Rape victim shot dead by accused in Gurugram

first_imgA 23-year-old woman working at a Hauz Khas bar was shot dead in Gurugram on Friday allegedly by the man she had accused of rape.A teenage friend of the victim who was a witness to the murder said the accused, Sandeep, shot the woman after she refused to withdraw the rape case against him.According to the FIR, Sandeep called the woman in the early hours of Friday and asked her to meet him. The woman, along with the friend, reached her room in DLF Phase-III where Sandeep arrived with his friend and the four went out for food around 2 a.m.When they returned around 5:30 a.m., Sandeep asked the woman’s mother and sister, who were visiting her, to persuade her to withdraw the rape case against him. The victim refused following which the four left the room and drove towards Faridabad. When they reached Khushboo Chowk around 6.30 a.m., Sandeep stopped the car and pulled the woman out. He threatened to shoot her if she did not withdraw the case.When she refused again, Sandeep whipped out a revolver and allegedly opened fire at her. The woman’s friend fled the spot and informed the victim’s mother about the incident. The mother reported the matter to the police. Gurugram Police spokesperson Subhash Boken said the woman was shot about five times. No arrests have been made so far.The victim belonged to Karnal while her friend is from Bhiwani. The police said the woman had come in contact with Sandeep, a bouncer, when she came to Gurugram four years ago. The two fell for each other and moved in together. After two years of live-in relationship, the woman learnt that Sandeep was married and lodged a rape case against him in November 2017. Sandeep was arrested and let off on bail in June last year. A month later, the two started living together again, the police said.last_img read more

Fossil Whale Offers Clues to Origins of ‘Seeing With Sound’

first_imgWhen you’re trying to track a fish in the murky ocean, forget about using your eyes—use your ears. Dolphins, orcas, and other toothed whales—known as odontocetes—pinpoint their prey by producing high-frequency sounds that bounce around their marine environment and reveal exactly where tricky fish are trying to hide. But when did whales evolve this sonarlike ability, known as echolocation? A newly named, 28-million-year-old whale may hold the answer.Found in South Carolina among rocks dating back to the Oligocene epoch and christened Cotylocara macei, the fossil whale is named after Mace Brown, a curator at the College of Charleston’s Mace Brown Natural History Museum in South Carolina who acquired the specimen for his private collection about a decade ago. It was in that private accumulation of fossils that Jonathan Geisler, a paleontologist at the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine in Old Westbury, first saw the skull. “I knew it was special then,” he says.The only known specimen of the early odontocete includes a nearly complete skull and jaw, three neck vertebrae, and fragments of seven ribs. It’s the skull that makes Cotylocara so remarkable. While the whale’s soft tissue rotted away long ago, the skull bones show several features—such as a downturned snout and a slight asymmetry of the skull—that suggest Cotylocara was one of the earliest whales to use echolocation, Geisler’s team reports online today in Nature.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The strongest pieces of evidence for this hypothesis, Geisler explains, are cavities at the base of the snout and on top of the skull that probably held air sinuses. “These air sinuses are thought to have important roles in the production of high-frequency vocalizations that living odontocetes use for echolocation,” Geisler says, possibly helping direct returning sound waves or store air that can be used to make continuous sound.“I think the authors have a good case for inferring that Cotylocara had some ability to produce some sound from its forehead, just as living toothed whales do today,” says Nicholas Pyenson, a marine mammal paleontologist at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C. But even if Cotylocara made those sounds, could it have heard them? Living whales have specialized ear bones that let them hear the high-frequency sounds bouncing off their prey. The only known skull of Cotylocara doesn’t have well-preserved ear bones, and, therefore, knowing whether the whale could have actually used echolocation for hunting is unclear. “Overall, the description of Cotylocara underscores the need to investigate the inner ear of fossil Oligocene cetaceans in much more detail, because that’s where the answer will be,” Pyenson says. Nevertheless, the whale’s probable sound-producing abilities give Cotylocara an important place in whale evolution. Whale’s biological sonar is thought to have evolved only once along the ancestral line leading to today’s toothed whales, Geisler notes. Cotylocara lies along that evolutionary stem, as do other Oligocene fossil whales that have already been found. The skull features that allowed Cotylocara to create sound, Geisler says, “can now be investigated in other fossil whales to more fully understand the evolution of echolocation.” For now, the evolutionary epic of whale echolocation is only just beginning to be heard.last_img read more

Slideshow: Grad Student Turns Scientific Meeting Into a Cartoon

first_img For Alex Cagan, 140 characters were just not enough. At the Biology of Genomes meeting last week in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, the graduate student from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, contributed 54 cartoons to the Twittersphere. Over the course of each 20-minute talk, he drew a caricature of the speaker and then graphically conveyed the gist of the presentation with a few choice phrases and sometimes a diagram.Son of a set designer who worked in the London theaters, Cagan grew up drawing and was even an art and art history major in college before becoming interested in biology. He spends 2 evenings a week on his art. “I try not to get stagnant,” he says. But he applies his hand in the lab as well, sketching the rats he’s breeding to be tame or aggressive to understand the genetic basis of domestication. He has a lab notebook filled with the various postures these animals assume during different encounters.This meeting is the third at which he sketched his tweets. He felt that by drawing instead of just writing text, he could contribute something unique on Twitter, and judging from the likes and retweets, he’s slowly gaining a following.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)At meetings, he likes to draw the speaker whenever he’s taking notes, regardless of whether he’s tweeting. “When I try to remember the talk, if I have notes with the actual person, it triggers my memory,” he explains. “When I just have text, it’s harder to remember.”An iPad mini is his medium, and with a free app called Paper by FiftyThree, he can quickly draw and erase with his fingers, or turn on the painting palette and fill in the sketches using the watercolor brush function. “I’m surprised that more people aren’t doing it.”The slideshow above shows a few of his favorite tweets from the meeting. At the University of Chicago, Yoav Gilad studies the link between gene activity, as measured by the amount of messenger RNA, and protein production. He finds that cells can still pro Alex Cagan Alex Cagan Alex Cagan ‹› Short tandem repeats (STRs) are short repetitive stretches of DNA once considered unimportant in the genome, but at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Melissa Gymrek is showing that some STRs influence Stanford University’s Michael Snyder takes personal genomics personally. He regularly monitors the repertoire of microbes in his body as wells as the pattern of chemical modifications to DNA called methylation A long-term study of wild baboons and the microbes found in their feces is revealing that social ties affect the makeup of those bacteria, Duke University’s Jenny Tung reported at the meetin Alex Cagan Slideshow: Grad Student Turns Scientific Meeting Into a Cartooncenter_img Alex Cagan A long-term study of wild baboons and the microbes found in their feces is revealing that social ties affect the makeup of those bacteria, Duke University’s Jenny Tung reported at the meetin Alex Cagan Alex Cagan Alex Cagan By examining the portfolio of active genes in several insect species that feed on poisonous plants, Princeton University’s Peter Andolfatto found that often the same gene mutate Finding the key mutations in tumors is like looking for a needle in a haystack, but Dana Pe’er from Columbia University has a new machine learning computer program to help track down those Stanford University’s Michael Snyder takes personal genomics personally. He regularly monitors the repertoire of microbes in his body as wells as the pattern of chemical modifications to DNA called methylation By Elizabeth PennisiMay. 13, 2014 , 3:30 PMlast_img read more

