reading a newspaper in the house while the debate on high food prices in the north raged around her.Today in Iqaluit, Aglukkaq surfaced to meet the media and begin 2015 where 2014 left off.APTN’s Kent Driscoll reports.last_img read more