Honey, I Just Called to Say I Love You

first_imgIt began as a regular day in the life of 32-year-old Vrushali Amin (name changed on request). She woke up early in the morning to get her 4-year-old daughter ready for school. After working through the morning, she settled down for a mid-afternoon break, when the door-bell rang. “It’s not necessary to be with each other physically to love each other for life,” insists Shailee Talati, who courted Prerak Badheka for almost four years before being engaged to him early this year.With child-like innocence and anticipation she ran to the door. When she tore open the envelope that lay in her mail-box, her life was ripped as surely as the envelope she put down.Instead of airline tickets, which she had been awaiting, she had been served divorce papers in the envelope that came from her husband Sudhanshu Modi (name changed).The couple had been married for almost six years before they decided to move to Canada from Ahmedabad, their home town, in search for the dream that beckons hundreds of thousands of Indians overseas every year.The Modi household was in dire financial straits. Modi was administrative assistant at a private company and Amin had given up her job as a pre-school teacher to take care of their young daughter.After Modi secured his visa for Canada, the couple decided he would go ahead to search for employment and settle in the new country, after which Amin and their daughter would join him.The dream of a new and exciting life crashed for Amin and her daughter the day Modi sent those divorce papers.“I was shocked and angry,” recalls Amin. Three years since, the pain of being ditched by the man she “loved more than my life” still stings. Albert Hiron with his sister Bridget at Jaslok Hospital an ultra-modern, centrally located medical facility in Mumbai.Her parents tried to investigate what went wrong, but were unable to get answers from Modi. Amin is past caring. “He is dead for me,” she says with a cold stare. Amin’s experience may be extreme, but couples struggling through long distance relationships (LDR) say they have to work harder to achieve the stability and freshness in their relationship that couples living together achieve just by being physically close.Distance, it is said, makes the heart grow fonder. When two people, deeply in love commit to a life-time of togetherness, distance is not supposed to sever their powerful bond.But does it? Is sometimes out of sight also out of mind? As the world shrinks and people and jobs turn increasingly mobile, more and more couples are discovering themselves living apart.Stephen Blake, author of Loving Your LongDistance Relationship, estimates the number at more than 10 million couples worldwide (of which 2.5 to 3 million are in the United States). Some struggle and emerge out of the separations successfully, while others succumb to the immense pressures of loneliness and call it quits.With careers and financial rewards taking a leap on priority lists of young Indian professionals, love more often than ever before is being trumped by the lures of higher pay, better job opportunities and career advancement.Most couples in committed relationships see a long distance relationship as a temporary phase in their lives for career or financial goals, which in the long run would enhance their family lives. However, sometimes the pressures of separation can destabilize perfectly strong marriages.Just ask Ashutosh Pradhan (name altered), who works as a hotel manager in Pune. “My wife and I decided to shift to different cities due to various demands in our respective careers.”Pradhan’s wife Shimoli Bhatnagar (name altered) worked as a business correspondent with a reputed daily and contemplated a transfer to Pune to keep the family together, but demurred. “I had a promotion due in Bangalore and shifting to Pune would have meant starting from scratch.” It’s been two years and it has proven “brutal,” as Bhatnagar puts it. “I never imagined it would be so tough staying away from Ashutosh and fending for myself with our three year old son alone!”Bhatnagar often feels extremely lonely and insecure. “Ashutosh and I keep fighting about the most insignificant matters on the phone and my insecurity makes him feel I don’t trust him.”For his part, Pradhan feels slighted when Bhatnagar works 14 hours a day, sometimes late into the night, to justify her promotion and stay afloat in the killer journalism market.“I get extremely tired of explaining the most inconsequential things to him at times. I feel is this pain worth it?” complains Shimoli.Pradhan too says he feels “trapped” sometimes and is trying to “come to terms with the situation.” On their anniversary in January this year, when Bhatnagar received a small diamond ring through an internet mall from Pradhan, she was thrilled. “Suddenly, all the happy times came rushing back in my memory and I cried with pain and happiness.”The happiness was short-lived, however. “That same night we had a bitter fight on the phone that ended in tears … again!” she says, sadly.“It’s like a roller-coaster ride of conflicting emotions where one moment you feel safe and the very next moment you feel down again,” sums up Pradhan.Being around other singles can also mean sharing your burdens with the opposite sex. A person juggling a long distance marriage and a high pressure job, may find respite in soothing words from a colleague or a friend.“I sometimes feel the need to pour my heart out to someone and try not to get drawn into any extra marital relationships. It’s so easy to slip and fall,” confides Bhatnagar.“We are trying our best to stay afloat and make this marriage work, though I don’t see much left in our relationship now,” she says with a sigh.In recent years a slew of self help books targeted at couples like Pradhan and Bhatnagar have sought to provide advice, including Long Distance Relationships: The Complete Guide by Gregory Guldner, The Long Distance Romance Guide by Leslie Karsner and The Long Distance Relationship Guide by Caroline Tiger. The Barnes and Noble Press and Media department did not have sale figures for such books, but a representative said overall sales for relationship improvement books has grown drastically over the last two years.“What this means is that couples more than ever before are aware that relationships need to be nurtured and given a lot of time. LDR in particular need a lot of patience from both sides,” says Dr. Jason Tuffmann, practicing psychologist and an expert advisor on relationship issues between couples.He adds, “A LDR after marriage is more dangerous because both partners tend to get used to living around each other and that physical intimacy has already been created. In courtship periods, the couple still hasn’t tasted the bliss of staying under one roof.” On the other hand, the sweet and forgotten feeling of being independent is reawakened when a LDR forces a couple to stay apart after marriage. As Tuffmann puts it, “The most dangerous thing is to realize that you can indeed do without your partner after marriage and get used to living independently and living alone as when you were a single. This is the final blow to any marriage and any relationship.”It’s also tricky to be in a long distance relationship during the courting period. Since this is the time when couples bond emotionally and physically, being together is crucial.Take the case of Ruchika Aggarwal and Sujay Jain (names altered). Aggarwal and Jain were the perfect couple: the gorgeous looking high-school babe and the dashing, rich guy whom girl’s swoon on.They met in the first year of college and after a whirlwind romance, Jain went to Bangalore for advanced studies. After promises of long love letters and the sweetest of reunions, they bid good-bye.Enter Shyamal Khanna (name altered), Jain’s high-school friend. After introducing himself as her boyfriend’s buddy, Khanna endeared himself into Aggarwal’s friend circle and gradually won over her heart.Asked why she broke her promise, Aggarwal responds with well-practiced innocence, “I was too naive to understand what was happening. I couldn’t take the loneliness and needed someone desperately.”Today Aggarwal says she is “nicely settled” in Los Angeles, Calif., with her husband, who she found through well-meaning family friends. But not all such relationships flounder. “It’s not necessary to be with each other physically to love each other for life,” insists Shailee Talati, who courted Prerak Badheka for almost four years before being engaged to him early this year.Talati who is an accounting professional based in Chicago is excited about tying the knot with Badheka, an engineering research fellow based in South Carolina, sometime this year.She discounts the experiences of couples in the courting period who split up because of a lack of physical intimacy: “Not in our case. We trust each other completely and being emotionally close can feel just as wonderful as being physically close.”Cell phones provide some respite to lovers in long distance relationship. As Badheka and Talati say in unison, “We sure did make good use of the unlimited nights and free weekend minutes on our cell phones.”The metamorphosis from friendship to attraction to love occurred long distance for Badheka and Talati and their courtship period was entirely long distance. Badheka says, “We were friends in India and then lost touch for a couple of years. When we got in touch again in the United States, we started out as friends and over a period of four years fell in love and decided to get married.”She adds with a smile, “I have the most precious and perfect relationship with Prerak and we understand and trust each other completely. Yes, the distance is unnerving at times, but never once have we thought of separating because of such a trivial reason.”Indeed, sometimes physically coming together and rekindling some of the lost flame may salvage the relationship from near death.Radhika Mehta and Siddharth Parikh (names altered) were like any other couple in love: moony-eyed and inseparable at parties and social events. After a two year courtship they tied the knot.Just a year into their marriage Parikh moved to North Carolina from San Antonio, Texas, for a better job opportunity.He saw it as an opportunity to build a better future for both of them. However, she saw it as an effort to get away from her, because he had tired of her.As they entered the ruthless world of long distance relationships, they grew more distant from each other, not only physically but also emotionally.This emotional turmoil shook the very foundation of their relationship. Mehta says, “If it were not for that one meeting at the place were we met for the first time, our marriage would have been long over!”They had almost called it quits after endless rounds of bickering and quarrels over the phone.Parikh suggested they meet up, once, for the last time, at the place where he had proposed to Mehta.Two hours after they met at that emotionally significant place, they were in each other’s arms, crying and comforting each other.“We were in love again and it felt as if I was on the top of the world,” says Parikh. “We snatched our victory from the jaws of defeat.”“My LDR taught me the power of emotions and how you can get close to a person who is sitting miles away,” says Tanvi Pota, who recently married Dhwanit Desai, a software professional based in Boston. After their engagement in India, Pota flew to Australia for her MBA studies, while Desai returned to Boston.They started communicating via email and phone. As they had been brought together through an arranged marriage and had been separated immediately thereafter, they had to develop their bond long distance.“It was difficult staying apart when we got emotionally close,” confides Pota about their one and a half year long-distance engagement period.But Desai tells similarly situated couples, “Don’t be disheartened by the pains and frustrations that distance can cause. Follow your heart and if you really love each other and are truly committed-you will make it. Trust me, at the end it’s all worthwhile.”Pota recalls that during their frustrating and lonely times, they often attempted something special to keep the relationship alive. “Dhwanit is my chill pill,” says Pota. So, does it feel different now that they are married and living together? “Predictability has increased now since we are living together and a routine has set in. For a year and a half, we both waited to be together and now that we are, it’s just normal!” she smiles.Ah, the virtues of plain old normal life.   Related Itemslast_img read more

Book review: ‘A Corner of a Foreign field: The Indian History of a British Sport’

first_imgA Corner of a Foreign field: The Indian History of a British Sport By Ramachandra Guha Picador When Aamir Khan turned the story of a fictional cricket match in the 19th century into both a commercial success and a bold cultural statement, it appeared that Ashis Nandy’s contention that cricket,A Corner of a Foreign field: The Indian History of a British Sport By Ramachandra Guha Picador When Aamir Khan turned the story of a fictional cricket match in the 19th century into both a commercial success and a bold cultural statement, it appeared that Ashis Nandy’s contention that cricket was an Indian game invented by the English had received the final endorsement. After all, now, Bollywood had even decided to create a mythology around it.Indian sport’s most famous and historically documented anti-colonial statement was the 1911 victory of the barefoot Mohun Bagan football team over the East Yorkshire Regiment. But in the early 21st century football didn’t give rise to a Lagaan. Cricket did.Ramachandra Guha, writer and historian, throws this pitiful piece of sociological analysis into the dustbin. Well before the Yorkshire Regiment and Lagaan, in 1906 a team of Hindus beat a team of Europeans in a match in Bombay that was written about with great glee in the press, including in the faraway Madras Mail.Guha recounts this and more with relish in his new book, a social history of Indian cricket. It will drive large holes in popular perceptions about the growth and development of cricket in the Indian imagination. Urban India, Guha believes, was drawn to cricket and deeply linked with it long before Independence. A Corner of a Foreign Field is, he says, the story of “forgotten connections and forgotten cricketers”.Ramachandra Guha: Historian on weekdays, cricket writer over the weekendsThe 44-year-old Bangalore-based writer says, “Indian cricket has always reflected the issues of the society around it-whether it was caste, race and religion in the early years of the 20th century or nationalism and commerce today.” That’s not the story we’ve been told.The accepted social history of Indian cricket involves colonial inheritance, princely patronage, quirky tales about Porbander and Vizzy and Lord Harris slowly evolving into the inspired leadership of the Nawab of Pataudi, the great wins in 1971, followed by the era of Sunil Gavaskar, the 1983 World Cup, Kapil Dev, satellite television, Sachin Tendulkar and the high-pitched mayhem we now know and love.advertisementThat remained the tale because, says Guha, “historians are not interested in sports and sports writers are not interested in history and politics”. Er … guilty as charged, on both sides.Guha too considers himself a historian on weekdays and a cricket writer over the weekend, choosing to keep the two occupations divorced from each other. “I always thought cricket and history would be separate. Maybe at the back of my mind I didn’t want to contaminate a sport I loved with politics.”Foreign Field then is a masterly crossover both ways. The differences between Indian history and Indian cricket history were, he discovered, not quite irreconcilable. They came together in the form of a man who is one of Guha’s two personal favourites: the Dalit cricketer Palwankar Baloo, researched and reintroduced to the wider world by Guha in the 1990s.This book happened, he says, by “accident” as he continued his research into Baloo’s life. Baloo, in fact, is almost a metaphor for the entire book, for the centrality of cricket in Indian cultural life: a cricketer of great skill, Baloo was a giant to his own community, a figure so influential he mediated between Gandhi and Ambedkar in 1932. In 1937, he was the Congress candidate against Ambedkar in an election which he lost by a nar row margin. “It started with Baloo but by the time I’d finished … I didn’t think I’d have so much.”Indians have, he says, “always been crazy about cricket”-their adoration for the marvellous Colonel C.K. Nayudu is proof enough. In Nayudu, they had a “nationalist icon-easily the equal of Tendulkar” in an age before mass media and live television.Guha’s writing on cricketers of old has always been like a good sepia-toned photograph, containing within it both nostalgia and clarity. On the contemporary batch he is understated and generous, qualities hard to find in the quote-and-dagger, push-and-shove of the modern cricket press.He certainly has more sympathy for Sourav Ganguly & Co. “In the 1950s, when India began to win Test matches, Jawaharlal Nehru never entered the picture. Today our cricketers are expected to substitute for all our failures-they must win matches because our economy is bad or whatever. It’s an unfair burden.”Losing is a “national humiliation/ shame/ disgrace”, India-Pakistan cricket is a crown of thorns and we are forever being told that the sport has a special status because it evokes “national sentiment”; Guha pokes the cricket chauvinists in the eye in Foreign Field, recounting the time when RSS leader M.S. Golwalkar demanded that the game be banned from post-Independence India. Today, Deputy Prime Minister L.K. Advani smiles and feeds Wasim Akram a few ladoos.advertisementForeign Field will become-and it’s not even a professional risk to say this-a modern classic of Indian cricket writing. There are bound to be comparisons to C.L.R. James’ Beyond the Boundary, something that makes the genteel Guha wince.This is not-the Arundhati Roy episode notwithstanding-a man of the screaming headline or the 10-second soundbite. “Boundary is inimitable. All I wanted to do was write a social history of Indian cricket and make it interesting.” He is currently working on a history of Independent India. Don’t be too surprised if cricketers begin to pop up in it.There are, he believes, entire libraries waiting to be written on the subject, treasures waiting to be found for the scholar or the cricket writer who ventures beyond the conventional boundaries of their individual subject- regional histories, cricket folklore or even the spread of the game beyond the major metros. Foreign Field should certainly spark off a few other searches. Cultural anthropologist, social historian, sociologist, cricket writer … whoever turns to Indian cricket will not end up emptyhanded.Plus, of course, there could even be another Bollywood blockbuster waiting to be made. Based, this time, on a true story.EXCERPTCricket chauvinismAfter their victories in the West Indies and England in 1971, a further twelve years were to pass before India won anything of substance on the cricket field. But this was the big prize, the World Cup itself.The tournament was played in England, and the fancied teams included the hosts, Pakistan, and the West Indies. India started at 50 to 1 outsiders, and even the captain, the superb all-round cricketer Kapil Dev, thought only that his men were ‘capable of a surprise or two’.But they played above themselves to reach the semi-finals. In this round they beat England. Now they would play the West Indies, who had won the trophy in 1975 and 1979, and were generally regarded as unbeatable in the one-day game.For the final at Lord’s the rival supporters ‘had turned the ground into a carnival with the cymbals and bongos of the West Indian supporters in disharmonious rhythm with the dholaks and temple bells of the Indian supporters’.The latter fell silent when Kapil Dev’s side were shot out for the low score of 183. But a few West Indian wickets fell early, panic set in the lower-middle order, and finally they fell forty-three runs short.As it happened, Indira Gandhi was now prime minister once more. Mrs Gandhi sent an early telegram to the cricketers, which said, interalia, that ‘My slogan is India can do it. Thank you for living up to it’. (This slogan, with the cricketers’ photographs, was then displayed on state-owned petrol stations all over India.)The patriotic spirit had caught the players. When they landed at Bombay airport to a crowd shouting ‘Kapil Dev zindabad’, the captain immediately corrected them by saying ‘Bharat zindabad’.advertisementAfter a reception in Bombay the players went home for a few days, and reassembled in Delhi to meet the prime minister. For her reception to the players, held on the lawns of Hyderabad House, Mrs Gandhi was dressed in cricket colours: a dotted white sari with a matching white blouse.The Prime Minister spoke to each player, held the Cup herself, posed for photographs and made a short speech where she told the players: ‘Shabash, keep the flag flying.’What she said next was more notable: to quote a press report, ‘the Prime Minister however expressed surprise that the English press was underplaying the achievement of the Indian team. She said the entire nation had been thrilled at the victory’ The Indian cricket victories of 1971 had taken place in between two personal political victories for Mrs Gandhi; in the elections of January, and on the battlefield in December.Indeed, after that winter’s war against Pakistan-which India won, comprehensively-the cricketers were commandeered for national service. They were asked to play a round of matches to raise money for the Bangladesh Fund.At these games, played all over India, lesser politicians sought also to reflect some of the glory onto themselves. The cricketers, wrote one critic in disgust, ‘became part of a multipurpose circus that went round and round the country- a bandwagon to climb for leaders from all shades of public life’.The nationalism of Mrs Gandhi was a curious mixture of paranoia and triumphalism. Even at the time of her greatest victories she spoke darkly of the ‘enemies of the nation’. In 1971 these were the princes, the capitalists, and the western world.The United States had openly supported Pakistan, and even sent the Seventh Fleet into the Indian Ocean. In this context cricket and cricketers would be used to help Indira, and India, keep those ever-threatening forces at bay.When the Indian team won the World Cup in 1983 Mrs Gandhi was not as firmly in control as in 1971. Her party was riven by inner tensions, her nation riven by regional loyalties-or disloyalties-in particular the rebellions then active in Assam and the Punjab.And the external enemies were also present: note the brooding reference in her speech to the apparent hostility to Indian cricketers of the British press. To suggest that Indira Gandhi saw herself as the Kapil Dev of politics may not be entirely far-fetched.Should the cricket craze in India be compared with the Brazilian love for soccer, then? In that country soccer has become the vehicle for the unfulfilled aspirations of everyday life.The game of football provides a ‘breathing space between a horrific immediate past and an anxiously uncertain future’. Brazil still grapples with an unequal society and an imperfect democracy, but at least they win the World Cup, world sport’s greatest prize, once in every two or three attempts.In India, however, the expression of sporting nationalism is accentuated both by the continuing poverty of its peoples and the very widely dispersed nature of its on-field triumphs.Between 1986 and 1999 India did not lose a single Test series at home, playing in a climate and general environment suitable to its players and on pitches doctored for its spin bowlers. In that same period it only won one Test match overseas, in Sri Lanka.It has won one World Cup out of seven played thus far. It is thirty years since it won a Test series in West Indies, and it has still never won one in Australia. But hope lingers, kept alive by memories of other victories: in West Indies and England in 1971, the World Cup in 1983, the World Championship of Cricket in 1985.Meanwhile, the integration of the world through television and the liberalisation of India’s own economy have made comparisons with other countries more obvious and less palatable.India will never be a Tiger to match the other Asian Tigers. India ranks at about 150 in the World Development Report, just below Namibia and just above Haiti. It is the cricketers, and they alone, who are asked to redeem these failures.Especially in the last decade, cricket nationalism has become more intense and ferocious. One sign is the increasing hostility to cricketers from other countries. In the past, the Indian cricket fan was inclusive in his sympathies; he would worship the West Indian Frankie Worrell and the Englishman Tony Greig alongside Vinoo Mankad and Gundappa Viswanath.This characteristic seemed to confirm the remark of the anthropologist Verrier Elwin that where Christians believe more in God, Hindus believe in more Gods. But it appears that Hinduism has become semiticised.Chauvinism has triumphed over generosity. Our side must win, at any cost. Stone throwing, arson and other acts of vandalism have become increasingly common, especially when India is on the verge of defeat.Such hyper-nationalism places a massive burden on our cricketers. When they lose, the response tends to the vicious. Newspapers call into question the fitness, probity and patriotism of the defeated cricketers.Fans burn their effigies on the streets, and sometimes throw stones at their homes. Win or lose, it is hard work playing cricket for India nowadays. I suppose the ever-increasing pay packet compensates.Edited excerpts from A Corner of a Foreign Field. Ramachandra Guha 2002last_img read more

Manchester United set to seal loan move for Radamel Falcao

first_imgRadamel Falcao is set to join Manchester United on loan after the Premier League club agreed to a loan deal with Monaco, a person with knowledge of the deal said Monday.The Colombia striker’s season-long loan deal will cost United about $9 million and is subject to a medical examination and personal terms being agreed to, the person told The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the deal has not yet been completed.Premier League clubs have until 2200 GMT Monday to sign players before the transfer window closes.United’s need for reinforcements has been highlighted by the failure to win any of its opening four matches under manager Louis van Gaal, who had been hired to halt the decline under David Moyes last season. United’s latest setback was a 0-0 draw at Burnley on Saturday, following a humiliating League Cup loss to third-tier club MK Dons.Falcao, who signed with Monaco a year ago, would be joining a United side out of the Champions League after last season’s seventh-place finish.last_img read more

Services-Haryana game threatened by rain

first_imgMumbai, Oct 4 (PTI) The opening Ranji Trophy game of the season here between Haryana and Services, commencing on October 6, is threatened by rain which has extended its stay beyond its normal season this year in the metropolis. In fact as a forerunner to what could pan out in two days time, todays morning practice of Haryana was called off due to incessant rain by match hosts, Cricket Club of India. “Haryana were scheduled to practice this morning but it is now cancelled. Theres no possibility of having nets even in the afternoon. Services are set to arrive this evening,” said CCIs Sanjay Jaywant. Asked whether the track for the game was ready the former Mumbai Ranji cricketer said,”The wicket has been covered. We are keeping our fingers crossed.” This is the first season in which the Cricket Board has decided to experiment with the neutral venue concept and thats the reason two northern outfits are set to play their season-opening Group C game here. But the rains, which have been incessant since last Saturday after a brief lull, could play the spoil-sport. PTI SSR DK BS BSlast_img read more

WATCH: Sargent and Weah get first USMNT goals

first_imgUnited States VIDEO: Sargent and Weah get first USMNT goals Ben Valentine Last updated 1 year ago 09:59 5/29/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Tim Weah Josh Sargent United States Bolivia USA Today United States United States v Bolivia Bolivia Friendlies Videos The 18-year-olds had a night to remember as both scored their first senior team goals against an overmatched Bolivia side You could not have asked for a better evening for the U.S. national team’s pair of teenagers, Josh Sargent and Tim Weah.Both players linked up well and were the best two players on the field for either the USMNT or Bolivia in the contest, and the 18-year-olds were each rewarded with a goal.After Walker Zimmerman got the USMNT in front, scoring off a corner delivered by Joe Corona, it was Sargent who doubled the lead in the second half. Editors’ Picks Goalkeeper crisis! Walker to the rescue but City sweating on Ederson injury ahead of Liverpool clash Out of his depth! Emery on borrowed time after another abysmal Arsenal display Diving, tactical fouls & the emerging war of words between Guardiola & Klopp Sorry, Cristiano! Pjanic is Juventus’ most important player right now The Werder Bremen forward pressured substitute Bolivia goalkeeper Carlos Lampe into a poor pass that he did well to intercept and bring down with his back to goal.In on goal all alone, Sargent’s low shot was partially blocked by Lampe, but still found the back of the net to make it 2-0.It was a goal in not only his first senior team start, but also in his first cap for the USMNT.Josh Sargent picks off a bad pass from the keeper to score in his USMNT debut! pic.twitter.com/yGual0ejYt — FOX Soccer (@FOXSoccer) May 29, 2018 The score was the feather in the cap, but Sargent played well, excelling in his combination play with Weah.Meanwhile, Weah was the most active player early, seemingly involved with everything the USMNT did in attack. His pace terrorized Bolivia on the right, getting out wide multiple times and setting up team-mates for chances.Weah also had the best opportunity of the game early on, as Rubio Rubin played him in and he turned on the afterburners to get in behind. Reminiscent of a chance he had on his Paris Saint-Germain debut, Weah was unable to beat Bolivia starter Guillermo Vizcarra, who made the kick save.There was a scary moment where it looked like Weah would have to come off after a knee-on-knee collision, but after Julian Green was summoned, Weah managed to stay on.The 18-year-old remained active throughout the first half and was finally rewarded with his first senior team goal in the second half as he got on the end of an Antonee Robinson cross and did not miss. Weah would exit with Sargent a few minutes later.Tim Weah joins in on the fun with his first USMNT goal! pic.twitter.com/A9p4hcErtO — FOX Soccer (@FOXSoccer) May 29, 2018 It was not the greatest of opposition as Bolivia struggled all evening, generating little going forward, and frequently losing both teens as they made runs off one another.But it was exactly what fans of the USMNT, who wanted to see some hope for the future after the nation’s World Cup qualifying disappointment, no doubt wanted to see.last_img read more

Nova Scotia NDP says plan for 1B deficit over four years inspired

first_imgHALIFAX – Nova Scotia’s NDP announced Monday it would add close to $1 billion in red ink over four years, citing Justin Trudeau’s deficit spending as a model for the East Coast province.The provincial Liberals claimed NDP Leader Gary Burrill is prone to “hard left” policies, while a Tory spokesman called the deficits a “reckless spending orgy.”But Burrill said the fiscal plan he unveiled at the Dalhousie University student union building is merely taking Ottawa’s lead.With 45,000 Nova Scotians regularly attending food banks, thousands of citizens lacking a family doctor and Halifax’s largest hospital unable to provide potable water last year, the drive towards balanced budgets has to be reconsidered, he said.“We think this is a turn we need to make,” he said after releasing the 28-page party platform as the campaign reached its halfway point.“The answer the federal Liberals gave in their last budget and in their last platform about this was the right one.”Trudeau’s government is forecasting a $28.5 billion federal deficit in 2017-18.Burrill’s platform projects this year’s deficit in the province would be $256 million, and by 2021 would total $966 million over their mandate.The projected deficit makes most of the same assumptions as the recent Liberal provincial budget.However, the NDP have added four-year commitments to spend $230 million to improve daycare, $120 million to increase the number of doctors and $160 million to “ensure that everyone on income assistance can afford to buy their food from a grocery store, instead of relying on food banks.”The third-place party tumbled from a majority government in 2013 to its current status of five seats — and political observers have commented that it has moved left under Burrill’s leadership as part of its rebuilding effort aimed at restoring its base support.Under former premier Darrell Dexter, the party also ran deficits, though the party publicly espoused the goal of balancing the budget.Burrill said times have changed.“What we’re saying is … that we not fool ourselves that in one budget year we can address this,” he told reporters.Stephen McNeil’s Liberals have produced back-to-back balanced budgets and say they are now in a position to begin investing strategically in the province’s infrastructure and improving the struggling health care system.The premier has repeatedly said this approach distinguishes him from opponents. He’s vowed to produce a string of growing surpluses — and to begin reducing the province’s $15 billion debt, which is about $15,900 for every citizen.After announcing Monday he would invest $17.4 million in two programs that support the aquaculture and agriculture industries, the premier criticized Burrill as presenting an untenable fiscal plan.He said the federal situation differs from Nova Scotia’s because Trudeau plans to spend heavily on infrastructure and his government can hope for a Western oil rebound that will bring in federal taxes.“The NDP would slide us backwards. It’s really unbelievable to me,” said McNeil in an interview.Further, the Liberals said in a news release that Burrill is an “anti-capitalist” who supported the Leap Manifesto, which they say would be dangerous and harmful to the economy.Burrill laughed off the Liberal release, saying he comes from a background of Christian socialism in the tradition of Tommy Douglas and other founders of the New Democratic Party.He says he believes in a society that is egalitarian and helps the poor, but declined to refer to himself as “anti capitalist,” as the news release claims he has in the past.Tory leader Jamie Baillie, who has denounced the NDP’s deficit plans as irresponsible, released a platform last week promising millions in spending commitments along with balanced budgets. However, Baillie’s figures have been criticized as being vague.Meanwhile, the NDP hasn’t closed the door on having to find further money for public sector salaries — which opens the possibility Burrill’s deficits could grow if his party regains power on May 30.The platform confirms the NDP would scrap a bill that imposed a wage pattern on teachers — a template the Liberals plan to apply to all of the public sector unions.Asked where the money will come from to pay for higher wage settlements, Burrill argued that he expects there will be economic growth resulting from the deficit spending.The party is also projecting in its platform that by 2021 it will be saving $82 million a year by spending less on tax credits, “corporate welfare,” consulting and advertising, though there are few details on what this entails.The NDP also says in the document that it would “introduce a system of proportional representation,” but Burrill told reporters he wouldn’t firmly commit to that occurring in one mandate.last_img read more

NICKELODEON UNVEILS FIRST LOOK AT ARE YOU AFRAID OF THE DARK REBOOT

first_img Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Nickelodeon’s “Are You Afraid of the Dark?” brought a scary good time to an entire generation of kids back in the 1990s, and the network is getting ready to unleash a new version of the show for today’s children.A new trailer indicates the upcoming reboot may be darker and scarier than the original, featuring a new crew of kids sitting around a campfire sharing new stories for the approval of the Midnight Society. Advertisement The three-episode miniseries will follow “an entirely new Midnight Society group of kids who tell a terrifying tale about the Carnival of Doom, only to have the events of the story come to life,” reads the synopsis for the upcoming show, which has yet to announce a premiere date. Facebook Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

A Radical Proposal To Destroy The NHLs Loser Point

The NHL’s “loser point” is the stupidest rule in sports. For the non-puckheads among you, here’s how it works: The NHL awards one point in the standings to a team that loses a game in overtime or a shootout. But teams get two points for winning a game, whether in regulation or beyond. You don’t need a degree in #fancystats to recognize the problem: There are a total of three points to distribute when a game goes to overtime but just two otherwise. So it really pays off to play for OT. As FiveThirtyEight contributors Noah Davis and Michael Lopez documented Wednesday, this encourages dull, passive hockey. Goal scoring falls dramatically in the third period of tied games, right when a game should be coming to its climax.This is more than a minor annoyance; the loser point has already changed the identity of at least one NHL champion. In 2012, the Los Angeles Kings finished with 40 wins and 42 losses; they made the playoffs ahead of the 42-40 Dallas Stars because they accumulated 15 loser points to the Stars’ five. Then the Kings went on to win the Stanley Cup.Fortunately, having a rule as dumb as the loser point means that almost anything would be an improvement. For instance, the NHL could award three points for a win in regulation. An overtime or shootout winner would still get two points. That would at least make each game worth the same amount in the standings.Or you could eliminate the shootout and go back to having ties. The NHL claims that 70 percent to 80 percent of its fans like the shootout but has never made any detailed data on this available to the public. As regular readers of FiveThirtyEight will know, there are lots of ways to manipulate survey questions to produce a desired outcome. Maybe the same consultants telling Donald Trump that he’d make a great presidential candidate are advising Gary Bettman on the loser point.But I have something more radical in mind. Here’s the idea: You keep playing hockey until someone wins. You know, like in the NBA and Major League Baseball and pretty much every other sport but soccer — and like the NHL itself during the playoffs.The usual objection is that this could lead to some extraordinarily long games for two measly points in the standings. What if the Flyers and Penguins play a five-overtime game and the Penguins need to catch a flight to Calgary? Why add even more ice time to a grueling, 82-game regular season?But these cases are rarer than you might think. If you played every NHL regular-season game under playoff rules — 5-on-5 overtime, indefinitely, until someone scores — it would increase ice time by only about 3 percent. In the chart below, I’ve tracked what percentage of overtime playoff games (since 1995) were resolved within a given number of minutes. In the majority of games — 56 percent — someone scored within the first 10 minutes. Only 7 percent of games, meanwhile, required two or more overtimes.Overall, the average overtime game required 13.6 minutes before someone scored. Since 23 percent of playoff games went to OT, that makes the average length of a playoff game about 63 minutes, as compared to around 61 minutes during the regular season.That’s not much of an increase, and if the NHL were concerned about it, it could counteract it by reducing the regular season to 80 games from 82. Then you’d have no shootouts, no ties, no loser point and no overall increase in ice time.Still, maybe we’re concerned about those cases when one team has played a multiple-overtime game and faces off against another on fresh skates. Equivalent cases come up all the time in other sports — baseball, basketball, tennis — and they deal with it. But you could argue that it’s a bigger problem in hockey given the punishing nature of the sport.The solution is to take players off the ice, which will increase scoring. This isn’t a new idea at all — during the regular season, the NHL plays 4-on-4 hockey in overtime, and there have been proposals to go to 3-on-3.But here’s my insight: Goals are scored so quickly during 3-on-3 play that you could play every game to sudden death and pretty much never inconvenience anyone. The players, the referees, the 13-year-old in Winnipeg who refuses to do his algebra homework until the Jets game is finished — they’d all be OK.You may have noticed, in the graphic above, that I drew a smooth curve (labeled “model”) alongside the historical data. The curve is formed by assuming that there’s a 7.4 percent chance of scoring a goal per minute of overtime play, which is the historical rate in the playoffs since 1995. As you can see, the curve “fits” the historical data extremely well. That means the length of overtime games is easy to model.1It also implies that the rate of scoring is fairly constant throughout overtime. If you know the overall rate of scoring, you can accurately guess how many games will require at least two overtimes, for instance.In 4-on-4 play, there’s a 9.1 percent chance of a goal being scored each minute (according to research by Stephen Pettigrew), about 20 percent higher than under 5-on-5 conditions. It’s 3-on-3 action that sees a really radical shift, however, with a 16.8 percent chance of a goal each minute.So what if overtime was played 3-on-3? About 60 percent of games would be resolved within the first five minutes, and 84 percent within the first 10 minutes. Only about 3 percent of overtime games would require double overtime, and fewer than 1 in 1000 would go to triple-OT. The average overtime game would require just six minutes to complete, barely longer than under the current rules.2And you’d reduce the number of overtime games since the loser point would be eliminated — teams would no longer have an incentive to play for OT. And with just three skaters on the ice at a time, teams could give their bench plenty of rest between shifts.The NHL could also adopt some compromise or another. It could play five minutes of 4-on-4 overtime immediately at the end of regulation, as it does now, then clean the ice3During the regular season, the NHL doesn’t bring the Zamboni out and clean the ice after regulation, something you’d probably need to do if you’re going to play more than a few minutes worth of extra hockey. As a fan, I don’t get why the NHL seems to be in a rush to finish overtime games during the regular season — I love the tension that builds up during the pre-overtime intermission in the playoffs. and play an indefinite amount of 3-on-3 overtime if needed. It could declare a tie if no one had scored after a full 20-minute period of 3-on-3 overtime. (Ties would be a rarity, almost like they are now in the NFL.) It could keep removing players from the ice until it was just goalie versus goalie.4The NHL would need to relax the rule that prohibits goalies from advancing past the red line. Would you not stop whatever you were doing to watch Henrik Lundqvist versus Tuukka Rask, one-on-one?Or insert your own proposal: Overtime decided by rock-paper-scissors? Nearly anything would be better than the loser point. read more

Graham to arrive at OSU with lofty expectations

“Legacy” is an oft-used word in association with Ohio State football.   It is used to describe the honor and responsibility passed down from OSU teams to their present counterparts.For incoming recruit and quarterback prospect Taylor Graham, the word “legacy” carries a deeper meaning.Graham will be bringing more than just his personal belongings, a Kordell Stewart poster and a laptop to campus with him this fall. He has the exploits of his father, former OSU quarterback Kent Graham, as baggage.The elder Graham, the OSU signal-caller under John Cooper in the 1991 season, went on to a journeyman’s career in the NFL. He played for eight different teams, beginning with the New York Giants and then retiring from the Jacksonville Jaguars in 2002.His son, a 6-foot-4-inch, 211-pound prospect from dad’s alma mater, Wheaton North in Illinois, hopes to have a career that equals or surpasses that of his famous father.Kevin Noon, managing editor of BuckeyeGrove.com, thinks he may have the skills to do just that.“He has the tools to be successful at this level, having an Ohio State and NFL alum as a father to go along with his frame,” Noon said.While he is not the only quarterback recruited for OSU’s 2010 class, the other, Marion Franklin product Verlon Reed, is expected to switch to another position because of his versatile athleticism. That puts Graham in a position to eventually challenge for the same starting position his father once anchored.Graham may not possess the speed or agility of current Buckeye quarterback Terrelle Pryor, or even Reed for that matter, but he is more in the mold of a classic, drop-back passer like former OSU greats Bobby Hoying or, yes, Kent Graham.“He is mobile enough to move around in the pocket if need be, but will never be mistaken as a dual-threat quarterback,” Noon said. “He has a big arm and a great football mind but will still need to work on his touch and decision-making.”In addition to his accuracy and mechanics, he walks onto campus with durability concerns. He broke an ankle just five games into his junior season. Then, with a scholarship offer from OSU already in hand, Graham suffered a PCL tear in his knee and was once again limited to five games his senior year.During those 10 games he was able to compete in, however, he threw for 1,380 yards and eight touchdowns, against just one interception.Noon doesn’t appear overly concerned.“He hasn’t been able to escape the injury bug over the past two seasons, but neither of the past injuries could be classified as ‘chronic,’” Noon said.Graham, who was born at the OSU Medical Center in the literal and figurative shadow of The ‘Shoe, will have quite a tradition to live up to. If he can prove that he can overcome the ‘injury-prone’ label and the added pressure that comes with being a true legacy, someday he’ll get his chance. read more

Gardening When children grow their own food they develop food empathy and

first_imgGardening: ‘When children grow their own food, they develop ‘food empathy’ and have better diets’ Research shows that when children are involved in the garden, they are more likely to try new foods at home, writes Michael Kelly. 5 Comments I ABSOLUTELY LOVE this time of the year, not least because spring is finally here and we can now start to sow some seeds, but also because this is the time of the year when we kick off our national schools’ growing campaign.For the last 6 years we’ve been working with our friends at Innocent to get children growing as a way to re-establish their connection with food. This year’s Sow & Grow campaign is the biggest we’ve ever done with over 250,000 children in total taking part in Ireland and the UK. In Ireland alone, 45,000 children will take part in 1,500 schools over the coming months.They will sow seeds in special Sow & Grow cups in an in-classroom exercise with their teacher. Because the sowing is done in cups (that can be taken home afterwards), any school can take part, regardless of whether they have a school garden or not, and regardless of whether the teacher has any food-growing expertise.Food-growing movement statisticsAs part of the launch this year we’re revealing statistics from a household survey carried out by Behaviour and Attitudes Ireland. The results show food-growing moving into the mainstream.We were thrilled to hear that 99% of those surveyed believe it is valuable for kids to learn how to grow their own food at school, and also that 47% of those surveyed have grown some food at home in the previous 12 months.Though the scale of Sow & Grow is immense this year, these survey results show that parents want more food-growing to happen at school. One of the most important steps our Government could take to get children healthy is to put food on the curriculum – this research shows that parents want this to happen and understand how beneficial it would be.Food empathy Helping to launch the national Sow & Grow project at Scoil Thomáis in Castleknock in Dublin are 2nd class students Kayla O’Gorman (7), Brian Buie (8), left, and Callum O’Keeffe (8). Source: Mark StedmanResearch shows us that when children grow some of their own food they develop what we call “food empathy”, a deeper connection with food, which is proven to lead to a healthier life.Food empathetic children have better diets, eat more fruit and vegetables and have a better understanding of food and nutrition. At a time when Ireland still has among the highest rates of childhood obesity in the EU, establishing a deeper connection with food is more important than ever.On a smaller scale we’re also working with a number of schools in Waterford on an Eat Together social eating programme. We deliver a 2-course hot dinner and the children take a full 45 minutes to eat together using proper plates, bowls and cutlery.It’s a world away from the normally wolfed-down sandwich. Instead the children enjoy a delicious, nutritious dinner, in a sociable way, experiencing new tastes with their peers.Research from last term’s programme shows us that the children were more likely to try new foods at home as a result, and that 100% of parents wanted the programme to continue. These are small, but important steps to put food back at the centre of education, where it belongs.Schoolteachers can apply for a free Sow & Grow pack, which will then be delivered to their school over the coming weeks.Top 5 Tips for Growing Food with KidsKids love sowing seeds (or indeed anything that involves getting their hands dirty). Bigger seeds like those from peas, beans, squashes, pumpkins and courgettes are easier for younger children to handle.Give kids some autonomy in the veg patch. Give them a dedicated raised bed or part of a bed for them to experiment with. Let them grow what they want to grow.Encourage them to grow fruit and vegetables that are fast growing so that they see a quick return. Radishes are a good example. Runner beans and sunflowers will get tall quickly. Get them to measure themselves against the plants each week.Encourage them to sample crops out in the veg patch. They will love grazing on sweet carrots, tomatoes, strawberries and peas, and it will help develop their palette.The top GIY activities for kids are sowing seeds, digging and watering. Basically, the messier the job, the more they will love it.Recipe of the Week – Spiced Carrot and Lentil Soup Source: Shutterstock/Lucky_elephantThis is a lovely spicey soup that’s full of iron and low in fat.Ingredients600g carrots, washed and coarsely grated (no need to peel)2 tsp cumin seedsa pinch of chilli flakes2 tbsp olive oil140g split red lentils1l hot vegetable stock125ml milkplain yogurtHeat a large saucepan and dry-fry the cumin seeds and chilli flakes for 1 min, or until they start to jump around the pan and release their aromas.Scoop out about half of the seeds with a spoon and set aside. Add the oil, carrot, lentils, stock and milk to the pan and bring to the boil.Simmer for 15 mins until the lentils have swollen and softened.Whizz the soup with a hand blender or in a food processor until smooth (or leave it chunky if you prefer). Season to taste and finish with a dollop of yogurt and a sprinkling of the reserved toasted spices.Michael Kelly is founder of GIY and GROW HQ. Click here for more GIY tips and recipes. Saturday 4 Feb 2017, 3:00 PM Grower Short URL 1,431 Views Share Tweet Email2 Michael Kelly By Michael Kelly http://jrnl.ie/3217359 Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Feb 4th 2017, 3:00 PM last_img read more

Les casques Superbeam USB avec micros binauraux

first_imgLes casques Superbeam USB avec micros binauraux !Depuis quelques temps, il semble que la tendance penche vers l’obtention d’une qualité sonore irréprochable. De plus en plus, nos produits de nouvelles technologies s’équipent d’accessoires permettant un rendu sonore sensationnel (les fameux Beats by Dre par exemple). C’est encore le cas avec  les Superbeam mais avec un atout en plus.Il est de plus en plus courant de voir des casques qui annulent le bruit environnant. Les casques de la marque Andrea, les Superbeam USB en font partie. Ils possèdent également des micros performants qui font de même. Cela signifie que vos interlocuteurs, lors d’une conversation téléphonique ou d’un enregistrement vidéo, n’auront plus de désagréables bruits de fond. On peut imaginer que les procédés binauraux tendent alors à se développer sur de nombreux accessoires quotidiens. Andrea (la marque, pas la voisine…) propose donc, avec deux versions différentes, les SuperBeam Buds et SuperBeam Phones, aux prix respectifs de 129,95 (95 euros) et 149,95 dollars (110 euros environ).Le 13 novembre 2011 à 15:04 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

Rafael Benitez denies fight with Jamaal Lascelles

first_imgThe Newcastle United manager has said the player was absent during the weekend during an ankle problem and not because of an argumentNewcastle United coach Rafael Benitez has denied any argument with captain Jamaal Lascelles.The Spanish manager says the footballer’s absence from the match against Chelsea was because the player has an ankle problem.“The doctor is better than me, we’re waiting for results of a scan for Jamaal,” Benitez told the media as reported by Sportskeeda.“He came to support the team, I spoke to him before and after the game and three or four times this morning.”Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“His partner is expecting a baby but everything is fine. I don’t know how long he’ll be out for,” he explained.MEDIA: Newcastle United boss Rafa Benítez has been speaking to the media ahead of Wednesday’s @Carabao_Cup clash against @NFFC. Here’s what he had to say… #NUFC— Newcastle United FC (@NUFC) August 28, 2018last_img read more

Wijnaldum Liverpool will fight on till the end

first_imgGeorginio Wijnaldum has urged his teammates to fight on despite the blip they suffered at the Etihad Stadium.The Reds unbeaten run came to an end after Man City beat them 2-1 on Thursday night as goals from Sergio Aguero and Leroy Sane gave the hosts three points.Firmino’s equaliser wasn’t enough to salvage a point for Klopp’s men but Dutch midfielder Wijnaldum believes the loss will not dent their title aspirations.“I think we did enough to get a point and we could have won it also,” Wijnaldum told Liverpoolfc.com after the final whistle at Etihad Stadium.“We were quite unlucky with the chances but we also could lose it – like we have now. We just have to keep the confidence and try to win the next game.Top 5 Premier League players to watch for next weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Premier League’s Top 5 players to watch this weekend.After…“They cleared well and we hit the post. They also had two or three chances so it could have gone either way; we could have won, drawn or lost. At the end, we were unlucky and they won the game.”“We knew before it would be a hard game and we would have to give everything to win the game,” said the Netherlands international.“A few games this season we were lucky we have scored goals, and tonight we were quite unlucky with the chances that we had. That’s football.“Sometimes you have games where you score a lot and score with every chance that you get – and sometimes you don’t. What we have to do now is to keep our confidence and win the next game.”last_img read more

TURKS CAICOS TO TOUGHEN UP ON ILLEGALS

first_img TCI Premier Responds To Beaches’ Letter Announcing Closure TCI on Alert as riots rage in Haiti, two-year president asked to resign Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:governor peter beckingham, haiti, illegal migrants, memorandum of understanding, MOU, pnp administration, premier, turks and caicos Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 24 Nov 2014 – A measure similar to what the Bahamas Ministry of Foreign Affairs instituted for immigrants is coming for the Turks and Caicos. Announced last week by the Premier during what he dubbed, his mid-term address the nation’s leader commended the work of the coastal radar and pledged his administration’s commitment to building its capacity within the new budget year… but he also said for illegals already living in the Turks and Caicos, there is a plan. QUOTE. Regularizing those here justifiably and documenting those which are not in the country on legal status is a stride the PNP Administration is prepared to activate. Law enforcers said the nation’s leader are already being prepared. During a recent trip into Haiti, HE Peter Beckingham, the Governor also promised the Haitian government to aide in a registration of its citizens in The Turks and Caicos. The words of the MOU between the two countries have been agreed to now, it is just left for the documents to be signed. Turks and Caicos islanders among those from the outside watching the situation with bated breath as The Bahamas on November 1st took a stern stance on illegal migrants; while the move has brought backlash… it has seen hundreds of non-documented migrants rounded up, deported and has received acclaim from Bahamian citizens. Hospital overflowing, chaos, damage and dead bodies in Gros-Morne Haitilast_img read more

Active Interest Media Cuts Staff by 10 Percent

first_imgBackpacker and Yoga Journal publisher Active Interest Media has laid off 23 employees, representing about 10 percent of its workforce. The cuts, according to a spokesperson, were made across “most divisions” and were “non-revenue producing” positions.“We have experienced a slowdown in print advertising revenue in the fourth quarter and we expect it to continue into 2009,” chairman and CEO Efrem “Skip” Zimbalist wrote in an e-mail to FOLIO:. “While AIM is strong and profitable, we must keep costs and revenues in line in order to stay strong.  We truly regret having to take these actions, as those who are leaving were real contributors to our success.” Through the first nine months, Backpacker’s ad pages grew 5.4 percent compared to the same period last year, according to Publisher’s Information Bureau figures. Estimated ad revenue was up 10.1 percent to $20.1 million.Other AIM titles, including Yoga Journal and Vegetarian Times, are not tracked by PIB.last_img read more

Thom Bells Major Influence On The Stylistics

first_imgNETWORK ERRORCannot Contact ServerRELOAD YOUR SCREEN OR TRY SELECTING A DIFFERENT VIDEO Oct 9, 2017 – 12:11 pm Russell Thompkins Jr. On Thom Bell’s Impact Thom Bell’s “Major Influence” On The Stylistics thom-bells-major-influence-stylistics Thom Bell’s “Major Influence” On The Stylistics Facebook Email This is something Russell Thompkins Jr. knows intimately as a member of the Philly soul group the Stylistics, for whom Bell co-wrote and produced several hits, including “I’m Stone In Love With You,” “Stop, Look, Listen (To Your Heart)” and “You Are Everything.””He was the major influence of my career,” says Thompkins. “When I first went in with Tommy, I think I was 19 or 20 years old. That’s when I first started learning my craft. And from the things that I learned from doing the sessions with him, it’s lasted me my whole career.”Now, Thompkins will have a chance to honor Bell, a 2017 Recording Academy Trustees Award recipient, for his contributions to the music industry during the Academy’s “GRAMMY Salute To Music Legends” two-hour TV special in recognition of this year’s class of Special Merit Awards recipients.Thompkins will perform a rendition of “You Make Me Feel Brand New” in Bell’s honor, one of the biggest songs Bell did with the Stylistics. But Thompkins’ favorite Bell tune?”My favorite song of Thom Bell’s in ‘Betcha By Golly Wow,'” says Thompkins. “It’s the song in my show that I never get tired of performing. It’s a wonderful song. I think out of the Stylistics’ songs, it’s the most recorded and done by other artists.”Tune in to “GRAMMY Salute To Music Legends” on PBS on Oct. 13 at 9 p.m. on PBS. In addition to Bell, honorees will include Lifetime Achievement Award recipients Sly Stone, Charley Pride and Shirley Caesar. Other artists scheduled to pay tribute to the honorees include Andra Day, Dwight Yoakam and Kirk Franklin.”GRAMMY Salute To Music Legends”: Performers And Full Set ListRead more News Twitter Ahead of the “GRAMMY Salute To Music Legends” TV special, take a look at how producer/label exec Thom Bell impacted the Stylistics and the sound of the Stylistics and Philly soulRenée FabianGRAMMYs Oct 9, 2017 – 12:12 pm There would have been no classic sound of Philadelphia soul in the 1970s if it weren’t for producer/record label executive Thom Bell.last_img read more

Campbell Pens Book Giving Hope To Family Caregivers

first_imgBy MARK F. GRAY, Staff Writer, mgray@afro.comChallenges in caring for loved ones with special needs can cause pressure on those who must make their lives comfortable in later years.  The needs to be met are both practical and emotional and often put strains on family relationships.Author Teraleen Campbell understands the pressure that goes with caring for an indigent family member in their final years.  As an only child she faced the task of caring for her mother as an only child for the last six years of her mother’s life.As her mother’s caregiver, author Teraleen Campbell used her own experiences as inspiration for the book “Carefree to Caregiver,” which has been published for National Caregivers Month. (Courtesy Photo)In her book from “Carefree to Caregiver,” Campbell discusses what caregivers face when trying to comfort loved ones who need full time attention and the affect it can have on their lives.  She uses her experiences from the time caring for her mother as a way to tell help shed light on facing the challenges of her responsibility and to provide counseling to those who may be approaching this critical juncture in their lives.“It can be a difficult road when you’re trying to take care of a parent or a spouse when they can no longer do for themselves,” Campbell told the AFRO.  “When the normal routine of life is lost, and you have to assume that responsibility it can be overwhelming”.Family caregivers are the unsung heroes of this generation. With baby boomers living longer – even with health challenges – their support has become vital in handling the personal matters that accompany those twilight years.Instead of framing the narrative in a desperate light, she puts her challenges in an inspirational form that paints a picture of optimism and gives the reader hope.  The book is formatted as 31-day devotional book. Each daily passage provides an inspirational reading in addition to a prayer and space for journaling.Being a caregiver is not limited to providing medical care. It also includes working with medical staff to ensure that quality care is provided.  Additionally, there are often legal and financial considerations.In most cases, caregivers feel unprepared for the level of responsibilities that they must assume. Long term caregiving can lead to burn out, especially if the caregiver has not adjusted their life to successfully balance their new role.“I realized the importance of taking some time to focus on me and what I was dealing with, in addition to processing what was happening in my life. I became mindful that if I wasn’t healthy, I couldn’t adequately care for my mother. “According to data from AARP, 43.5 million caregivers have provided unpaid care to an adult or child for at least 12 months. Nearly one in six working adults have responsibilities of providing care for a family member. Additionally, 69% of working caregivers caring for a family member or friend report having to rearrange their work schedule, decrease their hours, or take an unpaid leave in order to meet their caregiving responsibilities. These situations can adversely affect the mental and physical health of the very caregivers who are providing support for others.Campbell, who is also a minister at Greater Mt. Calvary Holy Church in Washington, D.C., noticed as she was putting her stories to paper that there were not many books that addressed the African American community’s perils when facing becoming caregivers.  She hopes that this book will help to make it easier for those families to address the issues to prepare them for the hard decisions they will face, should they become caregivers.“In our community people don’t want to discuss transitional lifestyle decisions,” Campbell adds.  “Its tough handling things by yourself and hopefully this book will be of comfort and support”.last_img read more